Savannah Storyist Shannon Scott is The Bard of Bonaventure

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Savannah Storyist Shannon Scott is
The Bard of Bonaventure

As a fan of all things Gothic and of the phenomenal bestselling book, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt (1994) and the movie of the same name (1997), I have long been fascinated with the singularly unique city of Savannah, Georgia. The city’s splendid Federal, Georgian, Regency, Italianate, Romanesque Revival and Second French Empire architectural styles, stunning ornate ironwork, 22 historic squares, and live oak trees dripping with Spanish Moss just scream Gothic romance. It is known as America’s Most Haunted City because it was literally built upon its dead and you don’t have to walk far along its streets to bump into someone who has had a ghostly encounter.

I finally got to visit Savannah for the first time in March of this year and returned for a very quick second visit in mid-October. I’m going back in January because the place has cast a spell on me and I truly feel that absorbing what it has to offer is part of my spiritual path.

The most important tourist destination for me was always going to be Bonaventure Cemetery because of its beauty and because I’ve been interested in history and the paranormal since I was a teenager.  Meeting Savannah Storyist, Shannon Scott, also known as The Bard of Bonaventure, was a delightful experience as he is one of the most interesting people I have ever met and if you read this interview in its entirety you will understand why. He’s a busy man so I didn’t have time to ask him many questions in person, but he has graciously agreed to be interviewed for my blog.

Christine Bode and Shannon Scott

Christine Bode meets Shannon Scott in Bonaventure Cemetery, March 3, 2018.

Shannon is a Renaissance man … a charming, multi-talented, intelligent gentleman, who has had a fascinating career as an artist, filmmaker, producer, paranormal expert, historian, author, storyteller, tour guide and CEO of Bonaventure Cemetery Journeys and Shannon Scott Tours.

Thank you for agreeing to take the time to answer my questions, Shannon, and for being a guest of my blog.

Note to readers: This is a very long, but fascinating read. It is not a typical blog post and is not to be rushed through. Take your time. Prepare your favorite beverage. Turn your phone off. Enjoy it in pieces. But do finish it as it will be worth it to anyone who has similar interests. 


SHANNON’S PARANORMAL OR “PSYCHICAL” WORLD EXPERIENCE

When and why did you become interested in the paranormal?

I honestly prefer the word “psychical” if just one, because it’s a better word and one that I can take more seriously.  It’s more of a true historical literary word and has a broader connotation respective of the spiritual journey, layers of connection between the emotional nature of human beings and the world around us.  Which is what I’m interested in as a personal course of learning.  The word paranormal is like its modern day, bucolic cousin.  Although, I’ll be the first to admit that like everyone else I have taken advantage of its marketability as it draws attention to these spiritual and metaphysical subjects.  I mean I did own at one time, Savannah’s most famous ghost tour company, Sixth Sense Savannah.  It’s a useful word.  But it comes with a price for someone like me and I have worked harder to distance myself from that word and in some sense, the paranormal culture, because it’s become fashionable and gimmicky and often very silly.  But as an old soul and deep thinker, I’ve always taken in connections around me so being in touch with my psychical aspects from a very early age led me to being open-minded, but with Reason well intact, and from there, following my sense of curiosity.  In high school, I worked in a Victorian cemetery called Maplewood and when you dig graves, weed eat around old headstones, make a study of inscribed sentiments and last gasps of family expression, it gets you thinking perhaps more than the average person about life and death.

How did you become a paranormal expert?

Again, there’s that word. Hah!  In fairness you could say I became a very reasonable recorder or historian of at least Savannah’s haunted history.  When I was still a newbie here some 30 years ago, I noted that in the same way in other towns, people talked about the weather, in Savannah, the subject of ghosts was giving the one of weather a run for its money!  And it wasn’t as if I went looking for it.  It’s like it was just there…at sidewalk cafe tables, coffeehouses, people’s dinner tables.  And it also had a gossip like quality. Like in the way someone wants to tell you about a cousin who met a celebrity once? Exactly.  Everyone wanted to talk about the ghost over at their friend’s home or their own ghost-lebrity encounter.  I think the first ghost story told to me was by a man in line at a Kroger grocery.  At the time, I’d just gotten off the Objectivist boat with philosopher Ayn Rand, which means like a lot of college kids sorting out the universe, I’d pretty much become a card-carrying atheist and was in no way going to hear about the ghosts. Needless to say, Savannah had other plans for what I thought I knew about the metaphysical world.  Ultimately, my sojourn into all of this is a mixture of just growing as an individual, having some other worldly experiences and then also some course onto an existential path called “a job.”  And then different jobs that all stacked up to me gaining knowledge and notoriety.

At one point in my storyteller life, I was asked by a tour company owner to develop ghost tours for the area as there was only one operating that was more family operated and he wanted something that would really stand out.  I refused flatly as I didn’t want to be associated with anything of the kind.  Ghost tours in my mind were hokey and just didn’t appeal to my beliefs. But then he named my price.  Hah!  I agreed on the condition that I could craft a tour in a journalistic form and base it on current hauntings or for anything that was historical in nature, that I would be able to source it versus just reciting it out of the book, Savannah Spectres.  Which I will acknowledge as a book, was the first and original source for every ghost tour company in town and was the first book to break ground on sharing this knowledge with the greater public.  I used it as a reference for tracking down the witch, Sybil Leek, the ghost hunter couple and demonologists, Ed and Lorraine Warren from The Amityville, and a host of other important people like Uri Geller.  Eventually I tracked them all down less Sybil Leek who was deceased, but her son Julian and I went through her collection of papers that she’d recorded regarding her work in Savannah.

At the same time, I was running all those characters down, I typed up a letter to the general public, printed 1000 copies and went around downtown and put them in people’s mailboxes in the hopes of landing interviews. I ended up sitting down with people or took their calls and emails, compiling what eventually became my first ghost tour.  To my knowledge I was the first person to ever go at such a thing at that level and in some respect, I became the second ghost tour guide ever in Savannah operating a nightly tour and the first to offer this more mature, envelope-pushing researched tour.  I spent the next 15 years doing it too.

As I built my notoriety as a storyteller and researcher, Hollywood started periodically reaching out to me and would ask me for stories for different shows they were doing and at first it was, “Do you have a story about a Civil War romance” or whatever it was, but eventually in the late 1990’s they start calling more and more about haunted subjects.  In 1999 I was hired by Triage Entertainment to help research and shoot the pilot episode of Scariest Places on Earth with Linda Blair.  We shot some of the pilot episode in Savannah and over the course of the next six years, I was active in working for shows like MTV’s FEAR, ABC Family’s Real Scary Stories and then my last gig was researcher and associate producer on the 2005 Halloween episode of Ghost Hunters.  In that time period, I got to travel and talk to about every parapsychologist, psychic, medium, and clairvoyant that was working presently or had achieved some acclaim in the past. Eventually, I got out of the TV side of things and concentrated on making my documentary, “America’s Most Haunted City – Part One” about Savannah, Georgia. So, you see, it’s a long arc of events and a combination of many experiences that made me as you say, a “paranormal expert.” Again, cringing here.

Please forgive me for making you cringe as it wasn’t my intention. Will you tell me about the creepiest supernatural experience you’ve ever had?

Gosh.  I’d have to say in my house on E. Jones Street… One night I was awakened by the cold nose of my Alaskan sled dog, Mina the Malamute, which was the universal high sign for “Daddy, I have to go pee now.”  Admittedly, I was on the fourth floor of an 1850’s row house and so if in fact I was feeling exhausted, I would just open the door to my deck and she’d click clack out there and pee on the deck and the gutter would catch it.  I know, right?  But as she got older? Bathroom time was me carrying her down four flights of stairs and generally back up and so as there was the risk that she’d not make it in time, the deck option was also practical.

So that night she goes out there and squats but instead of going straight out, she B-lined to the side of the deck, squatted and then came back past me rather quickly.  Now, I’m half asleep, my contacts are out, but I’m standing there thinking, “that’s odd.”  And that’s when I noticed “It.”  It was about 10 feet in front of me.  It had what I would call large hollow eyes, a gaping mouth and was wearing some sort of tattered cloak and it wasn’t just standing there, it was hovering.  Now I get into trouble when I invoke the whole Harry Potter wraith thing, but if you need a visual? That’s pretty much it.  Now what I can tell you is exactly this.  I was shooting it an energy of, “I’ve never seen anything like you before,” and it was sending me a vibe of, “I’m not used to anyone seeing me.”  It was like it was busted or something?  Anyway, as I stood there, I just remember looking right at it and saying as directly as possible, “YOU CAN’T COME IN HERE!”  I then shut the door and for the next 10 minutes walked around like a madman in my room shaking of the heebies.  I then put my contact lenses in and opened the door back up and it was gone.  I even remember looking down the rooftops of the directly adjoining row houses to see if I could see anything and I did not.  Over time, this being would present itself to others both while I lived there and even to the Cherokee Indian girl who moved in right after me.  This was in part why Ghost Hunters investigated my house in 2005 but it was done as an aside thing to the show and wasn’t meant for the show itself.

Do you have any psychic ability?

I have psychical abilities like every human being.  It is limited to empathic and some seer type things where I can see or visualize a person in their future even if I’ve only known them briefly.  But I do not associate this with anything out of the ordinary or being extra special.  It’s just what already makes me special as an individual in a completely natural way, and all of us for that matter.  You’ll never see me on a TV show or promoting anything around that by the way.  I would argue that most who say they have abilities are over stating things or are deceptive.  It’s difficult to contradict that stuff to say the least but my intuition tells me they’re dishonest.

Have you had a near-death experience? If so, will you share a bit of it.

Not in the NDE way, no.  I was nearly killed by a man trying to stab me in a mugging once and then one time was abducted by a mugger who periodically stroked my neck with a gun barrel but in each case, I got out of it alive.  Makes you think though!  I did have an out-of-body experience once in a time where I was in great spiritual and mortal conflict and thought I might die if something didn’t improve or that I might resort to taking my own life.  My 2nd Spirit as some tribes call it, traveled to the glass ceiling of space and a magnificent large cosmic presence told me, “It’s not your time and you have more work to do” and they hurtled me back into my body. That was NYE 1999 during that whole Y2K nonsense.  There’s a greater story there but think I will save it for my book.

SEDUCTIVE SAVANNAH AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD AND EVIL

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How did you end up in Savannah and how long have you lived there?

Savannah seduced me of course. But in reality, like so many kids, The Savannah College of Art & Design secured me through a scholarship for their Fine Arts program.  However, as I would come to tell people later, “SCAD was the excuse, Savannah was the mission.”  I have lived in Savannah for 27 years total and three off and on or as of 2018 is the case.  I was floored by the beauty of the place, even in its decay.  Just like Lady Astor once said, “Savannah is an angel with a dirty face.”  Now she’s almost too pretty again and a little snooty to be honest.  I had it good in the old days when just the old guard were uppity in a well-earned way.  Now it’s the boutiquers and the trust funders snobbing around. Thank God Bonaventure Cemetery is just full of dead people who don’t care what they look like or much how you do either.  Anyway, I digress.  I fell in love with this living Southern Belle cousin of Williamsburg or something and haven’t much wanted to leave. It’s like waking up in a bed & breakfast every day and the birds sing 24 hours a day. Really, they do.

Was the publishing of John Berendt’s bestselling book, “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil” a catalyst for any part of your career?

Positively and I could talk about it for hours.  And of course, Bonaventure Cemetery is Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil“the Garden” in the title idea and most of the characters are buried out there. One of my first friends was the fine art painter and furniture restorer, Barry Thomas, who is a character in the book described as running the antique shop for Jim Williams and who gave Jackie O the tour of The Mercer House in one chapter.  He was a brilliant painter but sadly died of AIDS in 1994.  I was a fan of his paintings and he introduced me to Jim in the bar of The Olde Pink House which ironically was a gay bar in the beloved mansion and Jim had once owned or was partner in the restaurant bar.  In fact, the mirror above the bar there is still the same.  Eventually Jim became my neighbor and I spent some time around The Mercer House, went to the last Christmas party he held there and before he died, a friend of his hired me to cook a Christmas dinner for he and 11 other gay men and Williams was in attendance, albeit somber.  I cooked them a nine course Christmas dinner.

Most of that circle didn’t discuss darker subjects around me out of respect for my age and of course for Jim.  I think he died just 2.5 months after the dinner.  In some ways I remember him and then in other ways don’t.  But I did get interviewed by Kevin Spacey because of the connection and I feel that Spacey did an excellent job capturing Williams, but the film didn’t flatter it.  I thought at times he was Jim Williams’ ghost (that’s how accurate) and a stage play would’ve been better suited for Spacey.

It was around 1988 that I also met Joe Odom who was heavily in decline, addicted to drugs and alcohol.  He lived across the street from me and then later I saw him all the time dressed in his tuxedo in the middle of the day.  He would invite my tours and I off the streets and play the baby grand piano in The Hamilton-Turner House, which was owned by Nancy Hillis, aka, “Mandy” (Alison Eastwood), in the book, and just as the novel describes, Joe would have his black maid serve us lemonade.  My tourists’ minds were blown away by that but to me this was every day Savannah.  Even when Joe was dying of AIDS, he looked good and he was very vain they say and that was the only upside to his decline, for himself, I understand.

I have distinct recollections of going to Lady Chablis’ house after Club One closed on the weekends.  I’d had gay friends in my youth but never at that level, I guess?  Savannah was the big city to me compared to my hometown in Illinois so people like Lady Chablis were part of this great personality menagerie in Strangevannah and I couldn’t get enough.  It seemed like everything before 9/11 in this country had an innocence to it that isn’t here anymore.  You could get a wristband at a bar at 18 and getting served underage wasn’t a problem.  We’d pile over to Lady Chablis’ house and hang out ‘til she kicked us out and I only had to stumble a few blocks home to Jones Street.

The “career” acceleration moment was when I started dating an older woman who was a native Savannahian but at one time a real power player in the NYC fashion scene and who’d retired back to her hometown.  The author of the novel, John Berendt, was part of her rat pack in NYC in the 1970’s and 1980’s.  I think it was in 1992 that he mailed her the manuscript and I’d catch her looking up and gushing, “OH MY GOD, OH MY GOD!”  And I’d laughingly say, “WHAT!?”  She’d reply, “I can’t tell you!”  Well, she went to Italy at one point and I was house sitting her house and she put the manuscript in the drawer and said, “Don’t read that!” Obviously, I did.  Hah!

It was eye-opening because I didn’t know all these things about the murder trial really.  I was so young then and kind of oblivious.  But I read some stuff that didn’t end up in the book either and of course have my own stories that should’ve been but everyone around here says that and that’s a part of what keeps the book alive too.  Probably my favorite relationship at some level was with the character, Luther Driggers.  For fans of the book they’ll know him as the guy who has the vial of poison and the thing about the flies tethered to his collar like they were his fly circus pets.  Luther wasn’t his real name, but he didn’t want it in the novel, so they changed it. Anyway, he and I were lunchmates and even after he went into the old folks’ home, Sister’s Court, he would write me letters and mail me things.  In hindsight I realize he was passing the torch to me on some of the secrets and I really loved him.  He died in 2002 and is now buried in Bonaventure.

What’s scary is that my own tours out there are just an excuse to go visit all my friends. By the way, Canadians are still the number one buyer of that novel!  Thanks, Canada for keeping me out of hock!  Oh, and if I may be so bold?  By the time this goes live, I will be offering my brand-new tour, “The GOOD & EVIL X” Tour.  You’re the first to hear of it.  It will be offered as a private daytime or evening tour hitting all the key stops relative to the novel from a Bonaventure perspective and it will be completely adults only.  The price itself will reflect the content and a reveal at the end which is worth the ticket price alone if you’re a die-hard fan!

What is your perception of the integrity of the book?

The book is 92% true, 8% fiction.  Or maybe 10%?  But even the fiction isn’t wildly speculative.  The title couldn’t have been more perfect.  Once you really, truly live here, you realize that the light is the most beautiful, but the shadows are the darkest too.  It’s a decent novel but some say, not a great novel.  However, where it’s great, it’s fantastic, and where it’s average, it’s average, in the way a Monet is average in places. It’s like the average stuff doesn’t matter as it’s just glue for the overall picture and it’s a very visual book in the way it’s written and then of course right down to the cover and the alienesque Bird Girl statue and her scales of good and evil.  The magic of the book is that any reader reading it in the early 1990’s might have difficulty fathoming that a place such as Savannah might exist at all and if it did, then they would more than want to visit, and wallah, the understanding of our Tourist Boom.

I think author John Berendt did a fine job and like any artist, wrote it from his own shade of interest levels.  Some have criticized them, but my reply would be, well what do you want from a gay writer about a super closeted society where one gay man kills another? It’s accurate from that level, and John Berendt, admittedly an outsider.  Although Jim Williams dying was perhaps the boon for Berendt because I’m not sure he’d have approved everything for publication had he lived.  Some say Jim’s sister signed off on it and gets royalties to this very day.  Just the story of how the book came together would make for an interesting book.  But for me?  It’s the cover photo by my friend and neighbor, the now deceased, Jack Leigh.  I mean that statue and that image made Midnight in The Garden of Good and Evil a Rosetta Stone of Savannah understanding. And like the power of art or a great image, it gave the book other worldly mojo. The image speaks to the title, and the title back to the image and then it all speaks to The Book. And note that the book hasn’t changed its cover in 25 years whereas tons of novels do.  The publisher KNOWS.  I mean incredible magic.  It would’ve been hard for John Berendt to mess it up but then none of that stuff could’ve clicked without his wordsmithing.  After that? Savannahians needed a good kick in the ass with a book that kind of put the town on trial.

Who is your favorite character in it?

It’s a funny question because some I loved more in the book than in real life and then some, I loved in real life more than in The Book.  On a purely sentimental level, I will go Luther Driggers. On an intellectual level, Jim Williams hands down.  Quite possibly one of the greatest mad geniuses that ever walked the face of the earth and the ultimate dichotomy of all emotions and human experiences and complexity.  If anything, the “Good and Evil” part of the title speaks to him as being both and possibly through a real time bi-polar condition, the struggle of rectifying it all inside of himself or reconciling? Not sure which word is more vital there.  I also think he’s a fascinating case study of an outsider that comes to Savannah, and a great individualist with a progressive attitude, but plugging all that ambition into a town where standing out from the crowd historically was the greatest blaspheme.  Especially if you did it freestanding from the controllers.  If I also sound like I’m speaking from personal experience you’re more than onto me.  So yes, of all the characters, I can most relate to him and even my walk here in Savannah and my movements here, have been influenced by his own trials.  It makes me think of Groucho and the whole, “I don’t want to be a member of a club that would have me as a member.”  Jim pretended to be a member but really despised them the whole time.  I mean he was his own club, but he got too close and then didn’t treat the members of the main club the best.  Maybe they had it coming, maybe they didn’t.  But once you turn your ambition into getting over on others just to have a feeling of power, you’re in a darker space spiritually.  I think that’s where his apple orchard started to rot in a way. Even so, my memories of him are fond on a personal level but I wonder what Jim might have been had he not had such a chaotic desire to get revenge.  He was literally a genius in the fullest sense of the term.

What can you tell us about root doctors and, in particular, the character of Lady Minerva, in Midnight?

Well for a decent amount of money I’ll take you to her grave and perform a ritual with you!  Hah!  I was just out there last weekend, with some mystic friends.  Never a dull minute. But in general?  Root doctors, root men, root women, are the lawyers and doctors for people who put faith in their powers of “heal’n and hurt’n.”

At a glance, they more or less come from the Gullah and Geechee culture of The South’s slave past and their traditions originated in Angola.  So, what they do in part, or represent, is post-African survivalism inside of The United States and quite possibly the most important facet of that or most closely tied to it as far as being on the back of black history in America.

The practice of root in my mind is about the roots they use to help heal people and on occasion, hurt people.  Although I like to think of root doctors in general as goodly people doing a lot of white magic and love spells and money spells and fertility ones more than black magic.  It’s my interpretation that the word “root” is both a nod to the actual roots and then The Bible.  Like it’s the root of their faith and they see Jesus in a way as the ultimate root doctor.  So, this makes it different from the Haitian aspects of vodou or Vodun which is all Underworld based gods and them possessing you.  And yes, there is white magic and healing in that world, but blood work is largely absent from root where it’s fairly standard in Vodun-vodou.

As I try to express to my clients, some 300 years ago or so when those traditions first came to these shores, they probably looked much more distinct…like chefs borrowing recipes.  Hundreds of years later, there’s crossover.  So sometimes you see rituals around here that look like a mix of root, Vodun-vodou, Santeria and Macumba of the Brazilians. I mean let’s face it, it’s a competitive world out there and every chef wants to be different, right?

In any case, when a family in The South determines a child has the gift of discernment, they raise that child in the woods to raise mystery and enhance the powers.  Which is why the old school root workers are very sheepish people, Lady Minerva included, who didn’t ever really feel comfortable with her fame.  Fame is a mixed bag especially if your clients see it as a literal detriment to your powers.  Anyway, they use a lot of cemeteries. They see them as in between places, and kinds of justice courtrooms where yes, the fate of spirits are decided one might say?

So, if you’re doing white magic, you look for the grave of a child 10 years or younger.  If you’re doing hurt’n, the grave of a known criminal, hence, why those rituals are the most expensive. Anyway, Lady Minerva or Minerva as she was commonly known to her people, was a complex character.  It would also take a book to do her justice so this is just scratching the surface.  I feel like it’s both hard for outsiders to have a true sense of her importance and then at the same time, a portion of her reputation relies on the myth. It’s like, was she all that or was it the character that made her more so?  She came from a known family of root doctors and in the family cemetery where she’s buried, many of the headstones say DOCTOR this or that.

Minerva also laid claim to the mantle of power of the great Doctor Buzzard who was the most famous root doctor of all time.  Meaning, she inherited his power at death which might make her a root doctor feminist, as traditionally the mantle goes from male to male.  Some say this is where she went too far even if she and Buzzard did have a romantic relationship when she was younger.  I guess that’s what keeps it all interesting, right?  Certainly, Jim Williams had confidence in her and their relationship is layered with intrigue.  He paid her hundreds of thousands through the years.  I’m also of the understanding that he paid her to help him perform black mass type rituals to bring darkness to his enemies which points to the blood work or Vodun-vodou elements again. I have no proof of that, less on good authority, that I trust.  I also have eye witness testimony to Minerva doing a ritual in the plot of a very powerful family in Bonaventure while Jim was still alive, and I’ll only say that the family name is in the novel itself. Near the end of Jim’s life, it’s said that Minerva and he had a falling out and he cheated Minerva of some back monies owed for devilish services rendered.  He was pretty, plum broke near the end of his life, but he cheated on Minerva by taking up with a Santeria priestess.  Personally, I think that cost him big time.  You don’t want to cross the wrong or right root doctor.  But that is another story for another time, kiddies.  I will just say this…Don’t ever agree to drink blue root tea.

For a fan of the book, this information is pure gold, so thank you very much for sharing it! Fascinating stuff! 

AMERICA’S MOST HAUNTED CITY

Shannon Scott

How did you get involved with the show “Scariest Places on Earth” and the filming of “America’s Most Haunted City” and what was your role in those productions?

I had a friend, Jill Sherrer, who was already a contact in LA, and she called on me from time to time about productions and we had a relationship.  She introduced me to former Power Ranger’s director, Bob Hughes, and we got involved with a motley crew to shoot the pilot episode in Savannah, Alton, Illinois and Athens, Ohio.  I was a story researcher and at first, an assistant producer and all around everything else.  I was 30 and they sent me a million dollars in equipment and were like, “make sure we get this back.”  That was it.  I rocked it for them honestly and then after Fox Family bought a season or three, I asked for a job once Bob Hughes became Co-executive Producer on the series.

So, for two years I did more of the same, albeit I need to re-up my IMDB presence as they’ve shafted me on some credits!  But really, I was in it for the fun and putting Savannah in the spotlight again and so I did even if the corporate suits at Fox made the first episode a little hokey to say the least.  I aided greatly in two episodes here, one, “Savannah Frankenstein,” and then “Haunted Fort Pulaski.”  The cameraman on the latter, Don Burgess, had been the chief cinematographer for Forrest Gump, as he lived in the area. Just a fun fact but it was a wide pool of talent.

After 5-6 years in Hollyweird, doing primarily ghost TV stuff and voiceover work – although the opportunities for me were beyond the pale – I, frankly, was still haunted by Savannah.  I’m a stubborn person and most stubborn for this town for some reason.  The fakery of ghost television was so absurd with a public who just didn’t seem to care or were just having too much fun pretending they didn’t seem to.  As for me, I come from that whole, “Leonard Nimoy’s In Search of…” era and was too much of a purist.  I wanted to do something serious on my own that Hollywood didn’t seem to wanna do at the time or anymore.

After I worked on the first Ghost Hunters episode ever shot out of their home state, I started laying down the track work for my own documentary.  Years earlier I’d started working on it with Savannah friend and feature member of the episode, “Savannah Frankenstein,” Mr. “Hollywood” Ron Higgins, just doing interviews of locals.  That became the spirit of the eventual film, “America’s Most Haunted City,” along with the obvious title being borrowed from the recent history of Savannah receiving that award from The American Institute of Parapsychology in 2002.

Essentially, I wanted to do something that was unfettered by interference of others that seemed more truly local and of my own voice.  It seemed like the film took six years to finish as it was being filmed and edited between other projects going on in four different countries, but I owe a lot to cameraman, Jeremiah Chapman and sound guy, Michael Gordon.  I hated the film for years because it was financially draining and friendship challenging, and it took me another four or five years to accept that I had anything to do with it at all!  I’m my own worst critic and the film is not without flaws, but I think I did everyone and every subject a good and that it’s good for my first film.  One of the cooler things that came out of it was the soundtrack of 12 tracks by Edwin “Blue Ice” Brown of Icebuilt Productions.  He’s a brilliant composer and made the music without me even asking.  He just handed me a soundtrack one day and told me it was just based on all our conversations we had in the Sentient Bean coffeehouse.  I was floored and so when people get the media pack, it has both the 90-minute film and the soundtrack included. I think I’ve moved 20,000 copies in its life so far, so you know, it’s out there.

The tale of the spirit of Rene Rondolia is a popular one in Savannah but in his book, Haunted Savannah: America’s Most Spectral City, author James Caskey says that there was no such person. Do you dispute that claim?

Well good thing you’re asking the in-resident authority on Rene Asch Rondolier.

When I first moved here in 1987, I learned quickly from older locals, that Colonial Park Cemetery in their childhood was called, “Rene’s Playground,” which eventually became the formulation for the S.P.O.E. episode, “Savannah Frankenstein” and Rene’s story is my favorite ghost story of all time.  When I actively gave ghost tours, it was my grand finale or sometimes fear-striking introduction.  As to your question?  It’s funny about some ghost book writers and ghost tour company owners, right?  They do all of that but also admit they have no belief in the subject less that others believe it?  Well OK then.  All the same, I 100% dispute the claim against Rene’s existence and not just specifically Caskey’s, but everyone’s, including those long before Caskey was born.  But permit me to explain why.

There are lots of the hardball facts, guys.  I respect that.  But if anything, Savannah has taught me, the former atheist I might add, who believed “there are absolutes,” is that oral tradition itself is also a genre of fact.  Things are inside of it that live both in fact and in lore.  I poke fun a lot at fact guys or academics with PhDs when it comes to Savannah’s past and what’s fact or not.  I mean look at how many records have been destroyed in fires, hurricanes and then what the Freemasons themselves are concealing and have also lost?  In my research experience, and bearing in mind those facts, I have seen that Savannah, while restoring its buildings, is also only now really learning about what it has been.  Facts are like a jeweler’s lens to peer more deeply but are limited by the magnification and then the seer.  And every seer is different.  There are some objective things available to all and then there are shades of shadow and light, color hues, that are also observable but are fuzzier and more subjective components to the beauty of the object.

It’s like the great historian at UGA, Phinizy Spalding said, “Georgia is the last unpioneered colony of the 13 colonies.”  He was famous for telling his students, “historians can go into Charleston or Georgetown and at best, just follow the research trails of others and expand on what they’ve already done.  In Georgia, a researcher every day of the week can pioneer their own paths and discover treasures at every turn and odds are you’ll be the first to have seen them.  What every tour guide loves about Savannah, or the good ones, is finding a treasure fact one day and sharing it with others the next.  So, without making this a full debate, what I am willing to say here, is this.  I have seen church records noting his birth and the discussion of his deformity and his mother as a grist mill worker.  I have read colonial newspapers from other colonies that discuss his presence in Savannah, using his nickname and a few records of rather famous people who observed him while they were in the city.  And although this is bit off topic, I will lastly tease that I have a humdinger of a sighting of his ghost that was detailed to me directly from the experiencer which clinches it for me.  Rene was real. He was unjustly killed.  His ghost walks and he is King.


BONAVENTURE CEMETERY’S HOLD ON SHANNON SCOTT

Shannon Scott in Bonaventure Cemetery

Shannon Scott by Andrew Montgomery for Lonely Planet


How did you end up working at Bonaventure Cemetery?

Obviously, cemeteries were an interest already and I knew ghost tours would have a shelf life for me, but I had a crazy notion that I wanted to tell ALL of Savannah’s stories in as many venues that I was able.  The sign from above was when in 2001 I noticed no one owned www.bonaventurecemetery.com so I grabbed it, naturally!  Even so, tours as Bonaventure’s first storyteller were sporadic early on.  I knew it would take time to grow. Even in 2010 when I split with a business partner, tour traffic out there was still turning a corner.  However, about five or six years ago it really started to pop.  Now 800,000 tourists a year visit and I’d gander to say it’ll soon be a million.  So yes, smart business move meets selfish love of cemeteries.

What’s the strangest or most unusual thing that has happened on one of your tours that you can share?

I think it varies from the psychic to just the obscene.

On the night I opened Sixth Sense Savannah Ghost Tours in 2002, I received some validation from Savannah’s spirit world.  I was the first to give ghost tours South of Liberty Street and I lived on E. Jones and Abercorn.  I’d been living in that house of 1852 for about two years and my roommate and I had seen the ghost of a female in the home from time to time who was very life like and seemed very busy doing her chores.  At that point I had not spoken the name that I’d received, “Eliza,” to a solitary soul.  Nor had I intended to make my actual residence a stop on my own tour.  But you might say the home invited itself.

We were a half block from my house by Clary’s Cafe and there were two couples behind me talking about their day in Savannah and I’m thinking on my next story stop so their conversation is sort of white noise.  But I pay more attention to this woman from Texas on my tour because she had a twang in her speech and she was saying something like this, “Yeah, we were down on River Street at this gallery and I found the perfect print and had it framed and it’s going to go over the couch; and you remember the one honey it was the – ELIZA WANTS US TO TALK ABOUT HER!”  Now I stop, mid-thought, with my back still turned to them.  I start turning and saying, “Wait, you didn’t just say…?”  And the woman has her hand over her mouth, her eyes bulging out and she says, “I don’t know what just made me want to say that, but Eliza wants us to talk about her?”  And I said, “Well what if I told you?” At that point I felt Eliza wanted us to come into the parlor and as I was seeking to take ghost tours to the next level…wallah, the first ever ghost tour in a haunted house in Savannah was born!

The old saying is that ghosts want to be acknowledged and I felt this was the invite moment for sure, so I took them into the parlor and told them what my roommate Gerome and I had seen, etc.  Nothing happened, but after the tour, the couple hung out in the kitchen for a while.  They’d been married 25 years and she was a nurse with empathic abilities, but she’d never told her husband even as much as they seemed like a very together couple.  That night she confessed, and he had such a face!  Kind of like, “Hey 25 to life, I love her, what’ya gonna do?”  However, I remember she said to him, “Honey, you know how I collect those old wooden kitchen stirring spoons?  Well, when I squeeze the handles?  Sometimes I can feel their energies and even see who they were!” She was a legit empath and noted that the same happened to her in her profession of touching patients.  She was sometimes treated to a whole cavalcade of sensory information.  She noted that in antique shops, objects of glass, metal, wood gave her the same although like some batteries, they were dead or faint or yes, full of charge!  So that night, my first ghost tour under my own moniker gave the tour something unique, brought a great couple closer together, gave a spirit satisfaction and then for me it was like Eliza saying, “You go with your ghost tour company, boy!” 

Painting of Shannon Scott by Cheryl Solis

Painting of Shannon Scott surrounded by spirits of Bonaventure by Cheryl Solis

Whose grave at Bonaventure holds the most special place in your heart and why?

That changes by the decade depending on who has died.  I’ve loved so many people and keep them alive on my tour as we stop by some of their graves.  But two of the most important – and I wish they were on my tour more often – Ron, “Hollywood Ron” Higgins buried in the Greenwich section, and then famed historian and former Smithsonian archivist, Paul Blatner.  Both died far too young. Ron at 45 of a massive heart attack and Paul at 58 I think from a heart attack that had elements of brown recluse spider bite complications mixed in with his diabetic condition. I loved both men dearly, like brothers, although Paul was more of a mentor as he was older when we met when I was 18.

I met Paul first in his famous antique collectible shop, Blatner’s Antiques.  It was the ultimate rummage store meets hoarder hovel meets tax shelter.  This guy was a character who had everything from the rifle surrendered to Sherman with Savannah’s capture to a baton of power given by Hitler to his successor, Dönitz, and many things beyond that.  He was the king of bottle diggers and bottle collectors.  He was a bard in his own right and for most of his shop’s life by Clary’s Cafe, well I lived over it at one point and then on the same corner for 14 years.  He also started The Savannah History Museum.  He taught me much, gave me much in terms of my own collection and we’d hang in the shop for hours talking history, Savannah, the world and of course, women. He lived vicariously through my stories as a man about town.  I miss him and his closing words at his shop at 5 PM, “IT’S CLOSIN’ TIME!”  Even now at The Smithsonian, some of the African American art objects on display from the Gullah Geechee culture, particularly the ritual and burial ones, are some of the most valuable in their collection. The burial ones might be considered priceless.

As to “Hollywood Ron” Higgins?  He was Savannah’s tourism mayor, and everyone loved Ron. The guy had two funerals really.  One Catholic and one Jewish.  He’d gone to UCLA film school, toured with Michael Jackson and seemed to just kick around with major celebs; personally worked on “Training Day.”  We were coffee house pals and part of our daily routine in the early 90’s, was just sitting there talking like old men about what was going on in the town and what we felt Savannah could be or we could do with it.  We were each other’s mentors.  Eventually, I helped him get started with his own cutting-edge company, Savannah Movie Tours which was a stunning accomplishment for all the movie scene visuals incorporated into the tour.  I was part of the tour with the Scariest Places on Earth show we were both in and on the tour, he’d stop the bus and make me get on to say hello to everyone like I was a celebrity sighting! Oh, man.  I literally pictured us as old men in rocking chairs one day like some sort of man couple looking back on our lives, still talking about the future.  And then he was gone at 45.  His headstone features a bench and an illustration done by Mark Streeter showing him sitting on the Forrest Gump bench and looking up at the stars.  That’s the one death I’ll never come to accept. All his friends talk about his infectious giggle and I hear it all the time.  My heart aches now just talking about it.

I know your ring is very special to you as you’ve included it in your last two posters for Bonaventure.  What does that ring symbolize?

It’s the ring of The Rosicrucian Order.  It features a chevron, an ankh, a cross with the 2018-08-24 22.04.22rose.  It was made in Egypt.  It’s my spiritual discipline in some sense and the oldest one in the world if you really track it correctly. They’ve had names like The Rosea Crucis, The White Brotherhood and others; their traditions steeped in the Essene and further back.  They recognize Jesus Christ as Master Jesus or the ultimate disciple and avatar for good.  In fact, they had much to do with his education on Mount Carmel and many other things that are not considered proper Bible teachings yet, but should be in my opinion.  At core, love is the religion and not much more complicated than that.  I found it through my sleuthish nose you could say.

As a kid, I was immensely taken with Ben Franklin, Nostradamus, and later, Sir Francis Bacon.  But I noted that lots and lots of famous creative, inventor types were part of this order but even their best biographers only footnoted it.  Now I understand that even those writers had missed out on how it connected to the achievements of those people and how it’s also easy to miss at the same time.  It almost has a secret history of being non-secret.  It’s just that the students or disciples don’t overly discuss it or make it a part of their general spoke identity in the way someone might say, “I’m a Christian” or “I go to that church or this one.”  Rosicrucianism promotes deeds as the mark of character and with as little ego involved as possible or maybe in the way people use institutions to somehow give them automatic or quasi credibility?  So, it’s fairly humble in most aspects.

Where I tend to depart with them is on their view of politics or the passive involvement due to their prophecy beliefs.  Just like most of us wouldn’t stand for someone beating up an old lady, I’m not prone to sit on my hands and see my country beat up.  I’m not sure if that makes me an outsider or not.  Probably, but that’s okay.  I mean Jesus was.  Are you familiar with the controversial Georgia Guidestones?  They were built by a Rosicrucian and let me just say, they’re not advocating a New World Order but the complete opposite. However, you can’t understand Georgia Guidestones without being well into the understanding of the order and it takes a while.  I’ll put it this way, I’ve seen and learned some of the wildest things and the most beautiful things because of it.

No, I am not familiar with either The Rosicrucian Order or the Georgia Guidestones. I have some extensive studying to do!

Have you been to Père Lachaise and if so, what is your most interesting memory of it?

Yes, and Montmartre and many others.  The most interesting thing is that I’m the guy who stole the penis off Oscar Wilde’s monument.  Feel free to print that.  I kid of course. But I think it’s fascinating that a number of people buried there, like Oscar Wilde and Isadora Duncan had Savannah and Bonaventure Cemetery moments.  From Isadora dancing on the stage at The Savannah Theater to Oscar Wilde sleeping in Bonaventure for two nights of his three-night stay in Savannah.  Which is why I chose to sleep in Père Lachaise for two nights.  It wasn’t easy but at this point, I’m a pro at the “after hours” cemetery thing. 

THE GULLAH GEECHEE

Gullah art by Diane Britton Dunham

Gullah art by Diane Britton Dunham, originally published at http://gullah.tv/what-is-gullah/

I know that you are drawn to the Gullah Geechee culture. Can you talk a bit about that and why it is special to you?

Yes, or as I call them, the most fascinating people you’ve never heard of.  Which is part of their appeal to me.

Being the keeper of something not everyone knows and as storyteller that kind of thing is tantamount.  We LOVE LOVE LOVE being the people to turn you onto a subject worth knowing about.  You know popping your story cherry kind of thing.  Also, despite what some people think about me these days, my heart always lays with the underdog story. The journey from birth to death, rags to riches and all the rest.  The journey of self and through it all.  And yes, that story often made even more monumental through the lens or reflection of America.  Plus, what could be better than a mysterious culture hidden behind the veils of Spanish Moss in The Deep South?  Thank you.  Not to mention my history books were devoid of greater slave narratives.  I had the whole “people in bonds” thing in my mind and nothing else.  It was made rather generic and possibly safe.

Savannah and The Low Country in general is a history eye-popper and turns a lot of what we know or cling to or think we know about events, upside down.  I mean you get here and learn about these willful people who arrived as slaves but very early on stole back their freedom, earned it, bought it and then as early as the 1780’s had real business and political power in Savannah.  Until I learned that stuff I was like, “they came from Africa, worked, died and then everyone got freed in 1865.”  I had no other information. So yes, here’s where you come to get it.  They have their own indigenous language recognized finally by The Federal Government in 1940, I believe, a kind of secret language that helped them as people from many tribes, speak and communicate around their controllers.  Some of those words are found in our language like the number one word of all rappers, “chillun.”  Also, culturally, I clearly grew up white albeit in the very mixed world of The Midwest where unless you live in a large city, black kids are just your friends, neighbors, playmates, fellow churchgoers and all your parents are friends. You don’t see race or only in an appreciation for differences that make everyone unique. Even so, as a kid I loved the electric energy, passion and soul of black people and admired their athletics obviously.  But it’s only until you come to a place like The Low Country that you can start to see more of their cultural origins and so you might even say that Savannah is halfway between my home state of Illinois and Africa in some sense. This is as close as I’m gonna get unless I cross the ocean.  I also think my Midwestern values made me less judgmental in a city of 61% black.  Like I’ll talk to anybody.  And some didn’t know how to take that while others found me refreshing.  It’s all about basic respect and showing a desire to share and that you also have something to share.  That’s what life’s about.  Civility and exchange.  Or should be.

My point is that my attitude opened a lot of doors and early on made acquaintances with everyone from Civil Rights activist, W.W. Law to root doctors like Angel Hakim and Mama Tilda. I knew in some cases that in order to understand ritual sites I found in cemeteries, I had to go to people who knew those things.  And they showed me stuff because my heart was in the right place and they knew I wanted to know some new truths.  I also loved moving to a city where “black” people, but are really Gullah or Geechee, would be walking down the street singing out loud like nobody was looking or yelling across the street to each other like they were in the same room.  White people don’t do that generally, although in The South maybe a bit more so.  It’s like we’re just one big family and hey, like the old saying goes, “if you’ve got a song in your heart, let it out!”  That might be the best statement about Gullah and Geechee peoples.  They’ve got lots of passion and lots of music and vibration to share!  And the Geechee in particular, love to share knowledge and anything that is life.  They can also cook food like a mofo. I’m fairly certain I’m part Gullah Geechee now.  Hah!

SECRET OR NOT SO SECRET SOCIETIES

Bonaventure Cemetery Love Truth & Stories

Bonaventure Cemetery Love Truth & Stories poster by Shannon Scott

Are you a Freemason?

Epic fail!  You can never ask one if they are, don’t you know that? Hah! I’ll put it to you this way. I’m a truth seeker who enjoys sharing knowledge with anyone open enough and I stay far far away from any Lord of The Mist.

Will you expound upon your beliefs about The Illuminati?

How much time do you have?  This might be better as Part Deux.

The Illuminati was both a literal historical organization in Europe and then a modern name-for-all that points to controllers in shadow operations influencing civilization through government, banking, education, religious and other cultural organizations. Today they represent 300 families more or less that rule the world and see themselves as high priests whose bloodline must survive at all turns.  There are 13 families at the top of the pyramid, one for every step you see on the back of the U.S. dollar as well.  They see everyone else as fodder for their efforts and that they are destined inheritors of the earth.  Crazy, right?  But it’s very scarily true.

In Europe today, they’re generally just called The Group and, in the USA, known as The Order. They have some private names for their gangs and then very public ones.  Which is partly what they’re required to do.  They observe that true ritual power is doing everything in plain sight. They cannot do evil to you generally if you don’t accept it or allow them to do it.  One of the three offices that The Illuminati ordered to be established, was by Satanist, Albert Pike, in Charleston, SC.  Another being Bohemian Grove in California.  A third location is still unknown to me, but I think I’ve set eyes on where it was or is located and it’s my intent to vet that more in the coming years. The mansion I’ve seen in Charleston has its own iron Gates of Hell entrance and doesn’t hide the fact.  Their history is complex and convoluted too…but to understand secret societies at one level…

Ideas outside of certain churches and governments and the cultural institutions of history did indeed imprison minds and hearts of men, because to express them, they, along with their families might be mocked, blackmailed, reputations ruined and even put to death.  This really is in some sense, what drove certain men to go “underground” and cooperate there, swearing secrecy to each other but that they would use their roles in society or offices to advance their ideas and to promote each other within the ranks and so on.  Which you could say is where we see the advent or reinvention of certain secret words, gestures and handshakes to identify each other, which is also not unlike The Freemasons.

All these kinds of groups from what I can tell, including The Rosicrucian, have ties to the mystery schools of Egypt.  It’s where all these groups are rooted in what they do.  But as “The Devil is in the details”, it’s how those organizations have traveled, translated and evolved throughout the centuries.  Some remain benevolent while others become, or some might argue, stay, extremely evil, like The Illuminati.  Maybe it was corrupt from the start or just became corrupt later but at some point, in its history, Satanists were well in charge.  History shows some of these organizations as having been co-opted by darker influences and then they rewired the groups to function on the outside as something good but these “priest classes” then use the lower level members to advance what are sinister agendas without their knowledge.  Which is part of the ritual power play, especially among The Illuminati.  We see that now in Hollywood and pop culture.

Also, it is very important to note that for The Illuminati, blood and bloodlines are everything and I want the readers to absorb this next sentence.  They will literally do ANYTHING, say anything, deceive anyone, murder anyone and put on any kind of face in any circle in order to preserve their bloodline.  There is no moral marker higher than that for them.  Anyone not of the families is seen as expendable.  Most normal people have no concept of what this means spiritually because it’s too deep and too dark and not something anyone wants to conceive of or think of. But they are here in the world all around us carrying out these evil acts and many of them are known to the American public and around the world in certain realms of power.  All one has to do is track their family heritage.

I get lots of weird looks, trust me, when I speak of household names because it seems too out there.  But the reason most people don’t recognize them as villains necessarily is because of most people’s unfamiliarity with “programming.”  Very key word.  It’s essentially about stripping someone down morally, so viciously, by abusing them psychologically, sexually, and physically and then programming them back up with the morality and response recognition that you want them to have or that the Illuminus require.  Then they will have a public face that is seemingly flawless, and they’re made to be a person everyone wants to know and is drawn to.  It’s all very Manchurian Candidate but mind control isn’t new, it’s centuries old.  There are some public figures in high places of power that are known, programmed individuals and as they are, I despise them, loathe and revile them.  Yet I also have empathy for them because I know very evil adults did very evil things to them to make them that way.  And sacrificing children, even their own, is part of the ritualism.

This is largely why 800,000 children in The United States vanish annually.  Some of them for their sex rituals and some for their bloodlust ones.  It’s a national and international crisis but sadly some of the 300 names of the Illuminati, belong to media moguls and of course, their protective political leaders.  I mean, let’s face it, try walking up to someone and saying, “Hey did you know that people on Capitol Hill take planes over to Europe and pay thousands to beat kids to death with ball pin hammers?”  Try using that one as an icebreaker some time.  Exactly, this stuff makes people’s brains hurt and their insides scream.  This is why you don’t want to be in my head.

As I told a woman on my tour recently, “If someone were to write The Bible today, this is the stuff that would be in that Bible and would be taught for the next 2000 years.”  I’m sad that it’s not. People routinely ask me what I want on my own headstone.  It would be something to the effect that I did everything in my power to wake people to the evils of The Illuminati and that the reader should do everything in their living power to recognize them and stop them.  It’s really a courage most people lack and sadly, with fluoridated brains, no longer possess deeper critical levels to even understand.

So, to that I say, “Forgive them Father for they know not what they are doing.”  I often use the expression, “Bridge the gap.”  Or like Morrison sang, “Break on through to the other side!”  If I could re-teach America’s children, or open The Shannon Scott School For Kids Who Can’t Read Good, I would strip down the historical narratives taught to children by the Illuminati institutions and I would teach every American or yes, every human, the real history of the world by illustrating where The Illuminati corrupted it or how events tie into their operations.  If we and all the children of the world were educated this way, I assure you the world would not be in the trouble it is currently in because we’d be a much more awake, loving, enlightened, civil and just society.  We would not allow these people to walk the earth.

Everything you see in the media now is a spiritual war from The Illuminati raging against those waking up and taking power away from them.  If more people were educated in these secret society respects, they’d realize that.  But instead it’s division by design and The Illuminati using our humanity against us by pitting us against each other. And as much as some want to think it, Trump isn’t connected.  As Newt Gingrich brilliantly said when Trump was running, “He hasn’t done their rituals.”  That flew over the heads of most, but it didn’t mine because I knew he meant it literally.  Trump also recently made fun of George Bush’s “1000 Points of Light” rhetoric from his time as President.  This was historically UGE!  Why?  Because it’s a Devil concept of their New World Order agenda and Trump made fun of it.  He acted like he wasn’t being that serious, but he was.  It was him using their media to say, “I’m going to take you down.” We’d all better buckle up too.  They’ll stop at nothing to keep control of the world.  My money is that they lose but at what cost to the rest of us?

Holy crap! This stuff will keep you up at night if you think about it too much! I’m almost sorry I asked but I appreciate you being so frank in your response. I am still processing all of this information.

AND NOW FOR SOMETHING LIGHTER…

I think it is time for some lighter questions and as this is a blog to promote recording artists and authors…

Who is your favorite author? Book?

I have a soft spot for the author buried in Bonaventure Cemetery, Harry Hervey, who wrote the original Midnight in The Garden of Good and Evil styled book, “The Damned Don’t Cry.”  He was brilliant, fun, odd, and had a powerful command of the English language.  But in general, my favorite favorite author is Victor Hugo and his book, “Ninety-Three.”  It’s Hugo at his finest and briefest, showing that the most seemingly unimportant person can be the hero.

Who is your favorite band? Singer?

Again, asking to pick my favorite kids.  So, I’m not going to.  I have a real love for “the sentimental genius,” Lloyd Cole and of course, Lloyd Cole and the Commotions.  His album Love Stories was like my life soundtrack in Savannah and his music takes me to that good, pure, decent, human place.  After that?  It’s Steve Kilby from The Church and throw in some Danzig for good measure and it’s a great car ride in the countryside.

What does a guy like you do for Halloween?

I live in Savannah, Georgia and just like Al Jourgensen says, “Every day is Halloween.”  I just act normal that day to be different.

And finally … What’s next for Shannon Scott Tours?

Shannon Scott

Photo of Shannon Scott by Jason Burgess

Well, some of it I want to be a surprise, but my goal in life is that one day you’ll go to my website at www.shannonscott.com and you’ll see that I’m touring in a new city in their cemetery.  I want to be the first person and maybe only person in history who can say he’s permanently on tour rocking it out in cemeteries for the public.  And I hope to have a following so that when you hear I’m in your town, the masses will show up for it.  After all, I am the ultimate grown up Goth kid and this is what we do.  But expect lots of books and art and gatherings to keep my version of Savannah one of the most interesting corners or versions of the island for people to experience!

Shannon, you have been more than generous with your time and I cannot thank you enough for sharing so much of yourself with me and my readers. You have given us so much food for thought in a world where the quest for spiritual enlightenment is at war with the all-powerful fear mongers who wish to keep us in the dark. You have my heartfelt best wishes for continued success with your career and personal goals. Love and light to you, always.

In Conversation with Wayne Byrne, Author of The Cinema of Tom DiCillo: Include Me Out

Title: The Cinema of Tom DiCillo: Include Me Out
Author:  Wayne Byrne
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Released: September 2017
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9780231185356

The Cinema of Tom DiCillo

As the author of this insightful and entertaining book, he delves in deep and comes up with the goods. Through his conversations with Tom we see the thought processes and strategies on each of his films, his hopes and frustrations, and everything in between. One thing about Tom, he doesn’t hold back. We also hear from many of Tom’s collaborators, and he has worked with some of the best in this business.

In short, this wonderful book details the ultimate triumphant journey of one of independent cinema’s smartest, funniest and fiercest warriors. ~ Steve Buscemi


As a long-time fan of the award-winning, independent, New York filmmaker and recording artist, I was very excited to be among the first readers of Wayne Byrne’s well-written, fascinating, detailed analysis of The Cinema of Tom DiCillo.  Irish author Wayne Byrne’s book is comprised of a series of essays about each of DiCillo’s eight films – Johnny Suede, Living in Oblivion, Box of Moonlight, The Real Blonde, Double Whammy, Delirious, When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors, and Down in Shadowland – embellished with insider insight from some of the films’ stars.

Wayne, congratulations on your auspicious debut as a writer! I read somewhere that you never intended to be a writer, so how was it that you became one?

Thank you, Christine.  It’s such a great feeling whenever I hear those words.  It reminds me that the book is a real thing.  I’m getting used to the thrill of walking into a book store and seeing it on the shelf.

What I meant by that reference to never intending to be a writer was that I never consciously set out to become one, in the sense that I never said, “I would love to be a  writer when I grow up,” nor ever pursued it academically.  It just wasn’t on my radar when wondering what to do with myself.  I always thought writers were Ivy League academic types, an exclusive club that I would never be privy to, and my not being academically inclined meant it was just never a consideration.

I wrote this book out of necessity.  I wanted to own a book on Tom DiCillo and for that to happen I had to write it myself.  That is the essence of the “accidental writer” quote you are referring to.

Even though writing is now my life, there’s an element of accident, or perhaps fate, to my professional breakthroughs.  At some stage many years ago, I started writing my own movie reviews for nothing other than the fun of cataloging what I was watching.  At the suggestion of my friend I submitted this massive portfolio of amateur scribbling to the editor of a newspaper just for the sake of doing something with them.  I didn’t think anything would come of it, and looking back on those writings now, I’m surprised something did.  The editor replied to set up a meeting with me.  So, I went in and he pretty much hired me then and there as their film critic and columnist.  I couldn’t believe it!  I did that for two years, before the Arts pages were cut from the paper to allow for more advertising inches.  But it was the springboard for my professional writing career.

I’m currently a music journalist, again not something I intentionally set out to do.  I was asked by the editor of a highly-regarded magazine here in Ireland called Hot Press if I would be interested in joining them as a regular contributor.  This was after I had sold to them what I thought was a one-off freelance piece that I wrote about a musician friend of mine.  I’ve been an avid reader of that magazine for twenty years so it’s very exciting to now be part of it.  What an honor to be asked to join them.

I’m familiar with Hot Press as I’ve been to Ireland three times and read it while I was there. It’s an excellent magazine! I think that being a music journalist is possibly one of the coolest jobs in the world. Do you still have fun with it or is it simply work?

Oh I absolutely have fun. Of course there are occasions where you don’t necessarily like a band that you are reviewing, either live or their album, or you’re not familiar with an artist that you have to interview, but you have to be fair and diligent and go do your homework and have some context going in.  Often I end up very surprised that I like an album that I would normally have reservations about.  If I’m unfamiliar with a band who I’m reviewing I will often go and listen to their back catalogue.  But yes, I am fully aware of how cool a job it is.  Getting paid to go to a Morrissey concert or listen to the new Weezer album?  Hell yes!  But it is an important magazine and I treat it as such, with absolute professionalism.

Can you speak to your process as a writer? Where do you like to write? Do you listen to music when you’re writing?

My process has certainly changed over time, having become busier and juggling various writing jobs. When I began writing The Cinema of Tom DiCillo, I wasn’t under any contract, I had no publishing deal, and so I had no deadline.  While there was a certain level of uncertainty there in not knowing if all of this work was ever going to be published or not, it also gave me complete freedom of time and effort.  It allowed me to write the book I truly wanted to write.  It meant I could wait for people to become free to interview them.  If a very busy actor said they could talk to me in two months that was fine, I would wait, rather than having to move on without them.  Only when I was ready and happy with my book, and had satisfactorily covered everything I wanted to, did I say, “it’s finished!”  It took me nearly five years, from developing the idea, research, interviews, writing, editing, getting a publishing deal, proofreading the final text, arranging the illustrative materials, coordinating all the Interview Release Forms, and then seeing it published.

It sounds like a long time, but it is time-consuming, especially in wanting it to be of an extremely high quality and a definitive study of Tom’s work, and I was also learning to become a writer as I wrote.  I have no formal training and I’ve never taken a class on writing or literature; I learned as I was doing it.  I don’t know if that would work for everyone, but it worked for me.  And after it was finished, I submitted the manuscript to some publishing houses and there weren’t too many people I sent it to before I got the reply that I wanted.  I knew I wanted to sign with Columbia because they own Wallflower Press, an imprint that has released some of the absolute best books on films and directors.  It was the company I had always wished would release a book on Tom DiCillo. And now they have, but I wrote it, which is still surreal to me.

I tend to write exclusively, at home. If I don’t have my easy chair by the fireplace, then I don’t write. I don’t listen to music while working on the books, but when I’m writing about a specific film I will have it playing in the background, so I can jump in at any time to analyze a particular scene for any number of reasons: thematically, aesthetically, technically.

But when writing for the magazine I do listen to music, because I have to if I’m discussing a particular album or song, and so I will inevitably end up hearing something, some small musical flourish or nuance in a song that I didn’t hear upon first listen but I can now work it into the article or review.

One thing that you and I have in common is that we have both met Tom DiCillo and have had the pleasure of getting to know him. How did you initially meet Tom and how long did you know him before you decided to write a book about his films?

My first contact with Tom was just as a fan, contributing conversation to his blog posts. Soon enough I had cause to contact him in a professional capacity to request an interview for the release of When You’re Strange, as I was writing about it in my coverage of various film festivals.  The idea for the book came about a year into being acquainted with Tom personally, having written him several times and covered his work for various publications.  It was during this period that I mentioned to Tom that I had wanted to buy a book on his work for many years but all I could find were some career overviews in film encyclopedias and reference books; no books wholly devoted to him.  So, at some stage I put forward the idea that I wanted to write the first book on his career.

As Tom is my favorite director, I knew I was in this rare position of being able to talk to him and pick his brain.  Before I began the actual work I experienced some moments of insecurity, not knowing a single thing about how to write a book, and I started questioning how you go about doing that – do you have to go to college to be a writer? How do you become a published author?  I really didn’t know how the whole system of professional writing worked.  But when Tom gave me his blessing and support it encouraged me to just go for it, to write it and worry about becoming published later.

How difficult was it to gain access to the actors that you interviewed for the book?

Not difficult at all, thankfully, for 99% of them.  In almost all cases Tom introduced me personally to the actor and we talked and arranged everything between us.  Brad Pitt was a different story.  There was a team of “people” I had to maneuver through. I would get some positive responses such as “Brad is considering it but is very busy at the moment and will get back to you.”  This went on for a period of time and at this stage I was close to finishing the book.  I felt it was just about ready, so spending more time waiting on responses from people was starting to drag the whole endeavor out.  I asked once more, stating that I needed to know if Brad was in or out because I had to finish the book and they came back and said Brad had, after carefully considering it, decided he could not contribute at that time.  While it wasn’t the answer I would have liked, especially after the kernels of hope I had received, I appreciated that it was at least a firm answer.

Who would you say provided you with the most detailed insight into Tom’s process as a filmmaker, aside from Tom?

It’s hard to name any one person.  Everyone brought their own great insights into Tom, but Catherine Keener, Steve Buscemi, and Chris Noth gave me perhaps the most detailed account of what Tom is like as a person and as a filmmaker, because they have either worked with him a lot or have known him for a long time.  In the case of Chris Noth, he and Tom’s friendship goes back to their acting class and cater-waiting days in the early-eighties.  Chris gave me so much insight.  We spoke at length about their very long friendship, reminiscing about the old days of trying to make it in movies in New York in the 1980s, and their time working together on Law & Order.  Likewise, Steve Buscemi has known Tom since around that time as well and so there’s a great history there between them.

What was the most surprising thing that you learned about him?

It was fascinating to discover the intimate details of his life before the films and the fame: his background, his family life, his influences, his world view, and the relationships created early on with other artists.  It was those more personal moments that were revelatory, and very interesting and rewarding to me as a writer.  No detail was too minor or superfluous.  It all added up to help me create what I hope is a definitive work of this great artist.

I believe your book is the definitive work about Tom DiCillo.

I really appreciate that, Christine. I’m happy to have written something that would be considered Wayne Byrnedefinitive, but I also always look forward to any other film commentators or scholars writing about Tom, I would always be interested to hear of other people’s opinions on the films, maybe spotting something I didn’t see or analyzing something from a different perspective.  The great thing about any arts criticism is that it’s completely subjective.  Every person brings their own personal history and sensibilities to their experience of a work that makes it exclusively their own. What I see in Tom’s work could be completely different to what another writer sees, and I would always be interested to hear what other people see in his work.

I find it difficult to pick a favorite of Tom’s films, can you?

It depends on what day of the week it is.  I find it hard to pick one favorite, but I do know the ones I connect most immediately with for different reasons.  Johnny Suede will always be the most important film for me, so it is probably my personal favorite, as it was the film that opened my eyes to cinema.  It’s because of that film that we’re having this interview.  While Living In Oblivion is perhaps the definitive DiCillo film, being so perfect in every way, and being released at the time it was, it’s such a crucial piece of American Independent Cinema.  But, objectively speaking, I do think that Delirious is a frontrunner as his best work.

That said, I have programmed Tom’s films at many events (festivals, clubs, etc.) and the film that most people tell me is their favorite is Box of Moonlight.  Something about that film really clicks with audiences.  What Al Fountain (John Turturro) experiences in that film is probably something many people experience in their lives at some point, and Tom pulls it off with such cinematic skill, a deft surrealist aesthetic, and with great humor and pathos, those elements which are so distinctly DiCillo.

I agree with you about Delirious.

It’s a masterpiece. It has such a vital energy, such a range of emotion, and a stunning command of style. Tom was really firing on all cylinders on that one; the performances speak for themselves, and it has some of the best scenes of Tom’s entire catalogue.  For me it is easily the best American film of the last decade. Certainly it’s my favorite film to come out since Stanley Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut.

For me, one of the things I enjoyed the most about your book was that you elaborated on the themes that run throughout Tom’s films. Can you reiterate those themes for my readers?

Yes, of course.  It is one of the main objectives of the book, to acknowledge and analyze the crucial and relevant themes that run throughout Tom’s films.  I have always been very unsatisfied with critical commentary of Tom’s work, because very few, if any, acknowledge the themes at the heart of the films.  Rather, they look to the immediate context of satire, trying to pick up on sly digs here and there at these venerated institutions, painting Tom as purely an iconoclast.  And that’s fine, but there is so much more to Tom’s films than that.  I think a lot of critics overlook the pathos of Tom’s work.

Look at the thread of familial discord that runs through from Johnny Suede right up to Down in Shadowland.  Even When You’re Strange, a film about The Doors, shares many of the same themes as other DiCillo films, such as the illusion of fame, the fragility of ego, identity crises, the severed connection of family and the toll that takes on someone.  It’s amazing that all of these ideas remain present in a documentary ostensibly about one of the biggest rock bands of the last fifty years. Because of Tom’s ability to weave these deeply personal themes throughout, the film becomes less an objective biography of a band, but, for those familiar with DiCillo and his work, a very intimate portrait of two artists: Jim Morrison and Tom DiCillo.

You’re so right!  That’s something I’ve never been able to put into words, but you’ve nailed it. When You’re Strange is how I first connected with Tom so it will always have a special place in my heart as a result, but I also happen to be a big Doors fan.

I was very familiar with The Doors but never a “fan”.  But, testament to the power of Tom’s film, I am now a fan.  I now deeply admire their mysterious style of music and their prodigious musicianship.  I love the whole social and political historical context that was going on around them, which makes them a fascinating band to write about. The chapter on When You’re Strange is one of my favorite chapters in the book.  I interviewed drummer John Densmore and guitarist Robby Krieger for it, which is a pretty cool thing, to have those guys in there.

I love that you mention how wonderfully eclectic the soundtrack to Box of Moonlight (Wall of Voodoo, Peter Murphy, Nick Cave) is as it was a highlight for me.  One of the things that so attracted me to Tom’s personal music project, The Black and Blue Orkestre, was how his musical influences resonated throughout their first album. Tom’s taste in music really endeared me to him. Do you feel the same way?

Tom’s involvement in music is very important to me and to our friendship.  We have spent a lot of time working on music together.  I played guitar and piano on the Black and Blue Orkestre track In Your Dreams.  I’m very proud of it.  It was very exciting working with Tom on vocals and the actor Kevin Corrigan on bass – my job was made easier working with such skilled performers.  I love Tom’s voice and the sonic universe that he creates.  It just makes you want to grab the guitar and start recording, it’s so inspiring.

Tom’s use of music in his films is also wonderful, it is so crucial to the tone and atmosphere that he creates.  And the fact that he uses some of my favorite bands – such as those you just mentioned – just sweetens the deal.

I had no idea that you played guitar and piano on In Your Dreams!  That’s fantastic! I can’t wait for Tom to release the new songs that he’s recording with The Black and Blue Orkestre. Have you collaborated with him on any of them?

Thank you, I appreciate that. Yes, that song is pretty amazing.  I love how Tom mixed that song, it sounds terrific.  I have worked on a number of tunes, but I’m not sure what songs will end up on the next release, as this is Tom’s project and I just came in and did some guitar.  I like that session player aspect of working with the bones of a track, fleshing out the sound and my work is done.  Tom then does his production and engineering work on it and I just look forward to hearing the finished version just like any other fan.

Who are some of your favorite recording artists?

Music is a big part of me.  I love everything from 1930s dance bands, to 60s surf music, to 80s pop, to hardcore punk.  I’m inspired by every kind of music.  If you are over at my house for dinner or a beer, you could hear anything from The Circle Jerks to Slim Whitman to John Denver to Madonna.  I’ve started collecting vinyl, so I’m going back to albums I really love and relishing the great sound of records, so I’ve recently been listening to the first two albums from Bruce Hornsby and The Range (The Way It Is and Scenes from the Southside), Heartbeat City by The Cars, Lives in the Balance by Jackson Browne, Diesel and Dust by Midnight Oil, Court and Spark by Joni Mitchell.

I know I probably sound like some nostalgic dinosaur pining for my lost youth, when there is a whole world of new music out there, but I hear enough of the new stuff in my job writing for Hot Press (legendary Irish music magazine), so when I’m home and relaxing I tend to listen to the albums that continue to thrill and comfort.  I’m tragically unhip when it comes to music – I just like what I like.

My favorite albums would include:

Tango in the Night by Fleetwood Mac
Midnight to Midnight by The Psychedelic Furs
Déjà vu by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young
Book of Love by Book of Love
Heaven on Earth by Belinda Carlisle
Candy Apple Grey by Husker Du
Heaven or Las Vegas by The Cocteau Twins
In My Tribe by 10,000 Maniacs
Famous Monsters by The Misfits
Straight to Goodbye by Pale Divine

Wow, that’s an eclectic collection of favorite albums, but I love it!  If it’s any consolation, I’m probably just as tragically unhip when it comes to music because I still love listening to 70s and 80s music the most but maybe that’s the same for everyone who came of age in a certain time period.  The music of our youth remains special to us forever.  Are you familiar with The Tragically Hip who are from my hometown of Kingston, Ontario? I couldn’t resist slipping that in here…

Yes absolutely, I am a great admirer of The Tragically Hip.  Road Apples is a great album, and I absolutely love Small Town Bringdown EP – which has, for me, some of their best songs – Small Town Bringdown, Last American Exit, I’m a Werewolf Baby…just sublime! The production is fantastic, very much of that late-80s era. Just sublime!  You must have been able to see them live during those times, which would have been great.

What has writing this book taught you about filmmaking and The Arts in general?

That I know almost nothing about filmmaking.  I am truly in awe of filmmakers. They’re part of my intense interest in the subject of cinema.  Yes, I detailed a lot of the production methods and behind the scenes activity of Tom’s films, but filmmaking is still a mystery to me, and I hope it always is a mystery.  I want whatever magic is conjured in creating the art to remain elusive.  I want to retain some of that awe that was instilled in me upon seeing Masters of the Universe in the movie theatre when I was four.

I do sometimes ask the question of myself, “Who am I to write about or teach film?”  I have never been on a film set.  I have never acted or directed.  All I can offer are my opinions and thoughts on the films, back it up with some words from those who were there and have actually made the films, and then try and edit it into some kind of legible or readable context.  That, really, is my job.  I’m just spreading the word about movies and artists I love.  I consider myself less a writer and more a proactive fan.

Of the Arts in general, writing this book has made me appreciate the dedication of every other writer who takes the time to write about a subject that fascinates them, no matter what discipline they work in, because their passion fuels the passion of others.  I hope my book fills the gap on the shelf that Tom DiCillo fans have been waiting to fill, and I hope it inspires others in the way that other film commentators have inspired me.

Who or what will your next book be about?

This has taken a lot of people by surprise, because it’s a completely different cinematic universe to that which I cover in The Cinema of Tom DiCillo, but my next book will be on Burt Reynolds.

Some people think that because you love art films and write about independent cinema that you wouldn’t have any time for the kind of stuff that Burt Reynolds is known for, but I always ask, “well, what do you know of Burt?” and the answer is inevitably Deliverance, Smokey and the Bandit, and The Cannonball Run.  They aren’t aware of or haven’t seen the eighty other films he has made, some of which are simply fantastic works of cinema. Reynolds has worked with some of the greatest directors, and to name just a few of the brilliant films he has starred in with these filmmakers: Hustle (by Robert Aldrich), Starting Over (by Alan J. Pakula), Breaking In (by Bill Forsyth), At Long Last Love (Peter Bogdanovich), Navajo Joe (by Sergio Corbucci), Semi-Tough (by Michael Ritchie), White Lightning (by Joseph Sargeant).

My writing process on this one is completely different to that of The Cinema of Tom DiCillo.  On that book I spent five years writing about eight films.  On the Burt Reynolds book, I have one year to write about eighty films and several entire TV shows, the major ones that Burt starred in, which means Riverboat, Gunsmoke, Hawk, Dan August, B.L. Stryker, and Evening Shade.  And I couldn’t be happier, but it means I am extremely busy. There’s a lot of people to interview, a lot of films to analyze and write about, and I still have my bill-paying day and night jobs (librarian and journalist) to keep me busy.  So when I’m not in work I’m still at work.

Will it be published by Columbia University Press?

No, this book isn’t the kind of thing that Columbia would go for.  Columbia is really focused on publishing works on contemporary, influential directors who are presently relevant throughout the entire spectrum of World Cinema, and whose work has immediate academic currency, all of which applies to Tom DiCillo.  Burt Reynolds, however, doesn’t necessarily fall into those categories because he hasn’t directed a film in nearly two decades, is mainly celebrated for his acting work rather than his directing, and some people might not see the “academic” value of my writing about Cop and a Half or Smokey and the Bandit II.

My Burt Reynolds book needed a publisher who understands and shares my perspective on Burt Reynolds; that he is one of the truly great American film stars and an enduring icon of US cinema. There is something absolutely compelling about him every moment he is on the screen, and he’s one of the few actors left who you can genuinely call a living legend.  As a book of film history and film criticism it will benefit from Reynolds’ prolific and expansive work which spans many important movements through American film history, going from the Golden Age studio system of the late 50s, through the New Hollywood of the 60s and 70s, to the blockbuster world of the 80s, and indie cinema of the 90s and up to today. For this book I’ve already been talking to some great directors, cinematographers, and actors – some truly fascinating people.

I signed with a distinguished publisher who have an amazing catalogue of film books to their name and who immediately understood what I wanted to do and shared my enthusiasm for the man.  They also saw the gap in the market for a book on Burt Reynolds’ actual films because while there have been books on him in the past, they were more concerned with his personal life.  I have no interest in his personal life, but I absolutely love his films.  He’s probably my favorite movie star, alongside John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Doris Day, Steve Buscemi, and Dennis Hopper.

I’ve definitely enjoyed some of Burt Reynolds’ work that I’ve seen but I’m sure that after I read your new book, I’ll want to revisit his work.  I’ll look forward to that!

Thanks Christine! Yeah, I hope it encourages people to check out his work which has gone under the radar or is simply forgotten.  It’s also a celebration of and tribute to this great figure of cinema and his vast body of work, as well as an opportunity to appreciate the art of the films.  Burt has recurrently worked with some of the finest cinematographers, such as William A. Fraker, Nick McLean Sr., Vilmos Zsigmond, to name just a few.  You don’t read much technical and aesthetic analysis of many of Burt’s films, and so that’s partly what I’m doing.

I think I could talk to you for days, Wayne, but I should probably end our conversation here. Thank you very much for taking the time to talk to me and for sharing your passions with my readers.

It was my pleasure, Christine.  I hope people enjoy the book and go out and watch Tom DiCillo films. That’s really what it’s all about.

The Cinema of Tom DiCillo: Include Me Out by Wayne Byrne

The Cinema of Tom DiCilloBook Review
Title: The Cinema of Tom DiCillo: Include Me Out
Author:  Wayne Byrne
Publisher: Wallflower Press
Released: September 2017
Pages: 208
ISBN-13: 978-0231185356
Book Reviewer: Christine Bode
Stars:  4.5

I admit that I can’t review The Cinema of Tom DiCillo: Include Me Out by Wayne Byrne without bias, but I can say that my bias is formed by a deep appreciation of Tom DiCillo’s films and Tom DiCillo, the man. I was fortunate to receive a review copy of the book from Columbia University Press’ Wallflower division and am pleased to give you my honest opinion about it.

I believe that the first of DiCillo’s films that I ever saw was Living in Oblivion, when I rented it on DVD soon after it was released – likely in 1996. As a life-long film fan, Living in Oblivion, a humourous, heartfelt film about the making of an independent film, was an absolute treasure to discover and has since become DiCillo’s seminal masterpiece. It wasn’t long after that when I also rented and enjoyed watching Johnny Suede, the now cult film with a cool surf music score that helped to launch Brad Pitt and Catherine Keener’s careers. Because I’ve always enjoyed Keener’s work and because she was in four of DiCillo’s films, I kept watching them and had seen at least four of them before I got to know a lot more about the filmmaker.

Then, in a strange, albeit serendipitous twist of fate, I became friends with Tom DiCillo when I discovered his blog as he was writing about the process of releasing and trying to find a distributor for When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors (which won a Grammy in 2011), over seven years ago. The Doors are on my Top 5 Favourite Bands of All Time list and as such they formed the basis for our original conversation. However, we have continued to stay in touch ever since, because Tom is a very accessible, generous man with a kind heart and genuine appreciation for his fans. Not only am I a fan of his body of work, but I admire and respect him as an artist and a human being.  I’m equally enamored with Tom’s music project, The Black and Blue Orkestre, because I love his singing voice and the combination of Spaghetti Western, Surf and Cinematic Gothic Rockabilly grooves that form the music.

But back to the book. This volume by Irish author and Film Studies lecturer / education consultant Wayne Byrne is an extremely well-written, intelligent, enthralling addition to the Directors’ Cuts series published by Wallflower Press and a must-read for any cineaste or film student. It took Byrne five years to complete, but during that time he interviewed not only Tom DiCillo, at length, but also many of the actors in his films, including Steve Buscemi who wrote the foreword.

“In short, this wonderful book details the ultimate triumphant journey of one of independent cinema’s smartest, funniest, and fiercest warriors.” ~ Steve Buscemi

Byrne’s book is an interesting in-depth look at all of DiCillo’s eight independent films (seven of which premiered at Sundance) the agony and the ecstasy of birthing them, as well as an honest, insider’s view into the independent film industry and the machinations of the Hollywood system.

In his book, Byrne analyzes the themes of identity, family, and masculinity in DiCillo’s work and supports it with “in-depth coverage of the generic and aesthetic aspects of DiCillo’s distinctive and influential film style.” Through detailed chapters on each of his feature films, readers receive “…a candid look behind-the-scenes of both the American independent film industry – from the No Wave movement of the 1980s, through the Indie boom of the 1990s, to the contemporary milieu – and the Hollywood studio system.”

Byrne studied the writing, production, and release of each of DiCillo’s films and followed them with an extensive and intriguing Q&A with him, as well as exclusive interviews with many actors and collaborators including Steve Buscemi, Catherine Keener, Peter Dinklage, Sam Rockwell, John Turturro, Chris Noth, Maxwell Caulfield, Matthew Modine, Gina Gershon, Kevin Corrigan, Alison Lohman and John Densmore and Robby Krieger of The Doors.

Johnny Suede (1991)
Living in Oblivion (1995)
Box of Moonlight (1996)
The Real Blonde (1997)
Double Whammy (2001)
Delirious (2006)
When You’re Strange (2009)
Down in Shadowland (2014)

I own all DiCillo’s films and have watched them all again with new eyes after reading Byrne’s book, getting something new from each of them even though I’ve seen six of them previously, at least a couple of times. Perhaps that is what allows DiCillo’s work to endure throughout the years. It is clever, often subversive and upon first viewing you may think, “Well, what was that all about? That was a bit bizarre…”, but upon further viewing, you really get a feel for the director’s unique style and voice, use of colour, choice of music (often created by composer Jim Farmer) as well as the themes that inspire him. It is DiCillo’s way of viewing and expressing humanity in his work with his distinct sense of humour and pathos that makes these films stand out in the crowd of slick, violent, comic-book infested, often soulless, unoriginal movies from Hollywood that we’re seeing today. Give me the work of Jim Jarmusch, Richard Linklater, The Coen Brothers, Michael Winterbottom, Tim Burton and Tom DiCillo any day. If you agree, read this book.

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All The Light We Cannot SeeBook Review

Title: All The Light We Cannot See
Author:  Anthony Doerr
Imprint: Scribner
Published: 2014
Pages: 544
ISBN: 978-1-5011-0456-5
Stars:  4.0

I am not usually drawn to novels set during World War II.  Maybe it’s because I am half German, and have no desire whatsoever to read anything about Hitler, particularly now that we are living in a political climate fuelled by a buffoon dictator just south of the border, in 2017. I do, however, love stories set in Paris, which is why I decided to give this book a try, although it was also enthusiastically recommended to me by my good friend Deborah Ledon who did not steer me wrong with her last recommendation.

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, the Pulitzer Prize-winning 2014 novel, is a work of art in more ways than one.  Each short chapter is like a photograph come to life, filled with colour, texture, and light, revealing one image, a small piece of the story. Doerr’s prose is so beautiful that we cannot put the book down for wanting to experience, with all of our senses, that next piece of the story. And all of our senses are heightened as we do.

The book begins on 7 August 1944 as Germany is bombing France, or more specifically, Saint-Malo, France, as a 16-year-old blind girl named Marie-Laure LeBlanc kneels over a table at Number 4 rue Vauborel, holding a model of the city in miniature. She knows every centimetre of the model by touch and has memorized its street names. She can hear the bombers, who are three miles away, approaching Saint-Malo.

“Five streets to the north, a white-haired 18-year-old German private named Werner Pfennig wakes to a faint staccato hum.” He is in the Hotel of Bees, a once cheerful address where Parisians would stay on weekend holidays. Werner is in the building when bombers brandishing high-velocity anti-air guns known as 88s start to destroy everything in the vicinity of the hotel. What, we wonder, could possibly happen next?

Compelled to turn the pages of each short chapter, we study them as if they are photographs on exhibition in an art gallery. As we move through each chapter in the first 90 pages of the book, a ten-year history of these two main characters is revealed in snapshot after snapshot.

We learn about the curse of an ancient blue diamond containing a touch of red at its center, known as the Sea of Flames. The 133 carat diamond has been locked up in a cleverly disguised vault in the basement of the Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris where Marie-Laure’s father works as the principal locksmith.

We also learn that Werner was raised with his sister Jutta, in a Children’s Home in Zollverein, a coal-mining complex near Essen, Germany by a kind woman named Frau Elena, and that young Werner, who has a love of science, also possesses a knack for repairing radios, which may just save him from having to work in the coal mines like all of the other 15-year-old boys in the region.

Sergeant Major Reinhold Von Rumpel, a gemologist before the war, now works for the Reich. It is his mission to find the Sea of Flames for the Führer for his proposed empyrean city in Linz, Austria, at the center of which he plans to build a kilometre-long museum filled with the greatest treasures in all of Europe and Russia.

The author flips us back and forth between what is happening to Marie-Laure and what is happening to Werner from 1934 to 1944, his exquisite writing moving with the pace of a suspense thriller. And then he starts to weave in the story of Von Rumpel and we slowly discover how all three characters’ lives will intersect.

Werner’s story is particularly heart-wrenching as he is recruited by the Reich – who force 14-year-old boys to train for their Machiavellian purposes – always weeding out the weakest, with unbelievable cruelty, while staying focused on building their superior Aryan race. Werner is small, sensitive and very smart and he dreams of becoming an engineer. He tries with all his strength to hold onto those dreams as the grim realization of his situation becomes evident and he slowly understands just how evil the force that he has had to follow and support really is.

By the time I read half of this novel, my guts were gripped by the horror of how vicious human beings can be and I cried as I was reminded that although we earthlings have endured two World Wars, so many of us don’t seem to have learned anything from them as the current political state of affairs in much of the world can attest to.

However, it is the indestructible optimism and resilience of the spiritually strong, like Marie-Laure,  who give us hope that things can change for the positive in the future. When one’s will to live is as strong as hers, there may be no limit to what we can endure. However, the price we pay for surviving the struggle is steep.

By the time I read half of this book, I was filled with sadness. This is not the type of book I should be reading as throughout this winter I have struggled with stress and depression. I read on because I had to know what happens to these characters in whom I had become deeply invested. There has to be some light at the end of this literary tunnel, some redemption, joy even. After all, the title is All The Light We Cannot See…but by page 400 there is still no light.

By the time I had almost finished the book, I could barely read the last 50 pages because of the ugly, depressing, soul-destroying events that occur page after page in relentless succession. Surely there can be no light in reliving this dismal history? I understand Doerr’s metaphors and by the end of the book I could see the light he refers to in the title, but that light just didn’t shine brightly enough to make me feel that reading this book was a gift and something that I shouldn’t have missed out on. The novel has its share of beauty and light, to be sure, but the cold, hard facts of what people endured in World War II at the hands of a fascist dictator are definitely not something I ever want to relive in a story, of any kind, ever again.

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

Mitch Albom the magic strings of frankie prestoBook Review

Title: The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto
Author:  Mitch Albom
Imprint: Harper Paperbacks
Released: October 25, 2016
Pages: 368
ISBN-10: 0062294431
ISBN-13: 9780062294432
Stars:  5.0

Once in a very blue moon a book comes along that is so unique and wonderful, no – downright magical – that it immediately becomes one of the best books you’ve ever read. Those books are what I call five-star desert island classics; books I want to have with me for the rest of my life because I know I will read them again and again.

Recently, my client and dear friend Deborah Ledon recommended a book for me that she said she loved and was certain that I would love too. I bought the book, called The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom, whose work I had read previously and especially adored in The Five People You Meet In Heaven (which I’ve so far read twice). Albom is a maestro of the rhythm of storytelling and I believe he has created his magnum opus with The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, a book narrated by Music itself.

Francisco de Asís Pascual Presto was born in Villareal, Spain in August 1936 in a church where his mother had sought refuge from El Terror Rojo – the Red Terror – revolutionaries and militiamen who were angry with the new government. Francisco’s mother Carmencita was aided by a young nun as she gave birth to her son, and we later learn that she died after childbirth and the nun took care of the newborn, who would not cry, in his early days as an infant. Before Carmencita dies, she sings a melody to her baby, a song called “Lágrima” (teardrops) by the renowned Spanish guitarist Francisco Tárrega, and the song is immediately ingrained in baby Frankie’s memory.

On the boy’s first birthday his guardian takes him into town to its largest store where Frankie hears a song by Spanish guitarist Andrés Segovia on a wind-up gramophone for the first time, and he finally cries. In fact, he continues to cry constantly and the only thing that will ease his torment is music.

Frankie is raised by a blind guitar teacher in Spain, known to him as El Maestro, who gives him six mysterious blue strings and a beautiful acoustic guitar, educates him in music, and allows Frankie’s magnificent talent to blossom.

Throughout this extraordinary story, we travel back through Frankie Presto’s illustrious history from the 1940s jazz scene to the Grand Ole Opry, to the birth of rock and roll and Woodstock, while Frankie (accompanied by his hairless dog with no name) searches for his childhood sweetheart, Aurora York. We meet some of the great artists who influenced him and were influenced by him along the way, including Django Reinhardt, Duke Ellington, Elvis Presley, Darlene Love, Tony Bennett and Paul Stanley to name a few, who help Music to narrate the tale.

I couldn’t believe it when in Part Five of the novel, Albom wrote about Paul Stanley‘s reminiscences of Frankie Presto, at the end of which he recalled:

“It’s funny. In 1999, I got a chance to play the lead in Phantom of the Opera in Toronto. I’ve never tried anything like that. But I went for it, partly because my son at the time was about five years old. And I remember thinking, “I want him to see me in this.”

Well, I saw Paul Stanley, guitarist and founding member of KISS, in 1999, in Phantom of the Opera in Toronto, and he was absolutely brilliant!

I was mesmerized by Albom’s story from the very first chapter and found myself smiling a lot, although sometimes tearing up too while reading Music’s epic tale about Frankie’s journey to discover what matters most in life and how the power of talent can change our lives. Music, fame, true love and the inevitable fall from grace shape the melody and harmonies of Frankie’s soundtrack and like all great soundtracks, leave us thinking about our own.

Like most of us, Frankie doesn’t get through life unscathed and has to deal with more than his fair share of tragedy, but music, love, and the magic of synchronicity save him, again and again.

This passage brought tears to my eyes with its simple truth:

He recalled a conversation with his teacher.

“Why do the strings make different sounds, Maestro?”
“It is simple. They work like life.”
“I don’t understand.”
“The first string is E. It is high pitched and quick like a child.
“The second string is B. It is pitched slightly lower, like the squeaky voice of a teenager.
“The third string, G, is deeper, with the power of the young man.
“The fourth string, D, is robust, a man at full strength.
“The fifth string, A, is solid and loud but unable to reach high tones, like a man who can no longer do what he did.”
“And the sixth string, Maestro?”
“The sixth is the low E, the thickest, slowest, and grumpiest. You hear how deep? Dum-dum-dum. Like it is ready to die.”
“Is that because it is closest to heaven?”
“No, Francisco. It is because life will always drag you to the bottom.”

I love the messages in this story that tell us with perseverance, practice, and determination, we can overcome the largest of obstacles in our lives…and the loyalty of a good dog can sometimes save us. But ultimately, true love and leaving a positive legacy for our children, is what matters most in life, and for this die-hard romantic, no truer words have ever been written.

With this book, Mitch Albom has become one of my favourite authors. I hope that you will read it so that he will become one of your favourites too.

 

ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT BROUGHT TO LIFE FOR MIDDLE GRADERS: Striking Terror by Denis Lipman

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT BROUGHT TO LIFE FOR MIDDLE GRADERS
Striking Terror by Denis Lipman to be released Oct. 2016

Striking Terror by Denis Lipman

Piscataqua Press has announced the upcoming release of Striking Terror, a thriller by Denis Lipman that will, for the first time, bring the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to life for middle grade readers in an accessible, entertaining way. “We’re very excited about Striking Terror,” says Piscataqua Press publisher Tom Holbrook. “We haven’t seen anything like this for middle graders and teens—a fun, real-life thriller using a real-world conflict as a backdrop.”

Author Denis Lipman says this is what drove him to write Striking Terror. “When I was a kid, I loved reading about spies, detectives and mercenaries. When I looked for a contemporary thriller to share with my daughter, I couldn’t find any. So I wrote one that hooks into one of today’s important issues—it just took longer than I’d expected, as I wanted to research everything thoroughly.” Creating a hero who uses his magic skills to get out of trouble was an added bonus, the former magician says with a smile. “Think Harry Houdini, not Harry Potter,” he hastens to add. “I’ve been thinking for years about a boy who will use tricks to get out of scrapes.”

Striking Terror is the fictional story of Micah, a Jewish teen sent by his parents to stay with relatives in Israel. While settling down to a new life in Jerusalem, the amateur magician befriends a troupe of performers—and a Palestinian girl, Shireen, who is training to blow up the bus he rides to school. When Shireen chooses to abort the attack, her handlers turn on her and the two teens must run for their lives. Using every trick he knows to stay alive, Micah helps Shireen escape the alleyways of old Jerusalem into the Negev Desert. Here in a remote farmhouse, Micah and his friends have only illusion, luck and courage to fight a well-armed and murderous enemy. Then, beyond the desert, Micah and Shireen are pulled into a plot that will rip the peace process apart.

Before emigrating to the U.S. from his native England, author Denis Lipman was a professional magician for several years. His first book, A Yank Back to England (GemmaMedia 2010), is a travel memoir now in its third printing. Before moving to New England, Lipman and his wife Frances
Erlebacher ran a small advertising company in the Washington, DC area for more than 20 years, where he was also active in theater.

Piscataqua Press is a small, independent publisher that focuses on New England authors.

# # #

PRESS CONTACT: Tom Holbrook
Piscataqua Press
info@piscataquapress.com
(603) 431-2100

AUTHOR INFO: Denis Lipman
dklipman@verizon.net
(603) 319-8852
denislipman.com

BLUE AND RED MAKE PURPLE: A Musical Journey with Grammy-winning Children’s Artist, Jennifer Gasoi

NEW RELEASE

BLUE AND RED MAKE PURPLE

A Musical Journey with Jennifer Gasoi
Illustrated by Steve Adams

Available on October 1, 2016 from The Secret Mountain

Blue and Red Make Purple

This new book with CD offers young listeners a musical journey through the different colors of Jennifer Gasoi’s multi-layered and playful music. The colorful picture book, featuring original illustrations by Steve Adams, highlight the history, instruments and unique characteristics of each musical genre along with listening suggestions accompanying each song. Along the way, Gasoi offers readers a chance to create their own sounds, and discover more about the songwriting process itself.  Full lyrics are also included in this delightful music-forward title.

The accompanying CD features 12 original songs that meld styles ranging from bluegrass to Dixieland swing, folk to calypso to Cajun and klezmer.

Featured is Gasoi’s GRAMMY Award winning hit “Throw a Penny in the Wishing Well,” and traveling tunes like “Little Blue Car” and “Goin’ on a Trip,” all of them with a positive message underscored in “Bright Side of Life.” Gasoi hopes that readers will be inspired to “express themselves, tap into their own mastery, and embrace their unique gifts.”

Jennifer Gasoi is a GRAMMY and Parents’ Choice Gold Award winner. She is one of Canada’s most acclaimed children’s performers and recording artists, offering upbeat, intelligent jazz and world beat influenced original music with all-ages appeal. In addition to her frequent sold-out performances throughout Canada, the Vancouver-born singer-songwriter has garnered fans at her concerts in the United States, Brazil, Israel, Singapore, India, the U.K. and Japan. Steve Adams has collaborated with many publications over the years, such as The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review and The Globe & Mail. He has also illustrated several books for children, including the award-winning picture book “The Boy Who Grew Flowers” (Barefoot Books). Both live in Montreal.

The Secret Mountain, celebrating 15 years of publishing music-forward children’s storybooks, has released popular titles focusing on classical music, including Amazing Water, Listen to the Birds, Simply Fantastic (all three by Ana Gerhard) and Sleep Softly. The extensive catalogue of award-winning storybook-music CD titles for children includes It’s Raining Cats and Dogs, Songs from the Baobob (African Lullabies), Dreams Are Made for Children (Classic Jazz Lullabies), A Duck in New York City by singer-songwriter Connie Kaldor and Tomorrow is a Chance To Start Over (Hilary Grist). The publishing house also has an impressive enhanced ebook list.

BLUE AND RED MAKE PURPLE by Jennifer Gasoi; illustrations by Steve Adams / Children’s Picture Book with Music CD (12 tracks, 34 minutes) / Hardcover, 44 pages, 8″ x 8 / Ages 5 to 8 / ISBN: 978-2-924217-79-5 / $22.95 CDN / Distributed by Independent Publishers Group represented in Canada by The Manda Group

Review Copies and Media Enquiries

Ruth JosephThe Secret Mountain logo
Tel: 514.804.4379
ruth@thesecretmountain.com
http://www.thesecretmountain.com

 

Waiting For John / An Ode To The Century Past / Imagine by Boris Glikman

The Dakota NYCWell, I finally made it to the city that never sleeps.  Of course the very first place I go to is The Dakota. I spent so many years reading about it, picturing it in my mind, dreaming about visiting it and now I am actually standing right outside its famous wrought-iron gates!

It is October the 9th, 2009. I have specifically timed my very first visit to New York City to coincide with his birthday. Surely he must come out and acknowledge his fans on a day like this, accept their greetings, perhaps even blow out the candles on the cakes some of his admirers will undoubtedly bring along.

Within five minutes of arriving at The Dakota—and what a thrill it is to see it for the very first time—Yoko walks right past me. Strangely, she carries no presents in her hands and looks rather melancholy on this joyous occasion. No, not just melancholy, more than that, she looks completely disconsolate and deflated, shrunken almost, as if some vital part of her has been amputated. But surely, once she walks into their apartment on the 9th floor, his famous wit will cheer her up and his cheeky smile will make her smile, too.

Meantime, I will stand here and wait for him to come out. I have flown across oceans to see him and see him I definitely will, despite those ugly rumours I overheard some time ago about something horrifying that apparently befell him a while back. What nonsense! Crazy things like that just don’t take place in our world. Surely fate would take extra-special care of such a man to ensure nothing bad happened to the creator of such sublime and immortal beauty. Why, I am certain he is half-lying, half-sitting on his bed right now, as I’ve seen him do in photos, picking notes on his guitar and creating more sonic jewels of ineffable wonder.

And so I will stand here and wait for him to come out, till nightfall if necessary, for I have to prove to myself that he is in fact a real person and not just an idealised construct created by mankind to satisfy its insatiable need for heroes. For it is almost impossible to believe so many timeless masterpieces could inexhaustibly flow out of one man. What if he is just an archetypal symbol of our hopes, our dreams, our aspirations for a utopian existence and so all my waiting is in vain? But no, that can’t be!

And so I will stand here and wait for him to come out, till nightfall if necessary, to wish him a happy birthday and to press into his hands some of my own poems and stories, so that he can see for himself that we both share the same ideals and beliefs.

And I will grab the opportunity to tell him how much his music has meant to me over the years, how his music gave me the inspiration and the courage to reach for peaks in my own creative endeavours, how music for me is the loftiest form of art and the most sublime means of expression. Alas, not being gifted with having celestial sounds divine arising and frolicking in my mind, I instead am constrained to convey my inner being through lame, unwieldy, coarse lumps of words.

I will let him know how I have tried to continue his mission of spreading hope and light around the world through my own writings, my own actions, my own conduct and interactions with people, for even one small candle can destroy the infinite darkness of the entire night.

Until then, I will wait, for I know if I wait long enough, he will come. He just has to come, for New York City is the place where everything is achievable, the place where impossible, ineffable dreams come true. And so if I just close my eyes and wish hard enough, surely he must appear!

“Waiting for John” comes from a series of pieces written by Boris Glikman titled “Impressions of America” after he visited the USA. This series takes a surreal and unusual look at America. Read more about Boris’ adventures here.

AN ODE TO THE CENTURY PAST

That was the age of despair, disrepair
of the damned and the condemned
but this is now, the New Utopia.

That was the time when we killed off our muses,
throwing their remains to the ravenous dogs;
our innocence disembowelled,
our hopes quartered
with five hollow-point bullets
on that cold December night. 

When six million replaced six-six-six
as the accursed number of all eternity and
six million nameless faces,
six million faceless names
were extinguished for that greatest crime of all –
Existence.

But this is now, the Neo-Utopia.

That was the age of despair, disrepair
when raven-black sun
threw rays of shadow upon the Earth
and giant bullfrogs ate pygmy antelope
bones, hooves and all.

But still we fought on, hoping for meaning to appear.
Yet when it arrived, it was only in our dreams,
dissipating the moment we awoke
and grabbed at its gossamer threads
with our crude, clumsy hands.

And this is now, the Last Utopia.

Imagine by Michael Cheval

“Imagine” by Michael Cheval


Imagine

When the city that never sleeps finally retires to bed, exhausted by its own exuberance and hyperactivity, then and only then does John appear at the memorial dedicated to him in Central Park.

Betrayed and forsaken by God, Fate and Mankind on that cold December night, John now performs for no one but himself, singing softly the sonic jewels of wonder he has composed posthumously, and still believing, despite everything that had happened, love is all you need.

He wears a hat made out of a mincer which is filled not with dead meat but with living strawberries, his favourite fruit, and his piano is a zebra-girl hybrid who died young, at the very same instant John passed into eternity.

If all this seems to be quite bizarre and beyond belief, one must remember this is New York City after all, a place where impossible and ineffable dreams do come true, if only one imagines them hard enough.

@Boris Glikman

Sneak Preview: Tomorrow is a Chance To Start Over Bedtime Story and Dream Songs by Hilary Grist

Tomorrow is a Chance to Start Over by Hilary GristEscape from the city on a musical dreamboat

AVAILABLE ON JUNE 2, 2015

Adding to their growing catalog of Parents’ Choice Award-winning storybooks with CDs for children, The Secret Mountain will release Tomorrow Is a Chance To Start Over on June 2.

Hilary Grist wrote the story, created the clay characters and performs her original songs, to offer a soothing, restful experience for the whole family to enjoy together. Her smooth rhythmic text and stunning artwork cast in a soft light between sleep and waking, make for a perfect summertime treat, wafting listeners into a reposeful musical world reminiscent of Norah Jones and Feist.                         

The story is about Ira and Isabelle, two siblings living in a little red house by the sea, who decide one night to escape the sound of the city’s beeping cars and sail off to a faraway land. On their journey, they learn from a newly-made friend, a robin with a soft voice, that dreams really can come true. In addition to the narrated story, the CD offers nine heartwarming dream songs followed by an ethereal rendition of Johanne Brahms‘ classic “Cradle Song.”

The best part is that on Saturday, June 6th at 2:00 pm, Vancouver’s Book Warehouse (4118 Main Street) will host the launch of this new release, just in time for summer! In the area? Then here’s the chance to bring the kids out for a musical afternoon of live storytelling and songs. Hilary will be performing some featured selections from this new release.

CD Track Listing
1. Tomorrow is a Chance to Start Over (Narration)
2. Tomorrow is a Chance to Start Over
3. Fall in my Loving Arms
4. Swallow Me Up
5. Float Away
6. Le petit oiseau
7. Say Goodnight
8. City of Green and Blue
9. I’ll Be There
10. Still
11. Cradle Song

Hilary Grist is a singer-songwriter from Vancouver, notable for her song placements that have been part of nine major television shows. Not only is she a talented musician, but also a gifted visual artist who (with her creative team including her producer and husband, Mike Southworth) created the 3D clay characters shown on the book’s cover. As well, Grist has built an international following from tours across Japan, South Korea and North America. She is a graduate of the Capilano University Jazz Studies program in North Hilary GristVancouver. Her influences are as diverse as Ella Fitzgerald, and Tom Waits, along with Debussy. Accordingly, her songwriting and performance style incorporates elements of jazz, folk, pop, and classical. Grist has performed in many Canadian festivals including the Vancouver International Jazz Festival and North by Northeast. Grist recently released her fifth studio album entitled Come and Go.

The Secret Mountain is a Montreal-based publisher of beautifully produced children’s books and music from around the world, in French and English. Several of their titles, including Songs from the Baobab, A Duck in New York City, and Listen to the Birds, have won international acclaim and Parents’ Choice Gold Awards.

PRESS CONTACT
Ruth Joseph
Tel: 514.804.4379
ruth@thesecretmountain.com 

www.thesecretmountain.com

Coming Soon From The Secret Mountain: Sleep Softly: Classical Lullabies by Brahms, Schubert, Satie, Debussy…

NEW! FROM THE SECRET MOUNTAIN – AVAILABLE ON MAY 1, 2015

Sleep Softly:  Classical Lullabies by Brahms, Schubert, Satie, DebussyThe latest picture book and classical music CD in the award-winning and internationally acclaimed series, created for babies, but for the whole family to enjoy!

Sleep Softly:  Classical Lullabies by Brahms, Schubert, Satie, Debussy…

Performed by Ensemble Agora; Illustrations by Élodie Nouhen

Soothing and entrancing melodies from beloved composers are collected in this newest addition to The Secret Mountain’s acclaimed book-and-CD series. The hardbound book features whimsical, dream-like illustrations by Élodie Nouhen and brief explanatory notes describing how the song was composed and how it was arranged for this recording. The accompanying CD, recorded in France with the acclaimed wind and harp quintet Ensemble Agora, features 16 soft and sweet masterpieces that will send everyone in the family—including the crying infant—off to dreamland.

The gently rocking rhythm of Offenbach’s “Barcarolle” launches listeners into the magical world of Venetian gondoliers, and other familiar pieces, including Schumann’s “Of Foreign Lands” and Satie’s “Gymnopédie,” convey a sense of timeless voyage through cadence and instrumentation.  Fauré’s famous melody, “Après un rêve” demonstrates the power of melody and harmony to create an otherworldly experience.  The most famous track of all was composed in 1868 by Johannes Brahms: “Wiegenlied,” better known in the English speaking world simply as the lullaby song. The final piece, “Brezairola,” is a traditional song which French musician Joseph Canteloube arranged in the 1920s; this recording strips the melody to its essence, adding the drone of a bassoon in the background. The result is a relaxing 34 minutes of sound and visuals for all ages to enjoy together.

In 2014, The Secret Mountain, publisher of beautifully produced children’s books and music from around the world, released the Parents’ Choice Gold Award winning storybook-music CD Simply Fantastic: An Introduction to Classical Music. The first title from that collection, Listen to the Birds, also won international awards and acclaim the previous year.

SLEEP SOFTLY – CLASSICAL LULLABIES BY BRAHMS, SCHUBERT, SATIE, DEBUSSY… / PERFORMED BY ENSEMBLE AGORA / ILLUSTRATIONS BY ÉLODIE NOUHEN / CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK WITH MUSIC CD (DURATION: 34 MINUTES) / HARDCOVER, 36 PAGES, 8” X 8″ / AGES : BIRTH – 3 / ISBN: 978-2-924217-24-5 /$ 22.95 CDN /  DISTRIBUTED BY INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS GROUP REPRESENTED IN CANADA BY THE MANDA GROUP

Sleep Softly:  Classical Lullabies by Brahms, Schubert, Satie, Debussy…