Savannah Storyist Shannon Scott is The Bard of Bonaventure

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Savannah Storyist Shannon Scott is
The Bard of Bonaventure

As a fan of all things Gothic and of the phenomenal bestselling book, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt (1994) and the movie of the same name (1997), I have long been fascinated with the singularly unique city of Savannah, Georgia. The city’s splendid Federal, Georgian, Regency, Italianate, Romanesque Revival and Second French Empire architectural styles, stunning ornate ironwork, 22 historic squares, and live oak trees dripping with Spanish Moss just scream Gothic romance. It is known as America’s Most Haunted City because it was literally built upon its dead and you don’t have to walk far along its streets to bump into someone who has had a ghostly encounter.

I finally got to visit Savannah for the first time in March of this year and returned for a very quick second visit in mid-October. I’m going back in January because the place has cast a spell on me and I truly feel that absorbing what it has to offer is part of my spiritual path.

The most important tourist destination for me was always going to be Bonaventure Cemetery because of its beauty and because I’ve been interested in history and the paranormal since I was a teenager.  Meeting Savannah Storyist, Shannon Scott, also known as The Bard of Bonaventure, was a delightful experience as he is one of the most interesting people I have ever met and if you read this interview in its entirety you will understand why. He’s a busy man so I didn’t have time to ask him many questions in person, but he has graciously agreed to be interviewed for my blog.

Christine Bode and Shannon Scott

Christine Bode meets Shannon Scott in Bonaventure Cemetery, March 3, 2018.

Shannon is a Renaissance man … a charming, multi-talented, intelligent gentleman, who has had a fascinating career as an artist, filmmaker, producer, paranormal expert, historian, author, storyteller, tour guide and CEO of Bonaventure Cemetery Journeys and Shannon Scott Tours.

Thank you for agreeing to take the time to answer my questions, Shannon, and for being a guest of my blog.

Note to readers: This is a very long, but fascinating read. It is not a typical blog post and is not to be rushed through. Take your time. Prepare your favorite beverage. Turn your phone off. Enjoy it in pieces. But do finish it as it will be worth it to anyone who has similar interests. 


SHANNON’S PARANORMAL OR “PSYCHICAL” WORLD EXPERIENCE

When and why did you become interested in the paranormal?

I honestly prefer the word “psychical” if just one, because it’s a better word and one that I can take more seriously.  It’s more of a true historical literary word and has a broader connotation respective of the spiritual journey, layers of connection between the emotional nature of human beings and the world around us.  Which is what I’m interested in as a personal course of learning.  The word paranormal is like its modern day, bucolic cousin.  Although, I’ll be the first to admit that like everyone else I have taken advantage of its marketability as it draws attention to these spiritual and metaphysical subjects.  I mean I did own at one time, Savannah’s most famous ghost tour company, Sixth Sense Savannah.  It’s a useful word.  But it comes with a price for someone like me and I have worked harder to distance myself from that word and in some sense, the paranormal culture, because it’s become fashionable and gimmicky and often very silly.  But as an old soul and deep thinker, I’ve always taken in connections around me so being in touch with my psychical aspects from a very early age led me to being open-minded, but with Reason well intact, and from there, following my sense of curiosity.  In high school, I worked in a Victorian cemetery called Maplewood and when you dig graves, weed eat around old headstones, make a study of inscribed sentiments and last gasps of family expression, it gets you thinking perhaps more than the average person about life and death.

How did you become a paranormal expert?

Again, there’s that word. Hah!  In fairness you could say I became a very reasonable recorder or historian of at least Savannah’s haunted history.  When I was still a newbie here some 30 years ago, I noted that in the same way in other towns, people talked about the weather, in Savannah, the subject of ghosts was giving the one of weather a run for its money!  And it wasn’t as if I went looking for it.  It’s like it was just there…at sidewalk cafe tables, coffeehouses, people’s dinner tables.  And it also had a gossip like quality. Like in the way someone wants to tell you about a cousin who met a celebrity once? Exactly.  Everyone wanted to talk about the ghost over at their friend’s home or their own ghost-lebrity encounter.  I think the first ghost story told to me was by a man in line at a Kroger grocery.  At the time, I’d just gotten off the Objectivist boat with philosopher Ayn Rand, which means like a lot of college kids sorting out the universe, I’d pretty much become a card-carrying atheist and was in no way going to hear about the ghosts. Needless to say, Savannah had other plans for what I thought I knew about the metaphysical world.  Ultimately, my sojourn into all of this is a mixture of just growing as an individual, having some other worldly experiences and then also some course onto an existential path called “a job.”  And then different jobs that all stacked up to me gaining knowledge and notoriety.

At one point in my storyteller life, I was asked by a tour company owner to develop ghost tours for the area as there was only one operating that was more family operated and he wanted something that would really stand out.  I refused flatly as I didn’t want to be associated with anything of the kind.  Ghost tours in my mind were hokey and just didn’t appeal to my beliefs. But then he named my price.  Hah!  I agreed on the condition that I could craft a tour in a journalistic form and base it on current hauntings or for anything that was historical in nature, that I would be able to source it versus just reciting it out of the book, Savannah Spectres.  Which I will acknowledge as a book, was the first and original source for every ghost tour company in town and was the first book to break ground on sharing this knowledge with the greater public.  I used it as a reference for tracking down the witch, Sybil Leek, the ghost hunter couple and demonologists, Ed and Lorraine Warren from The Amityville, and a host of other important people like Uri Geller.  Eventually I tracked them all down less Sybil Leek who was deceased, but her son Julian and I went through her collection of papers that she’d recorded regarding her work in Savannah.

At the same time, I was running all those characters down, I typed up a letter to the general public, printed 1000 copies and went around downtown and put them in people’s mailboxes in the hopes of landing interviews. I ended up sitting down with people or took their calls and emails, compiling what eventually became my first ghost tour.  To my knowledge I was the first person to ever go at such a thing at that level and in some respect, I became the second ghost tour guide ever in Savannah operating a nightly tour and the first to offer this more mature, envelope-pushing researched tour.  I spent the next 15 years doing it too.

As I built my notoriety as a storyteller and researcher, Hollywood started periodically reaching out to me and would ask me for stories for different shows they were doing and at first it was, “Do you have a story about a Civil War romance” or whatever it was, but eventually in the late 1990’s they start calling more and more about haunted subjects.  In 1999 I was hired by Triage Entertainment to help research and shoot the pilot episode of Scariest Places on Earth with Linda Blair.  We shot some of the pilot episode in Savannah and over the course of the next six years, I was active in working for shows like MTV’s FEAR, ABC Family’s Real Scary Stories and then my last gig was researcher and associate producer on the 2005 Halloween episode of Ghost Hunters.  In that time period, I got to travel and talk to about every parapsychologist, psychic, medium, and clairvoyant that was working presently or had achieved some acclaim in the past. Eventually, I got out of the TV side of things and concentrated on making my documentary, “America’s Most Haunted City – Part One” about Savannah, Georgia. So, you see, it’s a long arc of events and a combination of many experiences that made me as you say, a “paranormal expert.” Again, cringing here.

Please forgive me for making you cringe as it wasn’t my intention. Will you tell me about the creepiest supernatural experience you’ve ever had?

Gosh.  I’d have to say in my house on E. Jones Street… One night I was awakened by the cold nose of my Alaskan sled dog, Mina the Malamute, which was the universal high sign for “Daddy, I have to go pee now.”  Admittedly, I was on the fourth floor of an 1850’s row house and so if in fact I was feeling exhausted, I would just open the door to my deck and she’d click clack out there and pee on the deck and the gutter would catch it.  I know, right?  But as she got older? Bathroom time was me carrying her down four flights of stairs and generally back up and so as there was the risk that she’d not make it in time, the deck option was also practical.

So that night she goes out there and squats but instead of going straight out, she B-lined to the side of the deck, squatted and then came back past me rather quickly.  Now, I’m half asleep, my contacts are out, but I’m standing there thinking, “that’s odd.”  And that’s when I noticed “It.”  It was about 10 feet in front of me.  It had what I would call large hollow eyes, a gaping mouth and was wearing some sort of tattered cloak and it wasn’t just standing there, it was hovering.  Now I get into trouble when I invoke the whole Harry Potter wraith thing, but if you need a visual? That’s pretty much it.  Now what I can tell you is exactly this.  I was shooting it an energy of, “I’ve never seen anything like you before,” and it was sending me a vibe of, “I’m not used to anyone seeing me.”  It was like it was busted or something?  Anyway, as I stood there, I just remember looking right at it and saying as directly as possible, “YOU CAN’T COME IN HERE!”  I then shut the door and for the next 10 minutes walked around like a madman in my room shaking of the heebies.  I then put my contact lenses in and opened the door back up and it was gone.  I even remember looking down the rooftops of the directly adjoining row houses to see if I could see anything and I did not.  Over time, this being would present itself to others both while I lived there and even to the Cherokee Indian girl who moved in right after me.  This was in part why Ghost Hunters investigated my house in 2005 but it was done as an aside thing to the show and wasn’t meant for the show itself.

Do you have any psychic ability?

I have psychical abilities like every human being.  It is limited to empathic and some seer type things where I can see or visualize a person in their future even if I’ve only known them briefly.  But I do not associate this with anything out of the ordinary or being extra special.  It’s just what already makes me special as an individual in a completely natural way, and all of us for that matter.  You’ll never see me on a TV show or promoting anything around that by the way.  I would argue that most who say they have abilities are over stating things or are deceptive.  It’s difficult to contradict that stuff to say the least but my intuition tells me they’re dishonest.

Have you had a near-death experience? If so, will you share a bit of it.

Not in the NDE way, no.  I was nearly killed by a man trying to stab me in a mugging once and then one time was abducted by a mugger who periodically stroked my neck with a gun barrel but in each case, I got out of it alive.  Makes you think though!  I did have an out-of-body experience once in a time where I was in great spiritual and mortal conflict and thought I might die if something didn’t improve or that I might resort to taking my own life.  My 2nd Spirit as some tribes call it, traveled to the glass ceiling of space and a magnificent large cosmic presence told me, “It’s not your time and you have more work to do” and they hurtled me back into my body. That was NYE 1999 during that whole Y2K nonsense.  There’s a greater story there but think I will save it for my book.

SEDUCTIVE SAVANNAH AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD AND EVIL

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How did you end up in Savannah and how long have you lived there?

Savannah seduced me of course. But in reality, like so many kids, The Savannah College of Art & Design secured me through a scholarship for their Fine Arts program.  However, as I would come to tell people later, “SCAD was the excuse, Savannah was the mission.”  I have lived in Savannah for 27 years total and three off and on or as of 2018 is the case.  I was floored by the beauty of the place, even in its decay.  Just like Lady Astor once said, “Savannah is an angel with a dirty face.”  Now she’s almost too pretty again and a little snooty to be honest.  I had it good in the old days when just the old guard were uppity in a well-earned way.  Now it’s the boutiquers and the trust funders snobbing around. Thank God Bonaventure Cemetery is just full of dead people who don’t care what they look like or much how you do either.  Anyway, I digress.  I fell in love with this living Southern Belle cousin of Williamsburg or something and haven’t much wanted to leave. It’s like waking up in a bed & breakfast every day and the birds sing 24 hours a day. Really, they do.

Was the publishing of John Berendt’s bestselling book, “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil” a catalyst for any part of your career?

Positively and I could talk about it for hours.  And of course, Bonaventure Cemetery is Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil“the Garden” in the title idea and most of the characters are buried out there. One of my first friends was the fine art painter and furniture restorer, Barry Thomas, who is a character in the book described as running the antique shop for Jim Williams and who gave Jackie O the tour of The Mercer House in one chapter.  He was a brilliant painter but sadly died of AIDS in 1994.  I was a fan of his paintings and he introduced me to Jim in the bar of The Olde Pink House which ironically was a gay bar in the beloved mansion and Jim had once owned or was partner in the restaurant bar.  In fact, the mirror above the bar there is still the same.  Eventually Jim became my neighbor and I spent some time around The Mercer House, went to the last Christmas party he held there and before he died, a friend of his hired me to cook a Christmas dinner for he and 11 other gay men and Williams was in attendance, albeit somber.  I cooked them a nine course Christmas dinner.

Most of that circle didn’t discuss darker subjects around me out of respect for my age and of course for Jim.  I think he died just 2.5 months after the dinner.  In some ways I remember him and then in other ways don’t.  But I did get interviewed by Kevin Spacey because of the connection and I feel that Spacey did an excellent job capturing Williams, but the film didn’t flatter it.  I thought at times he was Jim Williams’ ghost (that’s how accurate) and a stage play would’ve been better suited for Spacey.

It was around 1988 that I also met Joe Odom who was heavily in decline, addicted to drugs and alcohol.  He lived across the street from me and then later I saw him all the time dressed in his tuxedo in the middle of the day.  He would invite my tours and I off the streets and play the baby grand piano in The Hamilton-Turner House, which was owned by Nancy Hillis, aka, “Mandy” (Alison Eastwood), in the book, and just as the novel describes, Joe would have his black maid serve us lemonade.  My tourists’ minds were blown away by that but to me this was every day Savannah.  Even when Joe was dying of AIDS, he looked good and he was very vain they say and that was the only upside to his decline, for himself, I understand.

I have distinct recollections of going to Lady Chablis’ house after Club One closed on the weekends.  I’d had gay friends in my youth but never at that level, I guess?  Savannah was the big city to me compared to my hometown in Illinois so people like Lady Chablis were part of this great personality menagerie in Strangevannah and I couldn’t get enough.  It seemed like everything before 9/11 in this country had an innocence to it that isn’t here anymore.  You could get a wristband at a bar at 18 and getting served underage wasn’t a problem.  We’d pile over to Lady Chablis’ house and hang out ‘til she kicked us out and I only had to stumble a few blocks home to Jones Street.

The “career” acceleration moment was when I started dating an older woman who was a native Savannahian but at one time a real power player in the NYC fashion scene and who’d retired back to her hometown.  The author of the novel, John Berendt, was part of her rat pack in NYC in the 1970’s and 1980’s.  I think it was in 1992 that he mailed her the manuscript and I’d catch her looking up and gushing, “OH MY GOD, OH MY GOD!”  And I’d laughingly say, “WHAT!?”  She’d reply, “I can’t tell you!”  Well, she went to Italy at one point and I was house sitting her house and she put the manuscript in the drawer and said, “Don’t read that!” Obviously, I did.  Hah!

It was eye-opening because I didn’t know all these things about the murder trial really.  I was so young then and kind of oblivious.  But I read some stuff that didn’t end up in the book either and of course have my own stories that should’ve been but everyone around here says that and that’s a part of what keeps the book alive too.  Probably my favorite relationship at some level was with the character, Luther Driggers.  For fans of the book they’ll know him as the guy who has the vial of poison and the thing about the flies tethered to his collar like they were his fly circus pets.  Luther wasn’t his real name, but he didn’t want it in the novel, so they changed it. Anyway, he and I were lunchmates and even after he went into the old folks’ home, Sister’s Court, he would write me letters and mail me things.  In hindsight I realize he was passing the torch to me on some of the secrets and I really loved him.  He died in 2002 and is now buried in Bonaventure.

What’s scary is that my own tours out there are just an excuse to go visit all my friends. By the way, Canadians are still the number one buyer of that novel!  Thanks, Canada for keeping me out of hock!  Oh, and if I may be so bold?  By the time this goes live, I will be offering my brand-new tour, “The GOOD & EVIL X” Tour.  You’re the first to hear of it.  It will be offered as a private daytime or evening tour hitting all the key stops relative to the novel from a Bonaventure perspective and it will be completely adults only.  The price itself will reflect the content and a reveal at the end which is worth the ticket price alone if you’re a die-hard fan!

What is your perception of the integrity of the book?

The book is 92% true, 8% fiction.  Or maybe 10%?  But even the fiction isn’t wildly speculative.  The title couldn’t have been more perfect.  Once you really, truly live here, you realize that the light is the most beautiful, but the shadows are the darkest too.  It’s a decent novel but some say, not a great novel.  However, where it’s great, it’s fantastic, and where it’s average, it’s average, in the way a Monet is average in places. It’s like the average stuff doesn’t matter as it’s just glue for the overall picture and it’s a very visual book in the way it’s written and then of course right down to the cover and the alienesque Bird Girl statue and her scales of good and evil.  The magic of the book is that any reader reading it in the early 1990’s might have difficulty fathoming that a place such as Savannah might exist at all and if it did, then they would more than want to visit, and wallah, the understanding of our Tourist Boom.

I think author John Berendt did a fine job and like any artist, wrote it from his own shade of interest levels.  Some have criticized them, but my reply would be, well what do you want from a gay writer about a super closeted society where one gay man kills another? It’s accurate from that level, and John Berendt, admittedly an outsider.  Although Jim Williams dying was perhaps the boon for Berendt because I’m not sure he’d have approved everything for publication had he lived.  Some say Jim’s sister signed off on it and gets royalties to this very day.  Just the story of how the book came together would make for an interesting book.  But for me?  It’s the cover photo by my friend and neighbor, the now deceased, Jack Leigh.  I mean that statue and that image made Midnight in The Garden of Good and Evil a Rosetta Stone of Savannah understanding. And like the power of art or a great image, it gave the book other worldly mojo. The image speaks to the title, and the title back to the image and then it all speaks to The Book. And note that the book hasn’t changed its cover in 25 years whereas tons of novels do.  The publisher KNOWS.  I mean incredible magic.  It would’ve been hard for John Berendt to mess it up but then none of that stuff could’ve clicked without his wordsmithing.  After that? Savannahians needed a good kick in the ass with a book that kind of put the town on trial.

Who is your favorite character in it?

It’s a funny question because some I loved more in the book than in real life and then some, I loved in real life more than in The Book.  On a purely sentimental level, I will go Luther Driggers. On an intellectual level, Jim Williams hands down.  Quite possibly one of the greatest mad geniuses that ever walked the face of the earth and the ultimate dichotomy of all emotions and human experiences and complexity.  If anything, the “Good and Evil” part of the title speaks to him as being both and possibly through a real time bi-polar condition, the struggle of rectifying it all inside of himself or reconciling? Not sure which word is more vital there.  I also think he’s a fascinating case study of an outsider that comes to Savannah, and a great individualist with a progressive attitude, but plugging all that ambition into a town where standing out from the crowd historically was the greatest blaspheme.  Especially if you did it freestanding from the controllers.  If I also sound like I’m speaking from personal experience you’re more than onto me.  So yes, of all the characters, I can most relate to him and even my walk here in Savannah and my movements here, have been influenced by his own trials.  It makes me think of Groucho and the whole, “I don’t want to be a member of a club that would have me as a member.”  Jim pretended to be a member but really despised them the whole time.  I mean he was his own club, but he got too close and then didn’t treat the members of the main club the best.  Maybe they had it coming, maybe they didn’t.  But once you turn your ambition into getting over on others just to have a feeling of power, you’re in a darker space spiritually.  I think that’s where his apple orchard started to rot in a way. Even so, my memories of him are fond on a personal level but I wonder what Jim might have been had he not had such a chaotic desire to get revenge.  He was literally a genius in the fullest sense of the term.

What can you tell us about root doctors and, in particular, the character of Lady Minerva, in Midnight?

Well for a decent amount of money I’ll take you to her grave and perform a ritual with you!  Hah!  I was just out there last weekend, with some mystic friends.  Never a dull minute. But in general?  Root doctors, root men, root women, are the lawyers and doctors for people who put faith in their powers of “heal’n and hurt’n.”

At a glance, they more or less come from the Gullah and Geechee culture of The South’s slave past and their traditions originated in Angola.  So, what they do in part, or represent, is post-African survivalism inside of The United States and quite possibly the most important facet of that or most closely tied to it as far as being on the back of black history in America.

The practice of root in my mind is about the roots they use to help heal people and on occasion, hurt people.  Although I like to think of root doctors in general as goodly people doing a lot of white magic and love spells and money spells and fertility ones more than black magic.  It’s my interpretation that the word “root” is both a nod to the actual roots and then The Bible.  Like it’s the root of their faith and they see Jesus in a way as the ultimate root doctor.  So, this makes it different from the Haitian aspects of vodou or Vodun which is all Underworld based gods and them possessing you.  And yes, there is white magic and healing in that world, but blood work is largely absent from root where it’s fairly standard in Vodun-vodou.

As I try to express to my clients, some 300 years ago or so when those traditions first came to these shores, they probably looked much more distinct…like chefs borrowing recipes.  Hundreds of years later, there’s crossover.  So sometimes you see rituals around here that look like a mix of root, Vodun-vodou, Santeria and Macumba of the Brazilians. I mean let’s face it, it’s a competitive world out there and every chef wants to be different, right?

In any case, when a family in The South determines a child has the gift of discernment, they raise that child in the woods to raise mystery and enhance the powers.  Which is why the old school root workers are very sheepish people, Lady Minerva included, who didn’t ever really feel comfortable with her fame.  Fame is a mixed bag especially if your clients see it as a literal detriment to your powers.  Anyway, they use a lot of cemeteries. They see them as in between places, and kinds of justice courtrooms where yes, the fate of spirits are decided one might say?

So, if you’re doing white magic, you look for the grave of a child 10 years or younger.  If you’re doing hurt’n, the grave of a known criminal, hence, why those rituals are the most expensive. Anyway, Lady Minerva or Minerva as she was commonly known to her people, was a complex character.  It would also take a book to do her justice so this is just scratching the surface.  I feel like it’s both hard for outsiders to have a true sense of her importance and then at the same time, a portion of her reputation relies on the myth. It’s like, was she all that or was it the character that made her more so?  She came from a known family of root doctors and in the family cemetery where she’s buried, many of the headstones say DOCTOR this or that.

Minerva also laid claim to the mantle of power of the great Doctor Buzzard who was the most famous root doctor of all time.  Meaning, she inherited his power at death which might make her a root doctor feminist, as traditionally the mantle goes from male to male.  Some say this is where she went too far even if she and Buzzard did have a romantic relationship when she was younger.  I guess that’s what keeps it all interesting, right?  Certainly, Jim Williams had confidence in her and their relationship is layered with intrigue.  He paid her hundreds of thousands through the years.  I’m also of the understanding that he paid her to help him perform black mass type rituals to bring darkness to his enemies which points to the blood work or Vodun-vodou elements again. I have no proof of that, less on good authority, that I trust.  I also have eye witness testimony to Minerva doing a ritual in the plot of a very powerful family in Bonaventure while Jim was still alive, and I’ll only say that the family name is in the novel itself. Near the end of Jim’s life, it’s said that Minerva and he had a falling out and he cheated Minerva of some back monies owed for devilish services rendered.  He was pretty, plum broke near the end of his life, but he cheated on Minerva by taking up with a Santeria priestess.  Personally, I think that cost him big time.  You don’t want to cross the wrong or right root doctor.  But that is another story for another time, kiddies.  I will just say this…Don’t ever agree to drink blue root tea.

For a fan of the book, this information is pure gold, so thank you very much for sharing it! Fascinating stuff! 

AMERICA’S MOST HAUNTED CITY

Shannon Scott

How did you get involved with the show “Scariest Places on Earth” and the filming of “America’s Most Haunted City” and what was your role in those productions?

I had a friend, Jill Sherrer, who was already a contact in LA, and she called on me from time to time about productions and we had a relationship.  She introduced me to former Power Ranger’s director, Bob Hughes, and we got involved with a motley crew to shoot the pilot episode in Savannah, Alton, Illinois and Athens, Ohio.  I was a story researcher and at first, an assistant producer and all around everything else.  I was 30 and they sent me a million dollars in equipment and were like, “make sure we get this back.”  That was it.  I rocked it for them honestly and then after Fox Family bought a season or three, I asked for a job once Bob Hughes became Co-executive Producer on the series.

So, for two years I did more of the same, albeit I need to re-up my IMDB presence as they’ve shafted me on some credits!  But really, I was in it for the fun and putting Savannah in the spotlight again and so I did even if the corporate suits at Fox made the first episode a little hokey to say the least.  I aided greatly in two episodes here, one, “Savannah Frankenstein,” and then “Haunted Fort Pulaski.”  The cameraman on the latter, Don Burgess, had been the chief cinematographer for Forrest Gump, as he lived in the area. Just a fun fact but it was a wide pool of talent.

After 5-6 years in Hollyweird, doing primarily ghost TV stuff and voiceover work – although the opportunities for me were beyond the pale – I, frankly, was still haunted by Savannah.  I’m a stubborn person and most stubborn for this town for some reason.  The fakery of ghost television was so absurd with a public who just didn’t seem to care or were just having too much fun pretending they didn’t seem to.  As for me, I come from that whole, “Leonard Nimoy’s In Search of…” era and was too much of a purist.  I wanted to do something serious on my own that Hollywood didn’t seem to wanna do at the time or anymore.

After I worked on the first Ghost Hunters episode ever shot out of their home state, I started laying down the track work for my own documentary.  Years earlier I’d started working on it with Savannah friend and feature member of the episode, “Savannah Frankenstein,” Mr. “Hollywood” Ron Higgins, just doing interviews of locals.  That became the spirit of the eventual film, “America’s Most Haunted City,” along with the obvious title being borrowed from the recent history of Savannah receiving that award from The American Institute of Parapsychology in 2002.

Essentially, I wanted to do something that was unfettered by interference of others that seemed more truly local and of my own voice.  It seemed like the film took six years to finish as it was being filmed and edited between other projects going on in four different countries, but I owe a lot to cameraman, Jeremiah Chapman and sound guy, Michael Gordon.  I hated the film for years because it was financially draining and friendship challenging, and it took me another four or five years to accept that I had anything to do with it at all!  I’m my own worst critic and the film is not without flaws, but I think I did everyone and every subject a good and that it’s good for my first film.  One of the cooler things that came out of it was the soundtrack of 12 tracks by Edwin “Blue Ice” Brown of Icebuilt Productions.  He’s a brilliant composer and made the music without me even asking.  He just handed me a soundtrack one day and told me it was just based on all our conversations we had in the Sentient Bean coffeehouse.  I was floored and so when people get the media pack, it has both the 90-minute film and the soundtrack included. I think I’ve moved 20,000 copies in its life so far, so you know, it’s out there.

The tale of the spirit of Rene Rondolia is a popular one in Savannah but in his book, Haunted Savannah: America’s Most Spectral City, author James Caskey says that there was no such person. Do you dispute that claim?

Well good thing you’re asking the in-resident authority on Rene Asch Rondolier.

When I first moved here in 1987, I learned quickly from older locals, that Colonial Park Cemetery in their childhood was called, “Rene’s Playground,” which eventually became the formulation for the S.P.O.E. episode, “Savannah Frankenstein” and Rene’s story is my favorite ghost story of all time.  When I actively gave ghost tours, it was my grand finale or sometimes fear-striking introduction.  As to your question?  It’s funny about some ghost book writers and ghost tour company owners, right?  They do all of that but also admit they have no belief in the subject less that others believe it?  Well OK then.  All the same, I 100% dispute the claim against Rene’s existence and not just specifically Caskey’s, but everyone’s, including those long before Caskey was born.  But permit me to explain why.

There are lots of the hardball facts, guys.  I respect that.  But if anything, Savannah has taught me, the former atheist I might add, who believed “there are absolutes,” is that oral tradition itself is also a genre of fact.  Things are inside of it that live both in fact and in lore.  I poke fun a lot at fact guys or academics with PhDs when it comes to Savannah’s past and what’s fact or not.  I mean look at how many records have been destroyed in fires, hurricanes and then what the Freemasons themselves are concealing and have also lost?  In my research experience, and bearing in mind those facts, I have seen that Savannah, while restoring its buildings, is also only now really learning about what it has been.  Facts are like a jeweler’s lens to peer more deeply but are limited by the magnification and then the seer.  And every seer is different.  There are some objective things available to all and then there are shades of shadow and light, color hues, that are also observable but are fuzzier and more subjective components to the beauty of the object.

It’s like the great historian at UGA, Phinizy Spalding said, “Georgia is the last unpioneered colony of the 13 colonies.”  He was famous for telling his students, “historians can go into Charleston or Georgetown and at best, just follow the research trails of others and expand on what they’ve already done.  In Georgia, a researcher every day of the week can pioneer their own paths and discover treasures at every turn and odds are you’ll be the first to have seen them.  What every tour guide loves about Savannah, or the good ones, is finding a treasure fact one day and sharing it with others the next.  So, without making this a full debate, what I am willing to say here, is this.  I have seen church records noting his birth and the discussion of his deformity and his mother as a grist mill worker.  I have read colonial newspapers from other colonies that discuss his presence in Savannah, using his nickname and a few records of rather famous people who observed him while they were in the city.  And although this is bit off topic, I will lastly tease that I have a humdinger of a sighting of his ghost that was detailed to me directly from the experiencer which clinches it for me.  Rene was real. He was unjustly killed.  His ghost walks and he is King.


BONAVENTURE CEMETERY’S HOLD ON SHANNON SCOTT

Shannon Scott in Bonaventure Cemetery

Shannon Scott by Andrew Montgomery for Lonely Planet


How did you end up working at Bonaventure Cemetery?

Obviously, cemeteries were an interest already and I knew ghost tours would have a shelf life for me, but I had a crazy notion that I wanted to tell ALL of Savannah’s stories in as many venues that I was able.  The sign from above was when in 2001 I noticed no one owned www.bonaventurecemetery.com so I grabbed it, naturally!  Even so, tours as Bonaventure’s first storyteller were sporadic early on.  I knew it would take time to grow. Even in 2010 when I split with a business partner, tour traffic out there was still turning a corner.  However, about five or six years ago it really started to pop.  Now 800,000 tourists a year visit and I’d gander to say it’ll soon be a million.  So yes, smart business move meets selfish love of cemeteries.

What’s the strangest or most unusual thing that has happened on one of your tours that you can share?

I think it varies from the psychic to just the obscene.

On the night I opened Sixth Sense Savannah Ghost Tours in 2002, I received some validation from Savannah’s spirit world.  I was the first to give ghost tours South of Liberty Street and I lived on E. Jones and Abercorn.  I’d been living in that house of 1852 for about two years and my roommate and I had seen the ghost of a female in the home from time to time who was very life like and seemed very busy doing her chores.  At that point I had not spoken the name that I’d received, “Eliza,” to a solitary soul.  Nor had I intended to make my actual residence a stop on my own tour.  But you might say the home invited itself.

We were a half block from my house by Clary’s Cafe and there were two couples behind me talking about their day in Savannah and I’m thinking on my next story stop so their conversation is sort of white noise.  But I pay more attention to this woman from Texas on my tour because she had a twang in her speech and she was saying something like this, “Yeah, we were down on River Street at this gallery and I found the perfect print and had it framed and it’s going to go over the couch; and you remember the one honey it was the – ELIZA WANTS US TO TALK ABOUT HER!”  Now I stop, mid-thought, with my back still turned to them.  I start turning and saying, “Wait, you didn’t just say…?”  And the woman has her hand over her mouth, her eyes bulging out and she says, “I don’t know what just made me want to say that, but Eliza wants us to talk about her?”  And I said, “Well what if I told you?” At that point I felt Eliza wanted us to come into the parlor and as I was seeking to take ghost tours to the next level…wallah, the first ever ghost tour in a haunted house in Savannah was born!

The old saying is that ghosts want to be acknowledged and I felt this was the invite moment for sure, so I took them into the parlor and told them what my roommate Gerome and I had seen, etc.  Nothing happened, but after the tour, the couple hung out in the kitchen for a while.  They’d been married 25 years and she was a nurse with empathic abilities, but she’d never told her husband even as much as they seemed like a very together couple.  That night she confessed, and he had such a face!  Kind of like, “Hey 25 to life, I love her, what’ya gonna do?”  However, I remember she said to him, “Honey, you know how I collect those old wooden kitchen stirring spoons?  Well, when I squeeze the handles?  Sometimes I can feel their energies and even see who they were!” She was a legit empath and noted that the same happened to her in her profession of touching patients.  She was sometimes treated to a whole cavalcade of sensory information.  She noted that in antique shops, objects of glass, metal, wood gave her the same although like some batteries, they were dead or faint or yes, full of charge!  So that night, my first ghost tour under my own moniker gave the tour something unique, brought a great couple closer together, gave a spirit satisfaction and then for me it was like Eliza saying, “You go with your ghost tour company, boy!” 

Painting of Shannon Scott by Cheryl Solis

Painting of Shannon Scott surrounded by spirits of Bonaventure by Cheryl Solis

Whose grave at Bonaventure holds the most special place in your heart and why?

That changes by the decade depending on who has died.  I’ve loved so many people and keep them alive on my tour as we stop by some of their graves.  But two of the most important – and I wish they were on my tour more often – Ron, “Hollywood Ron” Higgins buried in the Greenwich section, and then famed historian and former Smithsonian archivist, Paul Blatner.  Both died far too young. Ron at 45 of a massive heart attack and Paul at 58 I think from a heart attack that had elements of brown recluse spider bite complications mixed in with his diabetic condition. I loved both men dearly, like brothers, although Paul was more of a mentor as he was older when we met when I was 18.

I met Paul first in his famous antique collectible shop, Blatner’s Antiques.  It was the ultimate rummage store meets hoarder hovel meets tax shelter.  This guy was a character who had everything from the rifle surrendered to Sherman with Savannah’s capture to a baton of power given by Hitler to his successor, Dönitz, and many things beyond that.  He was the king of bottle diggers and bottle collectors.  He was a bard in his own right and for most of his shop’s life by Clary’s Cafe, well I lived over it at one point and then on the same corner for 14 years.  He also started The Savannah History Museum.  He taught me much, gave me much in terms of my own collection and we’d hang in the shop for hours talking history, Savannah, the world and of course, women. He lived vicariously through my stories as a man about town.  I miss him and his closing words at his shop at 5 PM, “IT’S CLOSIN’ TIME!”  Even now at The Smithsonian, some of the African American art objects on display from the Gullah Geechee culture, particularly the ritual and burial ones, are some of the most valuable in their collection. The burial ones might be considered priceless.

As to “Hollywood Ron” Higgins?  He was Savannah’s tourism mayor, and everyone loved Ron. The guy had two funerals really.  One Catholic and one Jewish.  He’d gone to UCLA film school, toured with Michael Jackson and seemed to just kick around with major celebs; personally worked on “Training Day.”  We were coffee house pals and part of our daily routine in the early 90’s, was just sitting there talking like old men about what was going on in the town and what we felt Savannah could be or we could do with it.  We were each other’s mentors.  Eventually, I helped him get started with his own cutting-edge company, Savannah Movie Tours which was a stunning accomplishment for all the movie scene visuals incorporated into the tour.  I was part of the tour with the Scariest Places on Earth show we were both in and on the tour, he’d stop the bus and make me get on to say hello to everyone like I was a celebrity sighting! Oh, man.  I literally pictured us as old men in rocking chairs one day like some sort of man couple looking back on our lives, still talking about the future.  And then he was gone at 45.  His headstone features a bench and an illustration done by Mark Streeter showing him sitting on the Forrest Gump bench and looking up at the stars.  That’s the one death I’ll never come to accept. All his friends talk about his infectious giggle and I hear it all the time.  My heart aches now just talking about it.

I know your ring is very special to you as you’ve included it in your last two posters for Bonaventure.  What does that ring symbolize?

It’s the ring of The Rosicrucian Order.  It features a chevron, an ankh, a cross with the 2018-08-24 22.04.22rose.  It was made in Egypt.  It’s my spiritual discipline in some sense and the oldest one in the world if you really track it correctly. They’ve had names like The Rosea Crucis, The White Brotherhood and others; their traditions steeped in the Essene and further back.  They recognize Jesus Christ as Master Jesus or the ultimate disciple and avatar for good.  In fact, they had much to do with his education on Mount Carmel and many other things that are not considered proper Bible teachings yet, but should be in my opinion.  At core, love is the religion and not much more complicated than that.  I found it through my sleuthish nose you could say.

As a kid, I was immensely taken with Ben Franklin, Nostradamus, and later, Sir Francis Bacon.  But I noted that lots and lots of famous creative, inventor types were part of this order but even their best biographers only footnoted it.  Now I understand that even those writers had missed out on how it connected to the achievements of those people and how it’s also easy to miss at the same time.  It almost has a secret history of being non-secret.  It’s just that the students or disciples don’t overly discuss it or make it a part of their general spoke identity in the way someone might say, “I’m a Christian” or “I go to that church or this one.”  Rosicrucianism promotes deeds as the mark of character and with as little ego involved as possible or maybe in the way people use institutions to somehow give them automatic or quasi credibility?  So, it’s fairly humble in most aspects.

Where I tend to depart with them is on their view of politics or the passive involvement due to their prophecy beliefs.  Just like most of us wouldn’t stand for someone beating up an old lady, I’m not prone to sit on my hands and see my country beat up.  I’m not sure if that makes me an outsider or not.  Probably, but that’s okay.  I mean Jesus was.  Are you familiar with the controversial Georgia Guidestones?  They were built by a Rosicrucian and let me just say, they’re not advocating a New World Order but the complete opposite. However, you can’t understand Georgia Guidestones without being well into the understanding of the order and it takes a while.  I’ll put it this way, I’ve seen and learned some of the wildest things and the most beautiful things because of it.

No, I am not familiar with either The Rosicrucian Order or the Georgia Guidestones. I have some extensive studying to do!

Have you been to Père Lachaise and if so, what is your most interesting memory of it?

Yes, and Montmartre and many others.  The most interesting thing is that I’m the guy who stole the penis off Oscar Wilde’s monument.  Feel free to print that.  I kid of course. But I think it’s fascinating that a number of people buried there, like Oscar Wilde and Isadora Duncan had Savannah and Bonaventure Cemetery moments.  From Isadora dancing on the stage at The Savannah Theater to Oscar Wilde sleeping in Bonaventure for two nights of his three-night stay in Savannah.  Which is why I chose to sleep in Père Lachaise for two nights.  It wasn’t easy but at this point, I’m a pro at the “after hours” cemetery thing. 

THE GULLAH GEECHEE

Gullah art by Diane Britton Dunham

Gullah art by Diane Britton Dunham, originally published at http://gullah.tv/what-is-gullah/

I know that you are drawn to the Gullah Geechee culture. Can you talk a bit about that and why it is special to you?

Yes, or as I call them, the most fascinating people you’ve never heard of.  Which is part of their appeal to me.

Being the keeper of something not everyone knows and as storyteller that kind of thing is tantamount.  We LOVE LOVE LOVE being the people to turn you onto a subject worth knowing about.  You know popping your story cherry kind of thing.  Also, despite what some people think about me these days, my heart always lays with the underdog story. The journey from birth to death, rags to riches and all the rest.  The journey of self and through it all.  And yes, that story often made even more monumental through the lens or reflection of America.  Plus, what could be better than a mysterious culture hidden behind the veils of Spanish Moss in The Deep South?  Thank you.  Not to mention my history books were devoid of greater slave narratives.  I had the whole “people in bonds” thing in my mind and nothing else.  It was made rather generic and possibly safe.

Savannah and The Low Country in general is a history eye-popper and turns a lot of what we know or cling to or think we know about events, upside down.  I mean you get here and learn about these willful people who arrived as slaves but very early on stole back their freedom, earned it, bought it and then as early as the 1780’s had real business and political power in Savannah.  Until I learned that stuff I was like, “they came from Africa, worked, died and then everyone got freed in 1865.”  I had no other information. So yes, here’s where you come to get it.  They have their own indigenous language recognized finally by The Federal Government in 1940, I believe, a kind of secret language that helped them as people from many tribes, speak and communicate around their controllers.  Some of those words are found in our language like the number one word of all rappers, “chillun.”  Also, culturally, I clearly grew up white albeit in the very mixed world of The Midwest where unless you live in a large city, black kids are just your friends, neighbors, playmates, fellow churchgoers and all your parents are friends. You don’t see race or only in an appreciation for differences that make everyone unique. Even so, as a kid I loved the electric energy, passion and soul of black people and admired their athletics obviously.  But it’s only until you come to a place like The Low Country that you can start to see more of their cultural origins and so you might even say that Savannah is halfway between my home state of Illinois and Africa in some sense. This is as close as I’m gonna get unless I cross the ocean.  I also think my Midwestern values made me less judgmental in a city of 61% black.  Like I’ll talk to anybody.  And some didn’t know how to take that while others found me refreshing.  It’s all about basic respect and showing a desire to share and that you also have something to share.  That’s what life’s about.  Civility and exchange.  Or should be.

My point is that my attitude opened a lot of doors and early on made acquaintances with everyone from Civil Rights activist, W.W. Law to root doctors like Angel Hakim and Mama Tilda. I knew in some cases that in order to understand ritual sites I found in cemeteries, I had to go to people who knew those things.  And they showed me stuff because my heart was in the right place and they knew I wanted to know some new truths.  I also loved moving to a city where “black” people, but are really Gullah or Geechee, would be walking down the street singing out loud like nobody was looking or yelling across the street to each other like they were in the same room.  White people don’t do that generally, although in The South maybe a bit more so.  It’s like we’re just one big family and hey, like the old saying goes, “if you’ve got a song in your heart, let it out!”  That might be the best statement about Gullah and Geechee peoples.  They’ve got lots of passion and lots of music and vibration to share!  And the Geechee in particular, love to share knowledge and anything that is life.  They can also cook food like a mofo. I’m fairly certain I’m part Gullah Geechee now.  Hah!

SECRET OR NOT SO SECRET SOCIETIES

Bonaventure Cemetery Love Truth & Stories

Bonaventure Cemetery Love Truth & Stories poster by Shannon Scott

Are you a Freemason?

Epic fail!  You can never ask one if they are, don’t you know that? Hah! I’ll put it to you this way. I’m a truth seeker who enjoys sharing knowledge with anyone open enough and I stay far far away from any Lord of The Mist.

Will you expound upon your beliefs about The Illuminati?

How much time do you have?  This might be better as Part Deux.

The Illuminati was both a literal historical organization in Europe and then a modern name-for-all that points to controllers in shadow operations influencing civilization through government, banking, education, religious and other cultural organizations. Today they represent 300 families more or less that rule the world and see themselves as high priests whose bloodline must survive at all turns.  There are 13 families at the top of the pyramid, one for every step you see on the back of the U.S. dollar as well.  They see everyone else as fodder for their efforts and that they are destined inheritors of the earth.  Crazy, right?  But it’s very scarily true.

In Europe today, they’re generally just called The Group and, in the USA, known as The Order. They have some private names for their gangs and then very public ones.  Which is partly what they’re required to do.  They observe that true ritual power is doing everything in plain sight. They cannot do evil to you generally if you don’t accept it or allow them to do it.  One of the three offices that The Illuminati ordered to be established, was by Satanist, Albert Pike, in Charleston, SC.  Another being Bohemian Grove in California.  A third location is still unknown to me, but I think I’ve set eyes on where it was or is located and it’s my intent to vet that more in the coming years. The mansion I’ve seen in Charleston has its own iron Gates of Hell entrance and doesn’t hide the fact.  Their history is complex and convoluted too…but to understand secret societies at one level…

Ideas outside of certain churches and governments and the cultural institutions of history did indeed imprison minds and hearts of men, because to express them, they, along with their families might be mocked, blackmailed, reputations ruined and even put to death.  This really is in some sense, what drove certain men to go “underground” and cooperate there, swearing secrecy to each other but that they would use their roles in society or offices to advance their ideas and to promote each other within the ranks and so on.  Which you could say is where we see the advent or reinvention of certain secret words, gestures and handshakes to identify each other, which is also not unlike The Freemasons.

All these kinds of groups from what I can tell, including The Rosicrucian, have ties to the mystery schools of Egypt.  It’s where all these groups are rooted in what they do.  But as “The Devil is in the details”, it’s how those organizations have traveled, translated and evolved throughout the centuries.  Some remain benevolent while others become, or some might argue, stay, extremely evil, like The Illuminati.  Maybe it was corrupt from the start or just became corrupt later but at some point, in its history, Satanists were well in charge.  History shows some of these organizations as having been co-opted by darker influences and then they rewired the groups to function on the outside as something good but these “priest classes” then use the lower level members to advance what are sinister agendas without their knowledge.  Which is part of the ritual power play, especially among The Illuminati.  We see that now in Hollywood and pop culture.

Also, it is very important to note that for The Illuminati, blood and bloodlines are everything and I want the readers to absorb this next sentence.  They will literally do ANYTHING, say anything, deceive anyone, murder anyone and put on any kind of face in any circle in order to preserve their bloodline.  There is no moral marker higher than that for them.  Anyone not of the families is seen as expendable.  Most normal people have no concept of what this means spiritually because it’s too deep and too dark and not something anyone wants to conceive of or think of. But they are here in the world all around us carrying out these evil acts and many of them are known to the American public and around the world in certain realms of power.  All one has to do is track their family heritage.

I get lots of weird looks, trust me, when I speak of household names because it seems too out there.  But the reason most people don’t recognize them as villains necessarily is because of most people’s unfamiliarity with “programming.”  Very key word.  It’s essentially about stripping someone down morally, so viciously, by abusing them psychologically, sexually, and physically and then programming them back up with the morality and response recognition that you want them to have or that the Illuminus require.  Then they will have a public face that is seemingly flawless, and they’re made to be a person everyone wants to know and is drawn to.  It’s all very Manchurian Candidate but mind control isn’t new, it’s centuries old.  There are some public figures in high places of power that are known, programmed individuals and as they are, I despise them, loathe and revile them.  Yet I also have empathy for them because I know very evil adults did very evil things to them to make them that way.  And sacrificing children, even their own, is part of the ritualism.

This is largely why 800,000 children in The United States vanish annually.  Some of them for their sex rituals and some for their bloodlust ones.  It’s a national and international crisis but sadly some of the 300 names of the Illuminati, belong to media moguls and of course, their protective political leaders.  I mean, let’s face it, try walking up to someone and saying, “Hey did you know that people on Capitol Hill take planes over to Europe and pay thousands to beat kids to death with ball pin hammers?”  Try using that one as an icebreaker some time.  Exactly, this stuff makes people’s brains hurt and their insides scream.  This is why you don’t want to be in my head.

As I told a woman on my tour recently, “If someone were to write The Bible today, this is the stuff that would be in that Bible and would be taught for the next 2000 years.”  I’m sad that it’s not. People routinely ask me what I want on my own headstone.  It would be something to the effect that I did everything in my power to wake people to the evils of The Illuminati and that the reader should do everything in their living power to recognize them and stop them.  It’s really a courage most people lack and sadly, with fluoridated brains, no longer possess deeper critical levels to even understand.

So, to that I say, “Forgive them Father for they know not what they are doing.”  I often use the expression, “Bridge the gap.”  Or like Morrison sang, “Break on through to the other side!”  If I could re-teach America’s children, or open The Shannon Scott School For Kids Who Can’t Read Good, I would strip down the historical narratives taught to children by the Illuminati institutions and I would teach every American or yes, every human, the real history of the world by illustrating where The Illuminati corrupted it or how events tie into their operations.  If we and all the children of the world were educated this way, I assure you the world would not be in the trouble it is currently in because we’d be a much more awake, loving, enlightened, civil and just society.  We would not allow these people to walk the earth.

Everything you see in the media now is a spiritual war from The Illuminati raging against those waking up and taking power away from them.  If more people were educated in these secret society respects, they’d realize that.  But instead it’s division by design and The Illuminati using our humanity against us by pitting us against each other. And as much as some want to think it, Trump isn’t connected.  As Newt Gingrich brilliantly said when Trump was running, “He hasn’t done their rituals.”  That flew over the heads of most, but it didn’t mine because I knew he meant it literally.  Trump also recently made fun of George Bush’s “1000 Points of Light” rhetoric from his time as President.  This was historically UGE!  Why?  Because it’s a Devil concept of their New World Order agenda and Trump made fun of it.  He acted like he wasn’t being that serious, but he was.  It was him using their media to say, “I’m going to take you down.” We’d all better buckle up too.  They’ll stop at nothing to keep control of the world.  My money is that they lose but at what cost to the rest of us?

Holy crap! This stuff will keep you up at night if you think about it too much! I’m almost sorry I asked but I appreciate you being so frank in your response. I am still processing all of this information.

AND NOW FOR SOMETHING LIGHTER…

I think it is time for some lighter questions and as this is a blog to promote recording artists and authors…

Who is your favorite author? Book?

I have a soft spot for the author buried in Bonaventure Cemetery, Harry Hervey, who wrote the original Midnight in The Garden of Good and Evil styled book, “The Damned Don’t Cry.”  He was brilliant, fun, odd, and had a powerful command of the English language.  But in general, my favorite favorite author is Victor Hugo and his book, “Ninety-Three.”  It’s Hugo at his finest and briefest, showing that the most seemingly unimportant person can be the hero.

Who is your favorite band? Singer?

Again, asking to pick my favorite kids.  So, I’m not going to.  I have a real love for “the sentimental genius,” Lloyd Cole and of course, Lloyd Cole and the Commotions.  His album Love Stories was like my life soundtrack in Savannah and his music takes me to that good, pure, decent, human place.  After that?  It’s Steve Kilby from The Church and throw in some Danzig for good measure and it’s a great car ride in the countryside.

What does a guy like you do for Halloween?

I live in Savannah, Georgia and just like Al Jourgensen says, “Every day is Halloween.”  I just act normal that day to be different.

And finally … What’s next for Shannon Scott Tours?

Shannon Scott

Photo of Shannon Scott by Jason Burgess

Well, some of it I want to be a surprise, but my goal in life is that one day you’ll go to my website at www.shannonscott.com and you’ll see that I’m touring in a new city in their cemetery.  I want to be the first person and maybe only person in history who can say he’s permanently on tour rocking it out in cemeteries for the public.  And I hope to have a following so that when you hear I’m in your town, the masses will show up for it.  After all, I am the ultimate grown up Goth kid and this is what we do.  But expect lots of books and art and gatherings to keep my version of Savannah one of the most interesting corners or versions of the island for people to experience!

Shannon, you have been more than generous with your time and I cannot thank you enough for sharing so much of yourself with me and my readers. You have given us so much food for thought in a world where the quest for spiritual enlightenment is at war with the all-powerful fear mongers who wish to keep us in the dark. You have my heartfelt best wishes for continued success with your career and personal goals. Love and light to you, always.

Father of 12 Inspires and Encourages Youth Through Epic Fantasy Now Shares Secrets Of His Success

Father of 12 Inspires and Encourages Youth Through Epic Fantasy Now Shares Secrets Of His Success

MADE FROM SCRATCH becomes a book with buzz.

 MADE FROM SCRATCH: The Ultimate Guide To Self-Publishing by Jaime D. Buckley

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 30, 2014 – Santaquin, UT — Jaime Buckley, Author of Chronicles of a Hero is known as a champion of the underdog. Believing each person has inherent value, he helps the world laugh at themselves, use each experience as an advantage, then encourages others to get up and try again. This same focus has turned him from youth and their parents towards bloggers and writers of all skill levels. Jaime’s alter ego Wendell P. Dipmier, the main character of his fantasy series, takes a back seat this time as the author expands his reach to the business minded.

MADE FROM SCRATCH: The Ultimate Guide To Self-Publishing became an obsession to help Indie Authors do the seemingly impossible—publish a professional product on a shoestring budget. No stranger to extreme hardships, Jaime shares his decade of experience and working against the odds, including homelessness, lack of funding and dealing with a cynical market to point out advantages many authors miss. His 21 books and prolific writing habits make him a unique role model for new authors seeking a non-traditional path. The book takes readers from idea to promotion and beyond.

“This idea started when I made some new friends at Be A Better Blogger,” remarked the author in a recent interview. “I met powerful, unique personalities—but few of them had ever published their work. With so much to offer others, I saw the opportunity to give that brilliant community a huge boost in the right direction. Sharing some personal experiences and pointing out a path most people could follow has become a specialty of mine. MADE FROM SCRATCH was written for bloggers, but it applies to writers in general.”

For digital review copies of MADE FROM SCRATCH or media interviews, contact the author through WantedHero.com or email him directly: jaimebuckley@wantedhero.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

JAIME BUCKLEY is a veteran Indie Author who started his career as a comicAuthor Jaime Buckley book creator. Husband, father of 12 and grandfather, he inspires youth and parents alike through his daily blog while designing games and reaching out to readers around the globe. Since 2005 he has donated both his comics and novels to underprivileged children and continues to engage in charitable events involving youth and youth-focused organizations. Photos of Jaime Buckley and the book’s cover available.

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Jaime Buckley
jaimebuckley@wantedhero.com
(608) 620-4376
http://wantedhero.com

 

2013 in Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 15,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 6 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

And I’ll Let That Big Old Whistle Blow My Blues Away by Jay Aymar

Jay AymarJay Aymar is a self-described ramblin’ Canadian songwriter who mixes elements of folk, roots & country music with thoughtful, often poetic lyrics. I’m thinking that he’s the natural successor to Stompin’ Tom Connors in fact. There aren’t many singers like Jay Aymar – an honest journeyman of music – and there aren’t many bloggers out there like Jay either. His blog Road Stories reveals this Gen-x troubadour’s musings on life, love and livin’ on the road. I like to think of Jay as my friend and I try to read his blogs whenever I can find the time because they’re like sitting round a campfire and listening to him wax philosophical with me over a few beers. I recently read this one and loved it so much that I told Jay and he said I was free to pass it on in any way I wished. Now, it’s true, he’s long-winded, but believe me, he always has a point, and the journey to that point is always fun.  ‘And I’ll let that big old whistle blow my blues away’ was originally published on Jay’s Road Stories blog on October 23, 2013.

A recent review from the bible of roots magazines in Canada – Penguin EggsJay Aymar Overtime on Jay Aymar’s latest CD, Overtime:

 Judging by the maturity, sophistication and clever bent to his lyrics and delivery, he has not been resting on his laurels, such as they maybe….there is no quibble about raising him to the higher rungs on the steep ladder of Canadian singer/songwriters, not just his contemporaries but of all time.” Doug Swanson, Summer 2013, Penguin Eggs Magazine

 

‘And I’ll let that big old whistle blow my blues away’

“I was conceived in the summer of love
a little bundle of joy sent down from above
and while a half a million hippies left Yasgur with some trash
I was rockin’ in the cradle to the sweet Johnny Cash”

This is from my song ‘Seriously Delirious’ which I put out in 2011 on the CD ‘Passing Through’.

It’s 100% autobiographical and was written as a result of meeting the legendary John Prine.

My girlfriend at the time bought some tickets to Massey Hall to see John perform and somehow managed to get us backstage to meet him. Was it George Bernard Shaw who suggested being wary of meeting ones idols for fear that it will only lead to future disappointment for the fan? I believe it was.

We lined up backstage to acquire autographs, one by one. He signed my copy of Fair and Square – ‘All the best  Jay’ … John Prine.  All the Best – being a song from his comeback album The Missing Years. Still one of my favourite CD’s of all time. I rank it next to Graceland for the surprise comeback and enjoyment factor. (well maybe that’s a stretch but it’s one hell of a piece of work). While we posed for photos with him and the band we were encouraged to stick around for some food and to simply hang out. Wow! What a nice gesture. I believe my level of knowledge about his catalogue and back story was enough to ingratiate ourselves into this party for an extended hang.

Then I was afforded some time to just sit and talk with John himself.  After our conversation (during which he had learned that he was a major influence on me as a writer) he shouted out to the band “Bring these two out for a few drinks tonight and tell them some lies about us!”

“I can’t go out drinking right now but these guys could be into it Jay.”

At which point, his guitar player Jason Wilbur said he was obligated to call his wife for a long chat and couldn’t go out, however, Dave – his double bass player said “Sure…sounds like fun!”

So we went out to a local martini bar and discussed the Nashville music scene with Dave for about three hours.

So much of what happens to us in life is by sheer coincidence or luck. Dave mentioned that the go-to bass player for a few shows in Nashville (where Prine lives) was unavailable and he ran into a guy on the street that same night who tipped him off and suggested he might be able to get him in as a filler. Long story short, he’s been touring with John ever since. That’s going back about ten years now. I believe Dave’s married with children and finally taking deep breaths knowing the financial ‘wolf is finally from the door’.

At the end of the evening, he’d likely heard my girlfriend going on about my songwriting and John’s influence to the point where he took some pity on us and offered us to come along for the next show in London. Wow! What a guy.

“Just show up at the theatre tomorrow and pick up your backstage passes at the window and come join us after the show!”

Done.

We arrived in London (ON) the following day and were escorted to the fifth row from the front of the stage. Remarkable seats. I took it all in and sat transfixed like a kid in a candy store drooling over the embarrassment of riches. From ‘Hello in There’ to ‘Lake Marie’ (Dylan’s favourite Prine song) to ‘Grandpa was a Carpenter’ and on and on.

We reconnected again after the show and another great visit. It was during this conversation where the discussion of autobiographical writing came up. Writing a song specifically about oneself. The idea being that if you write a few of those songs ‘specifically’ about yourself, then you won’t have to waste precious time explaining to folks after the show exactly who you are – what your purpose is – what you’re all about…essentially.

I went home and started the song Seriously Delirious.

Verse 2
“My old man engineered that train
Like a streak bolt of lightning right through the rain
He said keep your head steady son and don’t look back
and that’s how you keep the train on the track”

After my dad (John Delbert Aymar) returned home from serving the entirety of WW2, he wanted to explore the world away from his village near Saulnierville, NS.  Still in his early twenties, he decided to head into Toronto with his cousin. The point being, whenever anyone of us has leaned on him for advice or felt down about things, he’s always said “The past is the past. Look forward. You can’t change the past. If I were to have dwelled upon the events of that war then how could have I managed to move on?”

It always seemed like such a dial-in answer for many years, but as always, these types of sentiments as simple as they appear, hold powerful truths for a reason.  I often saw my dad as the engineer of his train. He was pulling eight box cars and mom holding down the Caboose and keeping it all together. (Perhaps it’s the female spirit that looks back and keeps our history into perspective – I’m not sure, but I do know my mom was amazing at grounding us in family tradition.) So, I wrote those words about my Dad as a train engineer and made the “rockin in the cradle to the sweet Johnny Cash” reference quite deliberately – as a bit of an inside joke within the family.

You see, my dad has this old Hawaiian guitar he picked up from a guy he visited in prison. As the story goes, he visited an old acquaintance in the Comeauville jail.  During the visit, the guy wanted five bucks for his cheap guitar (evidently for a carton of cigarettes). The transaction went down and this was ultimately become the first guitar I would see in my life. 

It had painted palm trees and various birds and a Hawaiian sunset on the front of it. It was a Spanish guitar with nylon strings. It seemed more of a prop or a toy then a real guitar. My earliest childhood memories are of my dad popping his collar, pretending to play that guitar while gyrating his hips like Elvis – screaming ‘YOU AIN’T NOTHING BUT A HOUND DOG’  in front of all of us. I was transfixed.

I remember the very, very first record player was a small stand alone player with just a few records in the rack below it.

Johnny Cash’s Greatest Hits sat amongst the few gems. I believe it was of his early Sun recordings and it was incredible.

For the longest time, it all just made sense to me. The cheap guitar from a guy in prison – was that Folsom Prison? The train songs the rockabilly beat. The joy it brought. It taught me so much.

That said, our family was not even remotely into country music.

My dad’s true passion was swing jazz and crooners. At 92 he can still sing Nat King Cole’s Mona Lisa and send the shiver up the spine of anyone who’d care to listen. The only reason that album ever made it into our house was through my brother Dave (likely) or Bob (also likely).

So as time marched on, I learned that it was all connected. Everything. Prine was influenced by Cash. Cash didn’t really do time in prison other than for a few public intoxication’s. Our family guitar was from a guy in prison. I eventually discovered the epic Live from Folsom and Live from San Quentin Cash albums. I eventually discovered the entire world of fiction based on these themes – from Voltaire’s Candide to Crime and Punishment …oh hell…it goes on and on. From learning about Mandela to watching movies like Cool Hand Luke.

It can seem like a romantic notion in some ways to think that Johnny Cash performed for the incarcerated. A selfless gesture indeed. Those live recordings capture the palpable energy of a man in his prime, singing to those without a lot of hope.  What could that be like? Wow…only Cash could have pulled that off.  Until it was asked of me. I said ‘ABSOLUTELY YES!’

Wait…what? Really? What just happened?

Early last week I received an email from Jill Zmud, a talented folk songwriter, community activist and all around cool girl from Ottawa, ON. She coordinates a program called Art Beat which connects folk musicians with local schools and hospitals (for starters). During a previous conference, for example, I volunteered to discuss ‘FOLK MUSIC’ and ‘SONGWRITING’ and ‘LIFE ON THE ROAD’ to about 60 grade 7-8 students at a southern Ontario elementary school. It was amazing! As always, these gestures always pay us back ten-fold. The discussion with the kids slowly turned into me talking about how folk music has always represented the underdog.

“You kids want change? How we gonna do that? Folk music?”

and the kids screamed out “YEAH!”

“OK… I propose we have big speakers playing music during lunch break in the cafeteria! Why don’t we have music playing during lunch?” Who wants music?”

Repeat after me “WE WANT MUSIC…WE WANT MUSIC!”

“LOUDER…STOMP YOUR FEET…I WANT YOU TO ALL STOMP YOUR FEET AND SCREAM SO LOUD THAT THE PRINCIPLE WILL COME UP HERE AND FINALLY LISTEN TO US!”

And they did. And the principle arrived at the door a few minutes later. Strapped with my guitar, I whispered to him in the hallway, ‘Just play along, I’m teaching them how to protest!”

And he was brilliant. He stormed into the classroom to become a perfect foil.

“What’s all this about?”

“We want music in the cafeteria during lunch hour!”

The kids laughed, the teacher laughed, I laughed and I had them sing my one and only children’s song ‘Apple Pickin’ and we all walked away richer for the experience. I’ve often thought if I were to retire from music, teaching would be such a noble profession.

Art Beat had worked it’s magic. Everyone benefited from the experience.

Now this time, Jill’s Art Beat email was a bit different. “Jay, we’ve been trying to have a correctional facility sign up for Art Beat for many years…and it finally happened! They’ve agreed to let a performer come in and sing! We thought of you immediately.”

“Why did you think of me Jill? Have you been looking through my past? lol…”

“No we were just discussing your record and …”

“My RECORD! How did I know it was illegal to smoke weed in Cuba?”

“No Jay, your latest record – OVERTIME

“Oh yeah…of course – Overtime!” (Thank you Tommy Chong)

I guess word had spread a bit about my Johnny Cash fixation. Playing tributes on occasion and singing Cash songs long – long before he was cool again. In fact I remember singing his songs during the late 80′s and early 90′s when people would grimace. Yes, there was a time for a while when he was dismissed and this always seemed strange to me.

Regardless, I agreed to perform in the Brampton Correctional Facility last Thursday as a part of Art Beat.

Without thinking about it too much, I simply romanticized the task at hand and embraced the concept.

Hey Aymar (I said to myself), you’ve been singing about this stuff for so long, now it’s time to embrace the fact that the river has led you here. This amazing journey has actually brought you to this place. Ok here we go.

I arrived at the front desk on Thursday at 1pm. Without giving this any thought whatsoever I mentioned my name and purpose and they led me to the recreation room. In came the men who sat in a circular format in front of me. Several guards were on hand to brief me in a room prior to the concert.

They introduced me as a Canadian songwriter who tours ‘all around the world’ and ‘has just finished a 120 show tour’ which was all true, but it seemed to really give the guys (perhaps) a sense that I WAS Johnny Cash as someone immediately screamed out “CASH!”

As I prepared for the first song, the warden leaned into my ear and whispered “You’ll be fine son…they’re an appreciative audience!”

As I was about to hit the first chord, I looked up and saw the crowd. Something happened when I looked into the faces of the guys staring at me. I was grief stricken. Can’t explain it. I began to tremble on the inside. This wasn’t a nervousness or fear, but in fact a deep, deep feeling of empathy. I didn’t know what to do. I hadn’t prepared for this. After thousands of shows in my life, I’d never felt this stuck. This feeling became overwhelming. This wasn’t a fucking joke – nothing about this was like Johnny Cash in Folsom….my dad buying a guitar from a guy in prison…Cool Hand Luke. Those fantasy images were just that. Fantasy! This was reality – I was in the middle of it – and I was suddenly grief stricken by the stark realness of it all.

Behind the men was a booth where two guards watched the proceedings from above everyone. It was all cool and controlled. I played my first original song then quickly got back to the CASH request. I said ‘Who was requesting Johnny Cash?” Someone from the back raised his hand. I said “Ok man, how about A Boy Named Sue!”

And off it went. During that Silverstein classic is a verse where the father ‘took out a knife and cut off a piece of my ear” …at which point everyone laughed out loud and FINALLY the tension was cut.

I was beyond relieved.

I looked up into the tower and saw two of the guards clapping and dancing a bit which eased my mind a bit more.

Then I asked if there were any guitar players in the crowd. Someone yelled out “Honky-Tonk!”

“Where’s Honky-Tonk?”

And he was right there off to the side. Humbly raising his hand.

“You feel like playing a song for everyone Honky-Tonk? Who wants to hear Honky-Tonk?” The place erupted and much like the elementary kids pretending to protest,  the guys began chanting “Honky-Tonk! Honky-Tonk!”

It was just then that I realized I may have been breaking protocol but they allowed Honky-Tonk to come and join me for the rest of the show. He was escorted to a room where his guitar awaited and arrived ready for showtime. He was a great player and was happy to sit back and simply accompany me with some picking on the songs.

Then, as though time evaporated, I looked up at the clock to realize the concert was over and my John Henry was required for a few pieces of paper.

Before I left, the staff and I had a brief conversation about ‘simple gestures of kindness’ in this type of environment. On how there may be an outside chance that ONE inmate may have seen light in all of this…a seed may have been planted in some soul…enough to hold on to…HOPE. I welled up.

I finally made it out to my car – shaking. I sat in the parking lot for twenty minutes, closed my eyes and said some prayers to the great universe asking for my own redemption. “Save those souls and give them hope. Thank you for bringing me into this world with all of the advantages of love. Thanks for allowing me to have the opportunity, strength and gift to do this.”

Then I thought about my own dad. Not the guy from “A Boy Named Sue” but the guy who stood up in front of me with his Hawaiian guitar, shaking his hips, screaming “HOUND DOG!” That guy. The same guy who said “Never look back – you can’t change the past”, the guy who provided for his eight children day in a day out without ever complaining. The loyal husband and father who kept us all on the straight and narrow. The same guy who bought the record player for his family (when we didn’t have a lot of extra money) so he could play his trad jazz and we could play our rock and roll.

I left the parking lot and drove to the four day conference where like-minded folkies had converged on a hotel in Mississauga.  Remember: GIVING BACK – PAYING IT FORWARD -this is all run of the mill kind of stuff for people in this community. It’s all part of the tradition. It’s part of the spirit. I felt safe here amongst this tribe. There were times over the weekend though that I couldn’t ‘shake’ the feeling of what had transformed me during that prison concert. In fact, there were times when I couldn’t stop smiling about it – and times when I couldn’t hide my grief. Never have I carried around so many mixed emotions from one incident.

Upon my arrival home the first person to call me up was my dad.

“Good morning son, I just wanted to know how the concert in the prison worked out?” I gave him detailed account of the events and asked “Dad, I’m not sure why I have these mixed emotions about it all? It’s like I don’t understand how I feel about what happened? Strange isn’t it?”

“It’s not strange at all. I really did expect this. Sometimes we don’t have answers for how we feel.  Just move on. It’s over!”

Just like the song:
‘Keep your head steady and don’t look back
That’s how you keep the train on the track’

In a few short months, I’ll be back at home sharing Christmas with the family. We’ll enjoy music and laughter once again.

As always I’ll be performing a local show, only this year I’ll have a new song to be added to my repertoire: John Prine’s Christmas in Prison. Dedicated to my Dad, Prine and his band, Cash, the Brampton Correctional Facility, Art Beat, Folk Music Ontario and the great healing power of music.

Next stop…

FURTHER DOWN THE LINE.

Scully Love Promo Nominated for a Super Sweet Blogging Award

Super Sweet Blogging AwardOne week ago today, I had the pleasure of being nominated by Easter Ellen of Overcoming To Becoming for something called a Super Sweet Blogging Award.  Now, it’s been quite a long time since I’ve been nominated for any kind of blogging award, so I’ll take it, with gratitude! Thank you for the nomination, dear Easter!

Easter is a Christian writer, poet and a beautiful soul who inspires her readers through her life stories and poetry. I’ve had the pleasure of knowing her online for many years and have read her blog quite often. She is an honest, intelligent, kind mother of four who hasn’t had an easy life but she has never succumbed to anger, self-pity or bitterness.  Instead, she has fought her battles, soldiered on and continues to turn to God for His support and guidance as she continues along her life’s journey.  Easter is a Christian whose light shines from within by the example she sets in her own life.  While I’m not a Christian, I enjoy her writing very much.

I confess that I don’t read as many blog posts as I’d like to because of time constraints, but the blogs that I’m nominating are all blogs that I have read and enjoyed quite often and their authors totally deserve to be recognized for their consistently interesting, thoughtful, entertaining and inspirational content.  I don’t expect any of them to carry on and participate in this Super Sweet Blogging Award post-a-thon, but if they want to, that’s great!

Your time online is precious, I know, but if you’re looking for some wonderful bloggers to follow, please take note of my suggestions.

Here are the steps you need to take now:

1. Thank the Super Sweet Blogger that nominated you.

2. Answer five super sweet questions. 

The 5 sweet questions:

Cookies or cake? — Very tough decision, but I’ll have to go with cake. There are so many kinds of cake that I adore including chocolate layer cake, carrot cake with caramel icing, peach torte with whipped cream, red velvet cupcakes, lemon cake, almost any kind of cheesecake, you see where I’m going with this!

Chocolate or vanilla? — Chocolate all the way, baby!

Favourite sweet treat? — Brownies, with icing of course!

When do you crave sweet things the most? — At that time of the month, ladies.

Sweet nick name? — Christine Jellybean

3. Include the Super Sweet Blogging award image in your blog post.

4. Nominate a dozen other bloggers. The following list is in no particular order. You all have fantastic, interesting blogs. 

Here are my choices to nominate for this thoughtful award: (and all of you deserve it fully!)

Easter Ellen from Overcoming to Becoming

Robyn Gibson from Up With Marriage (Note: I’m not married nor ever have been, but this is still a very thoughtful and provocative read for anyone who is in any kind of partnership, romantic relationship or simply wants to be the best person they can be for a relationship in the future.)

Dr. Samita Nandy from Fame Critic

Deborah Kimmett from One Funny Lady

Cheryl Hiebert from Sacred Journeys Healing Arts Centre Ezine

Dawn James from Raise Your Vibration

Jim Barber of Jim Barber Writing Services

Jeff Brown from Soulshaping’s The Soul Blog

Jay Aymar from Road Stories

The Swede from A Swede Talks Movies

Dan Stone from First A Dream

Steph VanderMeulen from Bella’s Bookshelves

A big, heartfelt thank you to all of you for writing really interesting blogs!!

All my best,
Christine

Scully Love Promo Blog – 2012 In Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 31,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 7 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

How To Link An Image Within Your Wordpress Blog Post

I was recently asked by a client how to link an image she’d chosen for a blog post back to its original source.  This is a very good question and one that I should be thinking about myself when using images for my own blog posts in the future!

I write a lot of reviews and share them on my blog so I generally haven’t worried about crediting the source for the book cover, CD cover or DVD cover I choose to represent my blog post because I’m essentially promoting the author or creator of the work itself.

However, it is very important to be sure that you have permission to use a photo that isn’t yours that you find online through a Google search.  You should always give a photographer credit for his or her photo at the very least, but if you can find out how to contact them to get permission to use it, then do it.  You can also use Creative Commons or Google Advanced Image Search to find photos that allow you usage rights and this is a very smart practice.

Here are the steps you should follow to link an image back to its original source within your WordPress blog post:

  1. Go to Google.com and type in the name of the book or keywords describing the type of image you’re looking for.  (You can also go to Advanced Google Image Search at http://www.google.com/advanced_image_search and type in your keywords and then scroll to the bottom where it says usage rights and click on the dropdown menu to select free to use or share, even commercially and then click on the Advanced Search button.  This will give you images that the public is free to use.)
  2. Then click on Images on the left side of the Google page.
  3. Choose an image that is large or of high resolution if possible as it will be clearer and easier to read when someone clicks on it.
  4. Click on the image.
  5. Right click on the image again and save the image as a .jpg file to your computer.
  6. In the top right corner you’ll see Website for this image.  Click on that link and it will take you to the website where the image originated from.
  7. Copy the link.
  8. Go to your blog post under Edit Page.
  9. Choose where you want to add your image within your post and put your cursor there.
  10. Click on the Add Media Icon beside Upload/Insert just above the dialogue box (in WordPress).
  11. Upload the photo to the Add Media box, choosing what alignment you want and what size file you want.
  12. Paste the link from the website into the Link URL box.
  13. Click Insert into Post.
  14. Click on Update Post under the Publish section of your blog.

Photos and/or graphic images are a very important part of our blog posts, especially now that Pinterest is so popular, and we can post our blog images to it in order to drive more traffic back to our blog or website.  So let’s make sure that we get permission to use those images that we find on the Internet and everyone will be happy!