Please Help Support This GoFundMe Campaign for my Friend, Fred Chapman

Fred ChapmanI donated to this Go Fund Me campaign because Fred Chapman has been a good friend of mine for many years and a great supporter of both me and my musician clients. He’s a wonderful, smart guy (he has his PhD in Math!) who really just wants to work and get his life back and I know very well as a self-employed person, that when the chips are down, we need help like this! Someday it could be me.

If anyone I know or that this post reaches can help with tips for a job for Fred (his LinkedIn profile is in the campaign description), a donation (any amount is appreciated) or simply by sharing this post, we would both be very grateful! Thank you so much!

All my best, Christine 🙏

DONATE HERE: https://www.gofundme.com/downsized-looking-for-work-cannot-pay-rent

In Conversation with Bob Geldof’s Drummer of 25 Years and Author of Timing Is Everything (a Memoir), Niall Power

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There aren’t many people who know me who don’t know how much I love Bob Geldof and The Boomtown Rats. Even though I’m not always up to date with the latest camp Geldof news, it’s a love that has lasted for 40 years. So, when Bob’s drummer of 25 years (for his solo career), Niall Power, wrote to me through Facebook to advise me of his story since their last Canadian tour, I was at first delighted and then saddened by the news of his retirement from drumming due to Parkinson’s disease. However, it didn’t take long to realize that this is a man who doesn’t let life get him down, which is evident upon reading Timing Is Everything, Niall’s inspiring memoir, published in 2017.

Niall, after reading your book, I was left with the impression that you consider yourself an ordinary man, perhaps quiet and shy, certainly easy-going, who just happened to have a passion for drumming. However, although you never had a plan for your music career, you ended up having quite an extraordinary experience as a session musician, playing for many bands, including Stepaside, Les Enfants, Ordinary Man, Eamonn Gibney, Westlife and most notably, Bob Geldof, with whom you performed for 25 years.

How does a musician get as far as you have in his career without a plan?

I can sum that up in one word, ‘Luck’.

I never set out to be a session drummer and end up playing with so many bands.
As a teenager in the early 1970s, my ambition was to form my own band with my friends, write our own songs and hopefully be the rock gods of the future, like our idols, Led Zeppelin or Deep Purple.

Niall Power 1960

Niall Power in 1960.

My dad was a soldier in the Curragh Camp, Co Kildare, and there were two army marching bands who paraded past our home on most days. I loved their drummers from an early age. There weren’t many teenagers playing musical instruments in the area, so it was always going to be difficult to finalize a lineup for the band.

I was playing the unfashionable accordion and wearing a kilt in the school band during

Niall Power in 1970 on left with accordion.

1970, on left, with accordion.

the ‘Summer of Love’ in 1967. But as soon as I heard The Beatles on the radio, I realized then that I had to learn how to play another instrument to be in a rock band.  I chose the drums after seeing Mickey Dolenz, drummer with The Monkees on television, larking around and generally having fun.

After a few years of practice, much to the annoyance of the neighbors, I finally mastered the art of drumming and set out to join any band that would have me. I had no plan of action for how I was going to achieve this. My armory consisted of my dodgy first drum kit, long hair, a smile and buckets of enthusiasm for the task ahead.

For someone who clearly states in the preface of your book that you are not a writer, I congratulate you on the great achievement of having compiled your memoir, Timing Is Everything, which was written on an iPad with the index finger of your right hand! That, in itself, is a testament to your passion and determination to see a project through to its completion, and your resilience in the face of adversity. You are truly an inspiration, not just because of your drumming prowess, but because of the strength of your character.

I couldn’t help but notice your incredibly positive attitude about life in general and wondered to what would you attribute it?

My attitude to life has never changed from the outset.

I had a very safe and happy childhood and I seem to have kept that feeling with me throughout my musical career. My parents always encouraged me to follow my heart, even though they probably didn’t understand how you could possibly make a living from hitting things, whilst hoping I would come to my senses and get a proper job.  I don’t worry about stuff, including Parkinson’s. Above all, I love playing and creating music, just seeing people in the audience responding in kind to the noise that we make is good enough for me. Not many people get to live out their dreams every day…it’s been some trip.

“And what a drummer. Without question one of the best. I know from whence I speak. In the course of my 40 years playing rock ‘n’ roll, Niall Power is up there/alongside/on par with/equal to literally the Big Hitters. He’s a fucking amazing player.”

 

“Man he can sing.”

 

“He glued the band together. Everyone loved him. He was the spirit of the thing. The joy of it. The love of gigging. The fierce ecstasy of playing music…What a man to travel the world with for over 25 years. What a friend to share so much of your life with. The things we’ve done and seen and been together. He’ll remember. I won’t.” 

~ Bob Geldof, Introduction to Timing Is Everything

In the introduction of your book, written by Bob Geldof, he says that the tedium of touring never seemed to affect you. How was that possible? 

Sure, life on the road can be tedious at times. You’re living in a bubble with other musicians and roadies with deadlines to meet every day. Things can get a bit out of hand, tempers flare, we’d do a bad gig, one person thought the gig was great, the other five thought it was crap. Musicians live for the road and as much as I like travelling on the tour bus (your home away from home), it’s only okay for a few weeks. I loved waking up in a different country each day and going for a walk down the Champs Elysees in Paris after being in Amsterdam the previous night. But you also need to stop touring, stop moving at the speed of sound and be at home with your own family. I have always kept a low profile on the road and steered clear of any aggravation that may have been brewing from time to time. As our tour manager ‘The Mick’ (RIP) used to say, “we’re only up for the day.” 

You played with Bob for the Live 8 concert on 2 July 2005 which was undoubtedly one of, if not the biggest, career high of your life. I know that the experience must have been surreal, but what singular treasured memory do you take away from that event? 

I have many memories from that great day in July at Live 8.

The one that sticks in my mind the most is the fact that I had to play someone else’s drum kit without seeing it first. As I play left-handed, the kit was set up right-handed for the previous band’s drummer. So, I walked on stage in front of thousands of people in Hyde Park, live to the world on television, with no time to swap things around.

The song was ‘I Don’t Like Mondays’ and was probably the only song that I could play with the kit being the wrong way around. There was also no vocal microphone, so I did the backing vocals, “tell me why”, into fresh air. You can view this video on YouTube.

It was amazing hanging out backstage with all the other acts including Beatle, Paul McCartney, who signed a copy of my Beatles White Album CD cover, which I just happened to have in my pocket. Timing is Everything! 

 

Do you know if Bob has any plans to record a new album? If so, will you be singing background vocals on it? 

As far as I know, The Boomtown Rats are due to release a new album in 2019.

There are no new recording plans for another Bob solo album this year. I would hope to make a cameo appearance on backing vocals, when and if the opportunity arises.

I cannot help but ask, is there anything you can tell Bob’s super fans about him that they wouldn’t already know? 

Niall Power and Bob Geldof

2011 London. Photo by Eddy Valdameri.

I don’t usually comment on Bob, but I will say it has been a great pleasure to have had the opportunity to keep the beat behind him for all those years. I never expected it to last more than one tour. A truly amazing time that I will remember forever. His most thoughtful words to me were when I was first diagnosed with Parkinson’s. He said, “You have a job for life in this band.” I replied, “What if I can’t drum?” He said, “We’ll find something for you to do,” so I ended up playing the spoons. 

Do you think that your remarkable memory is simply due to genetics or a result of years having to remember so many songs? 

I put the memory thing down to the fact that I loved every minute of being in a band. It’s not just the Geldof band, but all the bands that I’ve been involved with. I can recall the musicians, most of the songs and how to play them, the venues, the years, etc.; it just seems to stay with me.

Don’t ask me to add and subtract as that part of my memory is definitely missing. 

Have you ever researched whether spicy food such as the Indian curry you so love, may have a positive effect on your brain?

I never looked into the benefits of spicy food on the brain.

Many musicians have a fondness for Indian curry and while visiting a new town with the band, someone would always be on the lookout for the best Indian restaurant.
My DNA tells me that way back many centuries ago, my ancestors are likely to be of Middle Eastern origin, so that’s good enough for me.

I love that your favourite television program during the 1960s was The Monkees! I was born in 1964 but I also remember watching that show when I was a kid and loving it. Have you ever been able to play with Mickey Dolenz? Did you know that he and Mike Nesmith went back on tour last year as The Monkees Present: The Mike and Mickey Show before Nesmith had a quadruple bypass? It might not be too late for you to jam with them! 

Yeah, as mentioned previously, The Monkees were a big part of my musical influences. Every Saturday evening, they were featured on our RTE channel. We only had one TV station in the sixties and music programs were few and far between. It was always ballad singers or light entertainment TV shows with very little choice for young people. Radio was the only option to hear the pop tunes of the day like The Beatles or The Rolling Stones. The Monkees were a breath of fresh air in a dull television schedule.

I met their drummer Mickey Dolenz in Nottingham, England in 1985 when he was working for a TV station. Charming man, and I told him how I would copy his drumming style with my air drumming in front of the television. He’s likely responsible for me being a left-handed drummer as he never seemed to set his kit up the same way twice. He wasn’t a drummer at all, just an actor who played drums in a TV show.

It would be cool to catch up with him again.

One of my favourite sections of your book was on the Thin White Duke. As a lifelong fan of David Bowie, your recollection of having once been his driver delighted me! Do you regret not telling him that you were Bob’s drummer? That was surely a big lesson that timing is everything!!

No, I don’t regret not telling David Bowie that I was a drummer. First rule of employment is that you do the job you were asked to do. My brief was that I wasn’t allowed to speak or ask questions unless I was spoken to. This is normal with celebrities and their hired drivers.

When the opportunity arose and I was just driving David on his own to rehearsal, we did have conversations about various things during the three weeks that I was his band’s driver. Anyway, he did find out that I was a drummer for Bob when both bands played at a concert in Paris a few weeks after my driving job finished.

He was a charming man and I’m so glad I was able to be that close to an icon of the music world.

Niall Power Dubai

Niall Power in Dubai. Photo by Mark Cowne.

Your book contains a very matter of fact outline of your career as a session drummer who travelled the world with many bands, but I noticed that you refrained from including saucy road stories about the types of antics that go on between traveling band mates. Surely, you have one or two amusing anecdotes to share in this regard? 

I’m sure you’ve heard of the phrase, “What happens on the road stays on the road.”  

Well you can’t blame a girl for trying!

On the road, you’ve rubbed shoulders with some of the greats in the music world. What was the single most exciting moment that you experienced and who was it with?

It has to be my first ever time to play live onstage, at the Liverpool Irish Centre in 1975.

Niall Power age 17.

1975 London, age 17.

For the previous four years I’d been bashing away at home, wondering if I was ever going to get it together as a drummer. I was a roadie for all of 1974 with a local band called Just Four. They invited me to go to England on tour with them and I managed to befriend their support group called Midnight who were based in Birmingham. I stayed in England after the tour and moved to London to stay with my friend Jim Sullivan and his family. Jim was the guitarist when we tried unsuccessfully to start our band in the Curragh some years previously. I had told Midnight that I was a drummer looking for a job, and if they were ever changing their drummer to get in touch with me in London.
I received a letter in the post a few months later to ask if I would like to return to Birmingham and join Midnight. I couldn’t believe it, I had never played onstage with a band before and that first gig in Liverpool was a blast. I was probably terrible on the night, but you have to start somewhere and that was where it all began. 

If you could have played with any musician in the world that you haven’t played with, who would you choose?

It has to be George Harrison.

I just loved his music and his vibe. Over the years I have played in many cover bands who performed Beatles tunes in their sets, but it would have been magic to get a chance to play “Here Comes the Sun” with George. 

You have travelled all over the world in your career. What is your favourite place to visit and why?

It would have to be India. We played there on three separate occasions and I loved it. The music is enthralling, the food is incredible, the friendly nature of the people and the sheer size of the place is amazing.

Driving anywhere is a task only to be undertaken by a kamikaze.

The sounds, smells, colours and the poverty have to be seen to be believed.
A truly wonderful country to visit.

Since you retired from drumming in 2015, you have been absorbed in genealogical research, both for yourself and others. What have you been doing in this regard since the publication of your book?

Initially, I only undertook the genealogical search for my own family tree. I found this process to be very helpful for my Parkinson’s situation as it gave me something positive to do after my diagnosis.

I needed a task to engage the brain, almost like doing a crossword puzzle and trying to find answers to the clues. There are many discrepancies on old documents, and it is painstaking work trying to decipher the handwriting and make sense of the information. I’m sure it helped me take my mind off the fact that I was losing the fine motor movements on my left side and my drumming skill was disappearing fast.

I have helped some friends with their own family research, but I’m not going to make a career out of it as it’s very time consuming.

Many Irish documents relating to births, marriages and deaths were destroyed by fire in the Irish Civil War, and only the 1901 and 1911 census records are available to view.
I’m still active with regard to my own family tree and I’ve traced many relations, in Canada and the USA. 

Are you and your wife, Michelle, still farming or working as entrepreneurs? 

Unfortunately, I can’t work anymore with my left hand shaking. It’s now 11 years since

Niall Power at home

Niall in 2016.

diagnosis and the motor skills on my left side are gradually disappearing. For example, I cannot put a letter into an envelope or hold a newspaper without my hand trembling.

I’m so used to the shaking that it that doesn’t bother me anymore, and even though it’s a progressive and incurable disease, I just get on with it and make the best of every day usually tending to the garden. Michelle is my career. 

Can you tell us more about your diet and exercise regime and anything else that has enabled you to make the best of your life with Parkinson’s disease?

Most people will tell you that they altered their diet after a Parkinson’s diagnosis, which I did. I did it as a reaction rather than a necessity. It’s a scary time and the need to do anything to solve the problem is great. My first move was to get supplements from the chemist and I also tried a course of acupuncture and meditation. No real benefits from any of these.

I was aged 50 at the time of diagnosis and in reasonably good shape, so I joined my local swimming club and gym. I rarely miss a day and workout on the treadmill and the bicycle, with some light weights. Then it’s into the pool where I power walk in the water and generally have some fun. This activity may not suit some Parkinson’s patients who have issues with their walking, but I find it very rewarding. You have to find something that works for you and stick with it. Never give up. 

How would you like to be able to help others who have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s? 

During the last year I spoke at a few Parkinson’s related events and basically, I just informed the patients about my exercise routine, and how good it can make you feel to do something for yourself that gives you enjoyment and has many other health benefits. 

What have you been doing since your book was published in 2017?

Since the publication of my book I’ve been trying to keep busy. I went to Australia last October and cycled around 1,200 kilometers in the glorious sunshine state of Queensland. My symptoms decreased significantly, and I will be informing my neurologist about this at my next checkup.

Timing Is Everything will be featured in the book nook at the World Parkinson Congress in Kyoto this year, and who knows, a cure may be soon be found.

Niall Power in 2018

Niall Power in 2018. Photo by Frank Smith.

Flamenco Guitarist Holly Blazina Introduces Debut Album Transcendencia on October 13, 2017

Holly Blazina Flamenco Guitarist

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 13, 2017

Calgary, AB flamenco guitarist, Holly Blazina will release her debut independent album, Transcendencia on October 13, 2017 through iTunes and Spotify.  Her CD release concert will be held at Decidedly Jazz Danceworks in Calgary on October 13 at 8:00 pm and tickets can be purchased online here. The album features nine compositions drawn from years of emersion, study, and collaboration in the flamenco music scene, both in Spain and Canada. Transcendencia was produced by Montreal-based performer, composer, and musical director, Amir Amiriand boasts accomplished players from the Canadian flamenco and world music scenes, bringing in modern elements not traditionally found in the genre, such as saxophone, violin, piano, and santur. The pieces were also workshopped with acclaimed flamenco guitarists, Paco Fernandez of Seville and San Fransisco’s, Ricardo Diaz.

The compositions on Transcendencia span a number of years from the time Blazina began writing in 2005, and parallels her experience in studying flamenco. “I decided it was time to truly actualize myself as an artist, which meant going beyond myself and living large. Recording these pieces was the most important step I could take in that direction,” Blazina explains. The arrangements explore the full expressive capacity of the nylon-stringed guitar, and for Blazina, cultivate a resilience that is both physically and emotionally demanding. She has refined ways of making the instrument truly speak, and claims space as an accomplished female player in a traditionally male-dominated genre.

ABOUT HOLLY BLAZINA Holly Blazina regularly performs as a soloist, in traditional Flamenco ensembles, as well as with other musicians from the jazz, classical and world music genres, delighting and inspiring audiences wherever she plays. She has performed as part of the Calgary International Flamenco Festival, and participates as an instructor and performer each year at Calgary’s Classical Guitarfest West. Holly has had the good fortune of studying intensively with renowned artists both in Spain and North America.

Website: www.hollyblazina.com | EPK: https://hollyblazina.com/epk/

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For more information, please contact: Jen Eisler, Publicist |
416-526-0969, jen@jeneisler.com http://www.jeneisler.com

Jen Eisler Publicity jen@jeneisler.com /416.526.0969 / jeneisler.com

Composer, Pianist Arash Behzadi to Perform at the Bali Spirit Festival March 19th to 26th, 2017

Arash Behzadi With Closed EyesTORONTO, March 16, 2017 /CNW/ – Toronto-based New Age composer and pianist, ARASH BEHZADI will return to Bali for a command performance at the coveted Bali Spirit Festival from March 19th to 26th, 2017 after his successful three sold out shows in January.

The musical narratives from Behzadi’s newly released CD, WITH CLOSED EYES, will be emitted through the keys of his piano during his Bali concert. As in the past, audience members will be deeply transported into a natural healing state that Behzadi’s pieces are known for. “Piano is very warm,” states Behzadi. “With one instrument and the emotion I pour into the ivory, I am able to touch people’s hearts no matter their age, era or culture. It’s important to me that my music moves people, has a lasting impression and is universal.”

Behzadi’s compelling solo piano performances have resonated with audiences in North America, Europe, and The Middle East. Whether performing in the middle of a frozen Canadian lake, in pouring rain in Geneva, or at The World Trade Center Club in Dubai, Behzadi intuitively understands how to captivate audiences young and old, often moving most to tears.

Celebrating its 10th Anniversary, The Bali Spirit Festival is one of the globe’s most inspiring events, gathering world-renowned musicians, yogis and dancers from every continent while attracting an international following of fans that are consciously invested in both spiritual and healing practices.

One World One Stage Bali Spirit Festival

For More Information:

http://www.balispiritfestival.com/programs/presenter/arash-behzadi

http://www.arashbehzadi.com

https://www.facebook.com/abehzadipiano

SOURCE Arash Behzadi

For further information: Media Enquiries: Irene Carroll | pr@arashbehzadi.com | 416.366.5473

Demystify Facebook & Instagram Marketing To Rock Your Online Presence!

Are you a musician, band or singer-songwriter who has been struggling to understand how to get any real traction with your social media marketing campaign? Do you have a Facebook page and an Instagram account but you just can’t seem to get any significant engagement from your fans and have no real idea how to use those platforms to expand your audience? Well, I have just the stocking stuffer for you this Christmas. Let me help you to demystify Facebook and Instagram marketing so you can rock your online presence!

It has been a long time coming but I am super stoked to FINALLY announce the availability for purchase of my Facebook & Instagram marketing guides, in PDF format, on my website now. For only CDN$9.97 (via PayPal), you will receive some very helpful and up-to-date information that will demonstrate how to effectively utilize both Facebook and Instagram for marketing and make you a pro at using them in no time!

Facebook Cover

70 Tips For Rockin’ Your Facebook Page

If you’re having trouble decoding the mysteries of Facebook Pages, this guide is for you! Christine Bode of Scully Love Promo has created an easy-to-read, numbered list of 70 ways that you can take your Page from demo to mastered.

CLICK HERE: https://scullylovepromo.com/services/products/ and follow the simple instructions to purchase this 8 page e-book and download the digital PDF file through PayPal.

CDN $9.97

 

Instagram CoverWhat Musicians Need to Know About Instagram Marketing

If your target audience is under the age of 35, you need to be on Instagram! Find out how to use this incredible mobile phone app successfully to give more exposure to your brand and your music in Christine’s easy-to-read, point form guide. #instasick

CLICK HERE: https://scullylovepromo.com/services/products/ and follow the simple instructions to purchase this 7 page e-book and download the digital PDF file through PayPal.

CDN $9.97

(Cover images created by Donna Wood of Enovations Designs.)

You don’t have to be a musician to receive benefit from these guides. They will assist anyone who is using Facebook or Instagram for marketing purposes and just can’t figure out how to get the most out of those sites. Always remember that with social media marketing, the emphasis should be on SOCIAL and not MARKETING. Be sure to adhere to the 80/20 rule and make 80% of your posts social, offering value or entertainment to your fans, allowing them to get to know you better, and keep your promotional (hard sell) posts to 20%. Your goal is to build relationships and make friends.

It’s time to demystify Facebook and Instagram marketing and rock your online presence! YOU CAN DO IT!

“Stay In The Boat”: Troubadour Wyatt Easterling’s Poignant Ode to the Depressed

Wyatt EasterlingI’m just getting to know Country, Americana & Folk troubadour and producer Wyatt Easterling through Music Business Mentoring, a platform he launched earlier this year with singer-songwriters Marlene D’Aoust and Jen Smith that features an incredible resource of leading music industry professionals who are acting as mentors to those who are trying to find their way in a very challenging business.

When life feels like it’s too much to handle we may think about stepping out, but that’s a permanent solution to a temporary problem. Things are seldom as bad as they seem so I say: “Stay In The Boat.” ~ Wyatt Easterling

Wyatt doesn’t know that I struggle with depression and may not know that I’ve been grieving the death of my sister and best friend, Karen, who passed away 14 months ago from ovarian cancer leaving her husband and twelve-year-old twins behind. To say it’s been a challenging couple of years for me and my family has been an understatement. I have often not wanted to “stay in the boat” myself but I’m fortunate to have enough support in my life to keep me from jumping over board. However, not everyone does.

As synchronicity would have it, Wyatt reached out to me and shared his song “Stay In The Boat” because he noticed a post I made on behalf of my client, ArtsCan Circle, about the rising aboriginal suicide rate in Ontario and he thought I might like to share it with ArtsCan Circle colleagues and supporters. ArtsCan Circle is a not-for-profit organization that sends teams of musicians and artists to remote Indigenous communities engaging groups of children and youth in workshops to facilitate creative expression and teach skills in playing musical instruments, songwriting, visual arts and performance arts. ArtsCan Circle gives those at-risk youth a reason to “stay in the boat.” So, not only would I like to share this thoughtful, poignant song with them, but I’d like to share it with you too and with anyone who suffers from depression.

Former head of A&R for Atlantic Records Nashville, songwriter, producer,  executive and session player, Wyatt Easterling describes the inspiration behind his song:

Stay In The Boat

“A life long friend of mine called me back in the summer as I sat on a plane waiting to pull away Stay In The Boatfrom the gate, and as we talked, he began to reveal to me that he was suffering through a growing discontentment with the world around him. As the conversation progressed I began to realize that he was slipping into a serious depression and I became uneasy with some of his dark humor.  When he pointed out that I would know what happened if his sailboat came ashore one day without him, I could only say “hang in there,” things will be brighter tomorrow.

About this time the flight attendant said I’d have to turn off my phone to prepare for takeoff, but before I did I fired off a text to my pal: “We don’t know what tomorrow will bring so just stay in the boat.” Isn’t it funny how we always make a stab at humor when we don’t know what to say?

I spent the next three weeks touring from Michigan out to Alberta, Canada checking in with my friend, as frequently as guys will do, which is to say about once a week. My way of broaching the subject was to simply ask: “How ya doing,” his response: “I’m still in the boat.” “Just stay in the boat” became our motto as we hung up with each other.

This song came together over the ensuing miles in the car, running along the Bow River in Calgary and hanging out in airports. I finished it during a 4-hour layover in Charlotte waiting for a 25-minute flight to Raleigh.

Two days after I got home from my tour Robin Williams did the unthinkable. A week later I was in Nashville producing a cd for an artist and as fate would have it there was time to record this song. If you think it could help someone please pass it along.”

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

When you don’t quite know what to say to your loved one who is suffering from depression, try sharing this song with them or with anyone whom you believe would gain comfort from it.

“Stay In The Boat” is available through CD Baby and iTunes.

www.wyatteasterling.com

Introducing Laurie Brown of LJB Artist Management (Managing with Integrity)

LJB Artist Management LogoFor those of you who are following Scully Love Promo and me, Christine Bode, through social media, you’ve probably noticed that I have updated my website but I no longer have a Facebook business page. I deleted it about a year ago because at this point, as a solopreneur who works with musicians & artists, I don’t have the budget to pay to play on Facebook.

However, I have been utilizing the power of Twitter (for free) to make new connections and recently had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of a lady who I have a lot in common with. We both work in the music industry and think a lot alike in terms of how important it is to help each other out there in the social media stratosphere in order that we can all be successful at what we do.

Meet Edmonton based Laurie Brown of LJB Management (Artist Management), an artist manager with integrity, who can help both part-time and full-time musicians manage their day-to-day business operations and build their career.

With a professional designation in “Music Business – Artist Management” from Berklee College of Music, Artist Manager, Laurie Brown can bring a wealth of experience and organizational skills to your career and allow you, the artist, to do what you do best – create and play music.

MANAGEMENT SERVICES:

Craig Moritz and Laurie Brown

Country singer-songwriter Craig Moritz with his manager, Laurie Brown.

LJB Management offers services for full-time and part-time musicians whose careers have reached the point where they need assistance with day-to-day business operations. LJB Management helps artists with Career Planning, Grant Writing, Copyrights, Royalty Collection, Festival and Showcase Submissions, Branding, Corporate and Event Bookings and more.

MANAGEMENT CONSULTING and PROJECT WORK:

Not every artist needs to have a full-time manager on monthly retainer. SOME artists need assistance with SOME projects SOME of the time. LJB Management also offers management consulting services, tailored to each individual artist’s needs, at an hourly rate. Assistance with industry driven projects such as SOCAN paperwork, grant writing, showcase and festival submissions, and building a business/career plan is provided on a “per project” basis.

CORPORATE BOOKING:

LJB Management has a unique and diversified roster of talent to bring to corporate and private events. Whether planning a corporate party, family event, charitable fundraiser, sporting event, or any other gathering where entertainment is required, LJB Management will have an artist that will fit the bill.

INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS and AFFILIATIONS:

Alberta Music Industry Association (AMIA)
Association of Country Music in Alberta (ACMA)
Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA)
Western Canadian Music Association (WCMA)
Music Managers Forum (MMF)
Arts Touring Alliance of Alberta (ATAA)

Laurie keeps her rates as low as possible as she knows how tough it is for artists these days.  Her rates for consulting are $50 per hour (a normal consult is about 2 hours) and $25 per hour for projects. She will do an estimate on the project so the artist knows up front what the costs will be.  If the hours are higher she’ll honour her original estimate (as long as the project hasn’t changed drastically) and if the hours are lower, she charges the lesser rate. For grants, the fees vary depending on what type of grant you are applying for and what is required (i.e.: marketing plans add a lot of time to an application if the artist does not already have one), but Laurie will provide a quote for grant writing as well.

If you’re looking for Laurie’s expertise, don’t hesitate to contact her.

Website: www.ljbartistmanagement.com
Email: ljbmanagement@live.ca
Phone: 780-446-1849

You may not have visited the Our Global Team page on my website, but if you haven’t, take a look, and you will learn about the people on my team who I’m more than willing to refer to anyone who may need their services. They are all trust-worthy individuals who excel at what they do and their services are complimentary to my own. If you think you’d be a good fit and would like to join Our Global Team, please contact me.

World Fiddle Day Toronto is Saturday, May 16, 2015 at Fort York

World Fiddle Day TorontoMedia Release: April 24, 2015

WORLD FIDDLE DAY TORONTO
Saturday, May 16 at Fort York
10 am to 5:30 pm

CONTACT: Anne Lederman: (416) 538-9036 or anne.lederman@gmail.com www.worldfiddledaytoronto.ca
World Fiddle Day Toronto on Facebook

Imagine 50 – 100 fiddlers in one place, playing 40 tunes from 25 different countries. Accompanying them is a fantastic back-up band of world percussion, clarinet, and keys celebrating world music. Join our Guest Artists (see below) for an afternoon concert, and then stay for the giant community “Around-the-World” Fiddle Jam.

The countdown is on! All activities from noon on are FREE at Fort York on May 16th. Please help spread the word far and wide. You can come and enjoy a great concert with Subhadra Vijarykumar (Carnatic fiddling from India), Chris McKhool and Kevin Laliberte (Sultans of String), The Metis Fiddler Quartet and Soozi Shlangar and Peter Jellard of Swamperella. After that, it’s our Around-the-World jam led by Anne Lederman, Lea Kirstein, Eli Bender with great house band: Tom Leighton, Ben Grossman and Martin Van de Ven. Last year we had 60 fiddles, this year we’re aiming for a 100. There’s still two practice sessions left and workshops in the morning of with our guest artists.

10:00 11:30 Workshops with Guest Artists $20.

World Fiddle Day Toronto Workshops

12:30 2:00 Guest Artists Concert

2:30 5:30 Around-the-World” Fiddle Jam with Anne Lederman, Lea Kirstein, Eli Bender, Martin Van de Ven, Tom Leighton and Ben Grossman.

WORLD ARTISTS CONCERT AND WORKSHOPS

Subhadra Vijaykumar Subhadra Vijaykumar (violin with Arun Ramachandran (mrdangam): A Toronto based Carnatic (South Indian) violinist and the Artistic Director of Radha Carnatic Violin Creations, Subhadra performs the unique music of South India throughout Canada and internationally for classical Indian dance performances and solo concerts.

Chris McKhool (6-string violin) & Kevin Laliberté (guitar): Chris plays a six-Chris McKhool and Kevin Lalibertestring electro-acoustic violin and is known both for his world music performances with Sultans of String and his music for young people. With Kevin, he creates a playful relationship with the flamenco guitar, where acoustic strings meet with electronic wizardry.

Soozi Schlanger & Peter JellardSoozi Schlanger & Peter Jellard: Soozi and Peter, our resident ambassadors of the bayou are founding members of Swamperellara. For over 20 years they have immersed themselves in Cajun and Zydeco music, taking it to festivals around the world.

Métis Fiddler Quartet: Born in Winnipeg, the MFQ take old Aboriginal fiddle Métis Fiddler Quartettraditions from the prairies and give them new life. They have performed across Canada and internationally, including the Vancouver Olympics. Their debut album, North West Voyage, (2012) won a Canadian Folk Music Award for “Best Traditional Album.”

Watch Last Year’s Jam on YouTube

Thanks to: Long & McQuade; Fort York; Toronto Arts Council; Mariposa in the Schools.

April Wine Co-Founder & Juno Hall of Fame Inductee Jim Henman to Play Ben’s Pub on Thurs. Nov. 28

Jim Henman at Ben's Pub in KingstonApril Wine co-founder and Juno Hall of Fame Inductee Jim Henman will be performing a solo show at Ben’s Pub in Kingston on Thursday, November 28, 2013 at 7:30 pm. Jim’s country blues solo work is featured on his latest album, Same Old Feeling, (Ravenwood Records) and can be streamed here. 

Tickets for Jim’s Ben’s Pub appearance are $15 and available by contacting jill_relyea@hotmail.com.

Somewhere between the rhymthic yodeling of “The Singing Brakeman,” Jimmie Rodgers and the flavorful grooves of ragtime guitarist/singer, Blind Blake lies the roots of Jim Henman’s musical beginnings. Writing his first tune, at age 12, Jim spent much of his youth strumming a Stella acoustic guitar on the sandy shores of Clam Harbour, Nova Scotia. By the mid-60s, Jim, with high school friends Myles Goodwyn, Greg Stephen, Dave Dodsworth & Doug Grace started the top 40 band, “Woodies Termites.” Jim and Myles went on to co-found the Canadian rock band, April Wine, in the fall of 1969 with Jim’s cousins, David and Ritchie Henman. Jim, David and Ritchie, along with George Mack, had formed the band Prism from late 1968 until summer 1969.  April Wine moved to Montréal in 1970, signing with Aquarius Records.

Shortly after the release of their debut album in 1971, Jim decided to leave the band, moving back to the East Coast to start a family and pursue a career in Medical Technology. While his career as a professional musician may have been put on hiatus, Jim remained connected to the musical community in Halifax, continuing to write music and performing locally.

Jim officially re-emerged onto the East Coast music scene in the 90s, co-writing and co-producing the album, More Than My Share for Cape Breton singer, Jeannie Beks. He also co-wrote the music for “Death the Musical,” a stage production performed both at Halifax’s Neptune Theatre and in French, at Théâtre Génération in Montréal. This musical score was later released on CD. In addition to writing and producing, Jim also began performing in songwriters’ circles throughout Nova Scotia, alongside artists such as Terry Kelly, Laura Smith and Cheryl Gaudet.

Despite the mainstream success of April Wine, Jim’s contribution to the band can hardly be deemed his greatest musical accomplishment. Over the past thirty years, Jim has dedicated his passion, enthusiasm and expertise to numerous projects, much of which hold special meaning in his life. One such project, “Night to Remember,” was a musical event (held annually for four years) that Jim co-produced along with Halifax entrepreneur Joe Graves, in support of recovery homes for men and women in Halifax.

In keeping a promise to his late friend, Canadian blues artist, Rick Jeffery, Jim completed and produced Rick’s final album, 13 Vultures in 2009. The CD/DVD was released at the Dutch Mason Blues Festival in July 2009 with a twenty member tribute band who performed select tracks from the album. The tribute band included various artists from the Maritime Blues scene, including, Joe Murphy, Thersea Melenfant, Pam Marsh, Wayne Nicholson, Carter Chaplin, A. Jardine, Charlie Phillips, Mike Legget, and Shirley Jackson.

In 2009 Jim was installed along with April Wine in to the Canadian Music Industry Hall Of Fame and in April 2010, Jim had the great honour of receiving a Juno award, commemorating April Wine’s induction into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. Indeed, this is the ultimate achievement for any musician.

For Jim, this award has been somewhat bittersweet; prompting sentiments of accomplishment and nostalgia. Yet, in many ways, this award has also provided a sense of closure on this chapter of his musical career, while  providing the ideal momentum for propelling him into new directions and establishing new beginnings as a solo artist.

And I’ll Let That Big Old Whistle Blow My Blues Away by Jay Aymar

Jay AymarJay Aymar is a self-described ramblin’ Canadian songwriter who mixes elements of folk, roots & country music with thoughtful, often poetic lyrics. I’m thinking that he’s the natural successor to Stompin’ Tom Connors in fact. There aren’t many singers like Jay Aymar – an honest journeyman of music – and there aren’t many bloggers out there like Jay either. His blog Road Stories reveals this Gen-x troubadour’s musings on life, love and livin’ on the road. I like to think of Jay as my friend and I try to read his blogs whenever I can find the time because they’re like sitting round a campfire and listening to him wax philosophical with me over a few beers. I recently read this one and loved it so much that I told Jay and he said I was free to pass it on in any way I wished. Now, it’s true, he’s long-winded, but believe me, he always has a point, and the journey to that point is always fun.  ‘And I’ll let that big old whistle blow my blues away’ was originally published on Jay’s Road Stories blog on October 23, 2013.

A recent review from the bible of roots magazines in Canada – Penguin EggsJay Aymar Overtime on Jay Aymar’s latest CD, Overtime:

 Judging by the maturity, sophistication and clever bent to his lyrics and delivery, he has not been resting on his laurels, such as they maybe….there is no quibble about raising him to the higher rungs on the steep ladder of Canadian singer/songwriters, not just his contemporaries but of all time.” Doug Swanson, Summer 2013, Penguin Eggs Magazine

 

‘And I’ll let that big old whistle blow my blues away’

“I was conceived in the summer of love
a little bundle of joy sent down from above
and while a half a million hippies left Yasgur with some trash
I was rockin’ in the cradle to the sweet Johnny Cash”

This is from my song ‘Seriously Delirious’ which I put out in 2011 on the CD ‘Passing Through’.

It’s 100% autobiographical and was written as a result of meeting the legendary John Prine.

My girlfriend at the time bought some tickets to Massey Hall to see John perform and somehow managed to get us backstage to meet him. Was it George Bernard Shaw who suggested being wary of meeting ones idols for fear that it will only lead to future disappointment for the fan? I believe it was.

We lined up backstage to acquire autographs, one by one. He signed my copy of Fair and Square – ‘All the best  Jay’ … John Prine.  All the Best – being a song from his comeback album The Missing Years. Still one of my favourite CD’s of all time. I rank it next to Graceland for the surprise comeback and enjoyment factor. (well maybe that’s a stretch but it’s one hell of a piece of work). While we posed for photos with him and the band we were encouraged to stick around for some food and to simply hang out. Wow! What a nice gesture. I believe my level of knowledge about his catalogue and back story was enough to ingratiate ourselves into this party for an extended hang.

Then I was afforded some time to just sit and talk with John himself.  After our conversation (during which he had learned that he was a major influence on me as a writer) he shouted out to the band “Bring these two out for a few drinks tonight and tell them some lies about us!”

“I can’t go out drinking right now but these guys could be into it Jay.”

At which point, his guitar player Jason Wilbur said he was obligated to call his wife for a long chat and couldn’t go out, however, Dave – his double bass player said “Sure…sounds like fun!”

So we went out to a local martini bar and discussed the Nashville music scene with Dave for about three hours.

So much of what happens to us in life is by sheer coincidence or luck. Dave mentioned that the go-to bass player for a few shows in Nashville (where Prine lives) was unavailable and he ran into a guy on the street that same night who tipped him off and suggested he might be able to get him in as a filler. Long story short, he’s been touring with John ever since. That’s going back about ten years now. I believe Dave’s married with children and finally taking deep breaths knowing the financial ‘wolf is finally from the door’.

At the end of the evening, he’d likely heard my girlfriend going on about my songwriting and John’s influence to the point where he took some pity on us and offered us to come along for the next show in London. Wow! What a guy.

“Just show up at the theatre tomorrow and pick up your backstage passes at the window and come join us after the show!”

Done.

We arrived in London (ON) the following day and were escorted to the fifth row from the front of the stage. Remarkable seats. I took it all in and sat transfixed like a kid in a candy store drooling over the embarrassment of riches. From ‘Hello in There’ to ‘Lake Marie’ (Dylan’s favourite Prine song) to ‘Grandpa was a Carpenter’ and on and on.

We reconnected again after the show and another great visit. It was during this conversation where the discussion of autobiographical writing came up. Writing a song specifically about oneself. The idea being that if you write a few of those songs ‘specifically’ about yourself, then you won’t have to waste precious time explaining to folks after the show exactly who you are – what your purpose is – what you’re all about…essentially.

I went home and started the song Seriously Delirious.

Verse 2
“My old man engineered that train
Like a streak bolt of lightning right through the rain
He said keep your head steady son and don’t look back
and that’s how you keep the train on the track”

After my dad (John Delbert Aymar) returned home from serving the entirety of WW2, he wanted to explore the world away from his village near Saulnierville, NS.  Still in his early twenties, he decided to head into Toronto with his cousin. The point being, whenever anyone of us has leaned on him for advice or felt down about things, he’s always said “The past is the past. Look forward. You can’t change the past. If I were to have dwelled upon the events of that war then how could have I managed to move on?”

It always seemed like such a dial-in answer for many years, but as always, these types of sentiments as simple as they appear, hold powerful truths for a reason.  I often saw my dad as the engineer of his train. He was pulling eight box cars and mom holding down the Caboose and keeping it all together. (Perhaps it’s the female spirit that looks back and keeps our history into perspective – I’m not sure, but I do know my mom was amazing at grounding us in family tradition.) So, I wrote those words about my Dad as a train engineer and made the “rockin in the cradle to the sweet Johnny Cash” reference quite deliberately – as a bit of an inside joke within the family.

You see, my dad has this old Hawaiian guitar he picked up from a guy he visited in prison. As the story goes, he visited an old acquaintance in the Comeauville jail.  During the visit, the guy wanted five bucks for his cheap guitar (evidently for a carton of cigarettes). The transaction went down and this was ultimately become the first guitar I would see in my life. 

It had painted palm trees and various birds and a Hawaiian sunset on the front of it. It was a Spanish guitar with nylon strings. It seemed more of a prop or a toy then a real guitar. My earliest childhood memories are of my dad popping his collar, pretending to play that guitar while gyrating his hips like Elvis – screaming ‘YOU AIN’T NOTHING BUT A HOUND DOG’  in front of all of us. I was transfixed.

I remember the very, very first record player was a small stand alone player with just a few records in the rack below it.

Johnny Cash’s Greatest Hits sat amongst the few gems. I believe it was of his early Sun recordings and it was incredible.

For the longest time, it all just made sense to me. The cheap guitar from a guy in prison – was that Folsom Prison? The train songs the rockabilly beat. The joy it brought. It taught me so much.

That said, our family was not even remotely into country music.

My dad’s true passion was swing jazz and crooners. At 92 he can still sing Nat King Cole’s Mona Lisa and send the shiver up the spine of anyone who’d care to listen. The only reason that album ever made it into our house was through my brother Dave (likely) or Bob (also likely).

So as time marched on, I learned that it was all connected. Everything. Prine was influenced by Cash. Cash didn’t really do time in prison other than for a few public intoxication’s. Our family guitar was from a guy in prison. I eventually discovered the epic Live from Folsom and Live from San Quentin Cash albums. I eventually discovered the entire world of fiction based on these themes – from Voltaire’s Candide to Crime and Punishment …oh hell…it goes on and on. From learning about Mandela to watching movies like Cool Hand Luke.

It can seem like a romantic notion in some ways to think that Johnny Cash performed for the incarcerated. A selfless gesture indeed. Those live recordings capture the palpable energy of a man in his prime, singing to those without a lot of hope.  What could that be like? Wow…only Cash could have pulled that off.  Until it was asked of me. I said ‘ABSOLUTELY YES!’

Wait…what? Really? What just happened?

Early last week I received an email from Jill Zmud, a talented folk songwriter, community activist and all around cool girl from Ottawa, ON. She coordinates a program called Art Beat which connects folk musicians with local schools and hospitals (for starters). During a previous conference, for example, I volunteered to discuss ‘FOLK MUSIC’ and ‘SONGWRITING’ and ‘LIFE ON THE ROAD’ to about 60 grade 7-8 students at a southern Ontario elementary school. It was amazing! As always, these gestures always pay us back ten-fold. The discussion with the kids slowly turned into me talking about how folk music has always represented the underdog.

“You kids want change? How we gonna do that? Folk music?”

and the kids screamed out “YEAH!”

“OK… I propose we have big speakers playing music during lunch break in the cafeteria! Why don’t we have music playing during lunch?” Who wants music?”

Repeat after me “WE WANT MUSIC…WE WANT MUSIC!”

“LOUDER…STOMP YOUR FEET…I WANT YOU TO ALL STOMP YOUR FEET AND SCREAM SO LOUD THAT THE PRINCIPLE WILL COME UP HERE AND FINALLY LISTEN TO US!”

And they did. And the principle arrived at the door a few minutes later. Strapped with my guitar, I whispered to him in the hallway, ‘Just play along, I’m teaching them how to protest!”

And he was brilliant. He stormed into the classroom to become a perfect foil.

“What’s all this about?”

“We want music in the cafeteria during lunch hour!”

The kids laughed, the teacher laughed, I laughed and I had them sing my one and only children’s song ‘Apple Pickin’ and we all walked away richer for the experience. I’ve often thought if I were to retire from music, teaching would be such a noble profession.

Art Beat had worked it’s magic. Everyone benefited from the experience.

Now this time, Jill’s Art Beat email was a bit different. “Jay, we’ve been trying to have a correctional facility sign up for Art Beat for many years…and it finally happened! They’ve agreed to let a performer come in and sing! We thought of you immediately.”

“Why did you think of me Jill? Have you been looking through my past? lol…”

“No we were just discussing your record and …”

“My RECORD! How did I know it was illegal to smoke weed in Cuba?”

“No Jay, your latest record – OVERTIME

“Oh yeah…of course – Overtime!” (Thank you Tommy Chong)

I guess word had spread a bit about my Johnny Cash fixation. Playing tributes on occasion and singing Cash songs long – long before he was cool again. In fact I remember singing his songs during the late 80′s and early 90′s when people would grimace. Yes, there was a time for a while when he was dismissed and this always seemed strange to me.

Regardless, I agreed to perform in the Brampton Correctional Facility last Thursday as a part of Art Beat.

Without thinking about it too much, I simply romanticized the task at hand and embraced the concept.

Hey Aymar (I said to myself), you’ve been singing about this stuff for so long, now it’s time to embrace the fact that the river has led you here. This amazing journey has actually brought you to this place. Ok here we go.

I arrived at the front desk on Thursday at 1pm. Without giving this any thought whatsoever I mentioned my name and purpose and they led me to the recreation room. In came the men who sat in a circular format in front of me. Several guards were on hand to brief me in a room prior to the concert.

They introduced me as a Canadian songwriter who tours ‘all around the world’ and ‘has just finished a 120 show tour’ which was all true, but it seemed to really give the guys (perhaps) a sense that I WAS Johnny Cash as someone immediately screamed out “CASH!”

As I prepared for the first song, the warden leaned into my ear and whispered “You’ll be fine son…they’re an appreciative audience!”

As I was about to hit the first chord, I looked up and saw the crowd. Something happened when I looked into the faces of the guys staring at me. I was grief stricken. Can’t explain it. I began to tremble on the inside. This wasn’t a nervousness or fear, but in fact a deep, deep feeling of empathy. I didn’t know what to do. I hadn’t prepared for this. After thousands of shows in my life, I’d never felt this stuck. This feeling became overwhelming. This wasn’t a fucking joke – nothing about this was like Johnny Cash in Folsom….my dad buying a guitar from a guy in prison…Cool Hand Luke. Those fantasy images were just that. Fantasy! This was reality – I was in the middle of it – and I was suddenly grief stricken by the stark realness of it all.

Behind the men was a booth where two guards watched the proceedings from above everyone. It was all cool and controlled. I played my first original song then quickly got back to the CASH request. I said ‘Who was requesting Johnny Cash?” Someone from the back raised his hand. I said “Ok man, how about A Boy Named Sue!”

And off it went. During that Silverstein classic is a verse where the father ‘took out a knife and cut off a piece of my ear” …at which point everyone laughed out loud and FINALLY the tension was cut.

I was beyond relieved.

I looked up into the tower and saw two of the guards clapping and dancing a bit which eased my mind a bit more.

Then I asked if there were any guitar players in the crowd. Someone yelled out “Honky-Tonk!”

“Where’s Honky-Tonk?”

And he was right there off to the side. Humbly raising his hand.

“You feel like playing a song for everyone Honky-Tonk? Who wants to hear Honky-Tonk?” The place erupted and much like the elementary kids pretending to protest,  the guys began chanting “Honky-Tonk! Honky-Tonk!”

It was just then that I realized I may have been breaking protocol but they allowed Honky-Tonk to come and join me for the rest of the show. He was escorted to a room where his guitar awaited and arrived ready for showtime. He was a great player and was happy to sit back and simply accompany me with some picking on the songs.

Then, as though time evaporated, I looked up at the clock to realize the concert was over and my John Henry was required for a few pieces of paper.

Before I left, the staff and I had a brief conversation about ‘simple gestures of kindness’ in this type of environment. On how there may be an outside chance that ONE inmate may have seen light in all of this…a seed may have been planted in some soul…enough to hold on to…HOPE. I welled up.

I finally made it out to my car – shaking. I sat in the parking lot for twenty minutes, closed my eyes and said some prayers to the great universe asking for my own redemption. “Save those souls and give them hope. Thank you for bringing me into this world with all of the advantages of love. Thanks for allowing me to have the opportunity, strength and gift to do this.”

Then I thought about my own dad. Not the guy from “A Boy Named Sue” but the guy who stood up in front of me with his Hawaiian guitar, shaking his hips, screaming “HOUND DOG!” That guy. The same guy who said “Never look back – you can’t change the past”, the guy who provided for his eight children day in a day out without ever complaining. The loyal husband and father who kept us all on the straight and narrow. The same guy who bought the record player for his family (when we didn’t have a lot of extra money) so he could play his trad jazz and we could play our rock and roll.

I left the parking lot and drove to the four day conference where like-minded folkies had converged on a hotel in Mississauga.  Remember: GIVING BACK – PAYING IT FORWARD -this is all run of the mill kind of stuff for people in this community. It’s all part of the tradition. It’s part of the spirit. I felt safe here amongst this tribe. There were times over the weekend though that I couldn’t ‘shake’ the feeling of what had transformed me during that prison concert. In fact, there were times when I couldn’t stop smiling about it – and times when I couldn’t hide my grief. Never have I carried around so many mixed emotions from one incident.

Upon my arrival home the first person to call me up was my dad.

“Good morning son, I just wanted to know how the concert in the prison worked out?” I gave him detailed account of the events and asked “Dad, I’m not sure why I have these mixed emotions about it all? It’s like I don’t understand how I feel about what happened? Strange isn’t it?”

“It’s not strange at all. I really did expect this. Sometimes we don’t have answers for how we feel.  Just move on. It’s over!”

Just like the song:
‘Keep your head steady and don’t look back
That’s how you keep the train on the track’

In a few short months, I’ll be back at home sharing Christmas with the family. We’ll enjoy music and laughter once again.

As always I’ll be performing a local show, only this year I’ll have a new song to be added to my repertoire: John Prine’s Christmas in Prison. Dedicated to my Dad, Prine and his band, Cash, the Brampton Correctional Facility, Art Beat, Folk Music Ontario and the great healing power of music.

Next stop…

FURTHER DOWN THE LINE.