Bridget Jones: Mad About The Boy by Helen Fielding

Bridget Jones Mad About The Boy by Helen FieldingBook Review
Title: Bridget Jones Mad About The Boy
Author:  Helen Fielding
Publisher: Knopf Canada
Released: October 15, 2013
Pages: 386
ISBN-10: 0345807952
ISBN-13: 978-0345807953
Stars:  4.0

I’ll never forget reading Bridget Jones’s Diary. It was July 1998 and I was traveling through Ireland on my own for the first time. Helen Fielding’s iconic masterpiece was referred to me by my best friend who’d had it referred to her by a close girlfriend. I was sick with a terrible head cold and spent one day in the most miserable B&B in all of Ireland, I’m sure (Goin’ My Way in Dublin), trying to take care of myself. The room wasn’t clean, the mattresses were about three inches thick, the sheets musty, the pillow as flat as a pancake. There were cracks in the window and cobwebs everywhere. But I was too sick to care. It was cheap and I needed to just stay in bed and so I did and I read Bridget Jones’s Diary and I couldn’t put it down because I absolutely loved it!

Helen Fielding has been dubbed “the grandmother of chicklit” by Barbara Walters and I hadn’t read anything like chicklit before reading Bridget Jones’s Diary. She had created a single, thirty-something character who was bright, funny, insecure and far from perfect who had a circle of eccentric but loving friends and that’s almost exactly who I saw myself as at that time (I was 34). Bridget Jones is a woman that almost all women can relate to and in the third and long-time-coming novel about her, Bridget Jones Mad About The Boy, I can still relate to her 51-year-old self even though I’ve never married, had children, or had a partner die on me.

It’s no longer a surprise that Fielding decided to kill off the suave and debonair Mark Darcy (who loved Bridget “just the way she is”) and in fact, fans everywhere were horrified when they first heard the news. But it’s okay…really! The book only suffers a little from the fact that Darcy is not in it because his spirit certainly is and there are new characters that are almost as charming. Bridget still logs her calories and time spent tackling to-do lists in her diary. She still calls her pervert ex-boss Daniel Cleaver a friend, and while she’s more clean-living than she was in her 30s, she’s still as neurotic as she tries to figure out her way through raising two young children by herself while maneuvering through online dating in 2013. Of course it helps a lot that Darcy left her a fortune and she doesn’t really have to work to support her family. If he hadn’t this would have been a completely different book.

As the story begins, our heroine has been saved from her status as a born-again virgin by her soon to be 30-year-old toy boy Roxster whom she met on Twitter, but she doesn’t know how or whether she should invite him to her friend Talitha’s 60th birthday party, and she’s just discovered her children Mabel and Billy have head lice. Bridget is now attempting a career as a screenwriter and is adapting Ibsen’s Hedda Gabbler into a story relevant to modern women even though she thinks it was written by Chekhov and doesn’t know how to spell Gabler. She’s dealing with email inbox bombs, histrionic soccer moms, and trying to grow her followers on Twitter (while studying the Dalai Lama’s tweets). She has not got over the death of Mark, five years earlier, and she doesn’t know if she ever will. After the opening Prologue, Fielding takes us back to one year earlier and we find out how this situation came about.

There are appearances here by Daniel, Tom, Jude, Magda & Jeremy, Bridget’s mum and her friends Woney & Cosmo, but we also get to know Chloe the nanny, Perfect Nicolette, the Class Mother, gym teacher Mr. Wallaker (rather like Daniel Craig in appearance), first date Leatherjacketman, neighbour Rebecca, her eternally busy & bumbling agent Brian Katzenberg, and of course there’s a lot of flirtatious texting with Roxster in between Mummy moments. Bridget’s kids are endearing and into Minecraft and Plants versus Zombies too. However, none of the supporting characters in Mad About The Boy will ever be quite as appealing as Mark Darcy, but that doesn’t mean that this isn’t a fun, enjoyable read.

By Part Three of the book, Descent Into Chaos, Bridget’s life makes another U-turn and everything we supposed was going to happen, doesn’t. This is a good thing because the ending is a surprise. The tone changes and so does Bridget but there is an opening here for another volume, somewhere down the road.

The constant in Mad About The Boy is the comedy sprinkled with truly touching moments as expressed in a way that only Bridget Jones can. What really struck home for me this time was her decision to attend an obesity clinic to help her get her weight under control so she wouldn’t have to be a born-again virgin forever which is precisely what I’ve been going through for the past three months, during which time I haven’t eaten food but have been surviving on Optifast shakes, water, diet drinks and coffee with Stevia (I’ve lost 38 lbs).

The chapters on How Not To Do Dating, The Number One Key Dating Rule (DO NOT TEXT WHEN DRUNK) and Escalating Dating Incompetence are particularly hilarious. While I, too, find it easy enough to shag younger men, they’re not in it for a relationship and I can’t find anyone my own age with either integrity or baggage that’s light enough for me to carry. The thing is, Bridget Jones, even though she’s a fictional character, gives me hope! And that is the essence of her long-lasting appeal. She gives us all hope that we can figure out a way to get through the crap that life slings at us without totally losing our sense of humour and without having to give up on the notion that we’re entirely loveable just the way we are.

Single In The City by Michele Gorman

Single in the City by Michele Gorman

BOOK PREVIEW

Hey ladies,

Lookin’ for a fun in the sun summer read? Look no further!

Take one twenty six year old American, add to a two thousand year old city, add a big dose of culture clash and stir

To think Hannah ever believed that Americans differed from Brits mainly in pronunciation, sophistication and dentistry. That’s been the understatement of a lifetime. She lands upon England’s gentle shores with no job, no friends and no idea how she’s supposed to build the life she’s dreaming of. Armed with little more than her enthusiasm, she charges headlong into London, baffling the locals in her pursuit of a new life, new love and sense of herself.

REVIEWS

“If you like your novels fun and sassy with a twist of the unexpected, you’ll devour Single in the City. 4 stars.” The Sun 

“I expected the book to be funny based on Michele’s awesome tweets, but I was in no way prepared for the hilarity that ensued – the book literally had me in stitches!” Bookalicious Ramblings

“Single in the City is an easy read that keeps you enthralled…” Female First 

“This is hilarious book, full of romance and laugh-out-loud situations that no woman would want to be in.” Chick Lit Club 

“Gorman has written a great story about making friends and fitting in, and it should be an inspiration to anyone with a hankering to dramatically change their life and/or move here to sunny England. The characters were realistic, the setting familiar and the plot fascinating. Whether you like adult chick lit or YA, Single in the City is definitely a book worth devoting some of your time to.” Wondrous Reads

“If you love chick-lit then you need to read this book. Actually, scratch that… if you enjoy a well written book with a fun and uplifting plot that takes place in England, then you will love Single in the City.” Paperback Dolls

“Single in the City is like Sex and the City told through the eyes of an American Bridget Jones and it was so funny that I laughed out loud throughout this delightful chick lit novel.” Novel Escapes 

“The main character Hannah is the perfect heroine for the book, and I loved seeing London through her eyes. It was a really fun journey and I really did care about her by the end. Recommended!” Chick Lit Reviews

* * * * * 

Single in the City
352 pages
Women’s fiction/Chick Lit
ISBN 9780141048260 (paperback) price £6.99
(ebook) price $3.99/£3.99/€4.49

Michele Gorman is the best-selling author of the Single in the City series and Bella Summer Takes a Chance. She also writes upmarket commercial fiction under the pen name Jamie Scott. Born and raised in the US, Michele has lived in London for 15 years.

Michele Gorman is represented by the Hardman & Swainson Literary Agency (www.hardmanswainson.com). For further information please visit her website: www.michelegorman.co.uk.

Spin by Catherine McKenzie

Book Review
Title: Spin
Author: Catherine McKenzie
Publisher: Harper Weekend
Release: December 20, 2010
Pages: 480 pages
ISBN-10: 1554687594
ISBN-13: 978-1554687596
Stars: 3.5

They tried to make me go to rehab but I said ‘no, no, no’
Yes I’ve been black but when I come back you’ll know know know
I ain’t got the time and if my daddy thinks I’m fine
He’s tried to make me go to rehab but I won’t go go go ~ Amy Winehouse

Celebrities in rehab…Theirs is an age-old, yet timeless tale that allows so many of us to feel better about ourselves when we witness that people who seem to have it all are every bit as screwed up as we are.  Certainly anyone who has watched Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew on VH1 knows this.

Imagine if Bridget Jones fell into a million little pieces, flew over the cuckoo’s nest, and befriended Lindsay Lohan along the way, and you are beginning to grasp the literary roller coaster ride that is Catherine McKenzie’s Spin. Filled with brutal honesty and wry humour, Spin is a story for anyone who has ever woken up hungover and thought, ‘Do I have a problem? Yes–I need to find a greasy breakfast.’ And by that I mean everyone I know.” –Leah McLaren, Globe and Mail columnist, author of The Continuity Girl

At the beginning of the critically acclaimed chick lit novel Spin by Canadian novelist and lawyer, Catherine McKenzie, 30-year-old wannabe music journalist and party girl Kate Sanford’s life is spinning out of control.  She’s a lying alcoholic who doesn’t acknowledge her own flaws until she’s presented with the opportunity to land the job of her dreams writing about music for The Line magazine.  Only there’s one big catch.  In order to prove to its publishers that she’s got the stuff it takes to be successful in a job that so many people want but few can do well, she has to go to rehab and she can’t tell anyone about it.

Katie’s sent undercover to spy on Hollywood “It Girl”, The Girl Next Door television star, Amber Sheppard and expose the truth about her struggles with crack addiction and her toxic, on-again, off-again relationship with the Young James Bond star, a caricature of one of many handsome, insipid, dickhead Hollywood celebrities: Connor Parks.  Predictably, Katie ends up genuinely liking Amber as she gets to know her in rehab, not to mention Connor Parks’ personal assistant, the strong, attractive, ginger-haired, silent type, Henry Slattery.  As convenience would have it, Connor decides to follow Amber into rehab to f**k with her head and can’t go anywhere without Henry.  (Entourage anyone?)  Here’s where the “will they get together, or won’t they?” scenario comes into play.

McKenzie seems to have done her research where the paparazzi, rehab, and AA meetings are concerned, and there is a genuinely touching moment when another young woman in rehab tries to commit suicide.  There is also a lot of humour in this novel and it was fun to read Katie’s music playlist at the back of the book.  I smiled at the references to my favourite band, U2, in the last chapter.  However, there is nothing interesting about the supporting characters including Katie’s geeky roommate Joanne, her Scottish party pal Greer or her anorexic BFF, Rory.  And although its characters may be honest, there is nothing fresh and unique about this story which is why it makes it the perfect fodder for a formulaic romantic comedy.  If I’m honest, I’d tell you that I’d watch that movie too, particularly if it featured a perfect specimen of man beast eye candy (say a young Paul Bettany) as Henry.

Although Spin is comic and poignant, it’s not heart-breaking.  It does explore the question “How far would you go to get what you always wanted?” as well as “How afraid are you to get what you’ve always wanted? (a relevant question in my life), and although Katie has been compared in the press to a 21st century Bridget Jones, she just doesn’t have that charm and je ne sais quoi that made Bridget Jones the character responsible for the billion dollar chick lit industry that we are familiar with today.  Many writers have tried to emulate Ms. Jones, but none of them have done so with major success and Catherine McKenzie hasn’t done it either.  I will give her full kudos for trying and I do admit that I read this book quite quickly and enjoyed every fun-filled minute of it.  But it’s no work of art.  It’s simply a decent read for a weekend at the beach.

Can any chick lit novel really be a work of art?  Writers can create enjoyable, compelling reads in this genre, and I’ve enjoyed many, but ultimately chick lit is the popcorn of literature.

If you want to watch a film that explores the ridiculousness of fame and the vultures that are the paparazzi, check out Tom DiCillo’s Delirious starring Steve Buscemi, Michael Pitt and Alison Lohman.  It won’t take you as long to watch as it will to read Spin.