Live Wire Music Series Presents The Claytones and The Slocan Ramblers on Fri. Jan. 24th

There is a tremendous co-bill coming up soon to kick off the Live Wire Music Series at the Octave Theatre. On Friday, Jan. 24, The Claytones, a great new alt country group from the heart of the OttawaValley, will share the evening with The Slocan Ramblers, a dynamic young Toronto foursome that plays bluegrass and old-time music flawlessly and with an uncommon flair. These two enormously talented groups will give a spectacular show at The Octave!  Remember – you can now buy your tickets online at www.livewiremusicseries.ca.
The Claytones

The Claytones were born a few years ago when Anders Drerup and Kelly Prescott were cast in the acclaimed theatrical production, Grievous Angel -The Legend of Gram Parsons. Anders played the title role and Kelly was Emmy Lou Harris. Their undeniable chemistry led to the formation of The Claytones — together with bass player Adam Puddington, they have been wowing audiences with superb vocal harmonies and impressive instrumental prowess ever since. The National Post named them one of ‘5 Canadian bands to watch for in 2012’. Take a look at this live video to get a taste of what they do:

 

The Slocan Ramblers

The Slocan Ramblers started turning heads in early 2009 while playing casual gigs in the Toronto ‘roots music’ scene. Their weekly local pub gigs became a staple of the city’s thriving acoustic music activity. The Ramblers quickly earned a reputation across Canada for energetic live performances, impressive musicianship and uncanny ability to convert anyone in their path into a fan. The Slocan Ramblers have moved far beyond their pub origins.  Career highlights include standing ovations at the legendary Mariposa Folk Festival, opening for Steve Martin on the main stage at Toronto Jazz Fest, and a popular West Coast tour last summer.  The intensity and drive forged in their early bar-room gigs continue to set them apart — they are outstanding!  Check out the Ramblers live in the two songs in this video:


Live Wire Music Series presents
The Claytones and The Slocan Ramblers
Friday, Jan. 24, 7:30 pm
Octave Theatre, 711 Dalton Ave, Kingston (Sir John A. Macdonald Blvd. & the 401)

$20 in advance and $25 at the door — available now at Brian’s Record Option, Tara Foods or online at www.livewiremusicseries.ca

 The Claytones give what so many other groups only promise.  Exquisite, classic, country-soaked harmonies.  Originals that stand proudly beside the classic songs they cover with conviction.  A stage presence that marks them as serious professionals — The Claytones deliver!

James Keelaghan,  Artistic Director, Georgian Bay Folk Society

The Slocan Ramblers put on one of the most vibrant shows of acoustic music I’ve seen in some time. It’s rare for Canadians (especially young Canadians) to play this music with such authority, passion and yet ability for experimentation. Chops galore…and a handsome bunch of fellas.

Tom Power, Host of CBC’s Deep Roots, and Radio 2 Morning

 

Life by Keith Richards

Book Review
Title: Life
Author:  Keith Richards (with James Fox)
Publisher: Little, Brown & Company
Released: 2010
Pages: 576
ISBN-10: 031603438X
ISBN-13: 978-0316034388
Stars:  4.0

On the inside jacket cover of Keith Richard’s autobiography, Life, it reads in Keith’s handwriting: “This is the Life.  Believe it or not I haven’t forgotten any of it.  Thanks and praises, Keith Richards”.

Well, it seems pretty amazing to me that Keith could remember everything that has happened to him in his extraordinary life, considering I’m 21 years younger and can’t remember everything about my own less than extraordinary life and haven’t consumed a fraction of the drugs that he has!  However, I will say that with his co-writer James Fox’s help, Richards has written a very compelling road trip of a tale of what life has been like for him from the time he was a boy in Dartford, England (he was especially close to his mum, Doris & Aunt Patty and we are privy to some of his letters to her), to his grandfather Gus teaching him his first guitar lick, to the day he met his destiny – and perhaps arch nemesis – in the form of the young Mick Jagger, to the day they formed The Rolling Stones; and later, to the lows of heroin addiction as well as Keith’s joy in being a part of the X-pensive Winos and the Wingless Angels.

The hefty, award-winning (Norman Mailer Prize) tome opens with a recount of Keith’s bust in Arkansas during the 1975 Stones tour with much humour and fond recollection for both foolish choices and dangerous behaviour.  He reviews other busts as well, including one at his English home in Redlands, at Nellcộte in France, and the infamous 1977 Toronto arrest, and doesn’t shy away from talking about his drug consumption, what happened at Altamont in 1969, Stones mythology, or his own, at times, less than flattering behaviour.  If it wasn’t for their powerhouse criminal lawyer, Bill Carter, Richards would have spent a lot more of his rocker days behind bars.  Keith recalls, “The choice always was a tricky one for the authorities who arrested us.  Do you want to lock them up, or have your photograph taken with them and give them a motorcade to see them on their way?”  All laws do not apply to celebrities or really wealthy people and never have.

A lot of what has been written about Keith Richards has been fabricated or twisted by his own careless exclamations and the truth is that he has never had a blood transfusion; he just has a phenomenal constitution.

I can’t untie the threads of how much I played up to the part that was written for me.  I mean the skull ring and the broken tooth and the kohl.  Is it half and half?  I think in a way your persona, your image, as it used to be known, is like a ball and chain.  People think I’m still a goddamn junkie.  It’s thirty years since I gave up the dope!  Image is like a long shadow.  Even when the sun goes down, you can see it.  I think some of it is that there is so much pressure to be that person that you become it, maybe, to a certain point that you can bear.  It’s impossible not to end up being a parody of what you thought you were.

What shines through in Keith’s Life is his absolute, undying passion for music, the legendary musicians who have influenced him throughout his career (Louis Armstrong, Elvis, Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters), his on-again, off-again love affair with The Stones, and his unquestionable love for his family: wife Patti Hansen, son Marlon, daughter Angela (whose mother is Anita Pallenberg) and daughters Alexandra & Theodora with Patti.  He talks a lot about the technical aspects of being a musician and as a non-musician, that wasn’t quite as interesting for me, but I loved reading about his friendships and escapades with other celebs and infamous music figures.

There are some wonderful glossy black & white and colour photos from Richards’ archives in two sections of the book as well as black & white memories at the beginning of each chapter with a synopsis of the main events covered in the chapter which makes the book easy to skim through to find what you’re looking for.

I found Keith’s relationships with Gram Parsons and John Lennon (“He was so open.  In anybody else, this could be embarrassing.  But John had this honesty to his eyes that made you go for him.  Had an intensity too.  He was a one-off.  Like me.”) very interesting and poignant, and reliving his relationship with Anita Pallenberg was somewhat akin to a raucous amusement park ride.  Brian Jones seemed to be a walking disaster from the start, but we don’t get to know much about Mick Taylor (except that he was quite moody), Ron Wood or Bill Wyman as Keith is closest to Charlie Watts.  We get a peripheral view of what was going on in the other band member’s lives from time to time, but this is, after all, Keith’s story and if you’re looking for the truth about the Glimmer Twins, you’ll get his side of the story here.  I also noticed that he is a total gentleman when it comes to describing the women in his life and there have been a few (first love Haleema Mohamed, Ronnie Spector, Linda Keith & Uschi Obermaier), and is very loyal to his mates too.

I concluded from reading Keith’s book that Mick Jagger is the cold, pretentious, entitled prick I always thought he was (“Mick doesn’t like to trust anybody.  I’ll trust you until you prove you’re not trustworthy.  And maybe that’s the major difference between us.”) which is why I never really liked him or have considered myself a huge Stones fan even though I always thought that Keith was one, cool, f***ing freak of nature.  It’s quite a miracle really that the band didn’t break up 30 years ago.  Charlie Watts has probably just as much to do with their longevity than anyone else in the band, but Keith is indubitably its heart and soul.  Perhaps because of the fact that for “many years I slept, on average, twice a week,” Keith Richards has done more in his 69 years than most people do if they live to be 120.

I love much of the Stones’ music because they created brilliant songs that are indelibly etched into the soundtrack of my youth (“You Can’t Always Get What You Want”, “Sympathy For The Devil”, “Paint It Black”, “Gimme Shelter”, “Satisfaction”, “Angie”). I regret, sadly, that I’ve never seen them in concert and likely never will.  However, reading Keith Richards’ Life does help to dull the pain and it’s a helluva fun trip too!