Exit The Actress by Priya Parmar

Book Review
Title: Exit The Actress
Author:  Priya Parmar
Publisher: Touchstone
Released: February 1, 2011
Pages: 464
ISBN-10: 9781439171172
ISBN-13: 978-1439171172
Stars:  3.0

Exit The Actress by Priya Parmar is historical romantic fiction set in England between the years 1662 and 1670 during the Restoration reign of King Charles II.  A young orange girl named Ellen Gwyn becomes a celebrated actress known as Nell, who finds herself involved in a succession of relationships with three men, all named Charles.  Her story, which is based in fact, is revealed through a series of journal entries, letters, broadsheets and other historical documents.

According to Wikipedia: “Eleanor “Nell” Gwyn (or Gwynn or Gwynne) (2 February 1650 – 14 November 1687) was a long-time mistress of King Charles II of England.

Called “pretty, witty Nell” by Samuel Pepys, she has been called a living embodiment of the spirit of Restoration England and has come to be considered a folk heroine, with a story echoing the rags-to-royalty tale of Cinderella.

Elizabeth Howe, in The First English Actresses, says she was “the most famous Restoration actress of all time, possessed of an extraordinary comic talent.”

However, it also states that “Gwyn was illiterate her entire life (signing her initials “E.G.” would be the extent of her ability to read or write), adding an extra complication to the memorisation of her lines.”

While those last two “facts” didn’t quite come across, Exit The Actress is an intriguing imaginary account of Ellen’s life right up until the end of the book when a short and disappointing Epilogue rather awkwardly ties up the story.

Other than that, there are two other things that I didn’t care for, the first being how small the regular font is and how hard the secondary scriptwriting font is to read throughout.  The second thing I noticed is that for a poor, barely educated oyster girl of 12 years old (at the beginning of the book), Ellen writes suspiciously beyond her years and this just doesn’t ring true for me.  I concede that women had to grow up fast in the 17th century and were often married off very young, but still…

The story begins in May 1662 in London and King Charles II has just taken Portuguese Infanta, Princess Catherine of Braganza, as his queen.  Exit The Actress is well researched and Parmar paints a gorgeous tableau.  However, in the midst of Ellen’s journal entries we are interrupted by correspondence from different characters within the Royal family, the Royal court, and a mysterious, flamboyant gossip columnist named Ambrose Pink (who immediately reminded me of Perez Hilton) – again printed in a tiny scriptwriting font – and I found this intrusion at first annoying because it broke my connection to Ellen, but eventually got used to it.  Parmar includes a cast list of all the characters in the front of the book so you can go back and refer to it.  The main characters are remarkable and fully realized and I particularly enjoyed Edward “Teddy” Kynaston, Ellen’s cross-dressing and not so closeted homosexual actor friend as well as King Charles himself.

Ellen’s mother is a drunken tavern maid and Madam who pushes her oldest daughter, 14 year old, Rose, into prostitution to help bring in money for the family.  Ellen writes about her life and how the actions of the Royal family influence everyone around her, and when on her 13th birthday she is asked to become an orange seller, she accepts the position gladly as she will smell of oysters no longer.  Not even a year later, the orange girl, falls in with the King’s acting troupe and soon, the lithe, red-haired beauty with tiny feet becomes the darling of theatre society.

It took me a few chapters to get used to the structure of Exit The Actress and the letters from the Royals, but once I did, I enjoyed it more.  The book’s sections are broken down into the different periods of Ellen’s life, starting with London Ellen, then Orange Girl Ellen, Theatrical Ellen, Actress Ellen, Independent Ellen, etc., all the way to section 10 – Exit The Actress.  There is also an Author’s Note, Acknowledgements, a Reading Group Guide, A Conversation with Priya Parmar, and tips on How To Enhance Your Book Club.  It seems that books are now including Special Features, just like DVDs.

Significant historical events included London’s Great Plague of 1665, the Great Fire of London in 1666, and Charles II’s war against the Dutch.  However, I was most fascinated by Lord John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester – the poet that Johnny Depp so brilliantly portrayed in The Libertine – whose considerable role as Ellen’s and King Charles’ friend and confident was revealed.  Whenever he is mentioned, I found myself even more interested in the scene, as he is a colourful and complex character, known as a writer and Wit who constantly battled his demons and eventually allowed alcohol and promiscuity to lead him to an early grave.  He died at age 33 from syphilis.  Rochester’s story is perhaps even more interesting than Ellen’s as her plot line contained very little conflict aside from having to share King Charles with his long line of mistresses.

Overall, Priya Parmar has written a fine although somewhat uneven debut novel but I will look forward to her future work.

Don’t Miss Irish Singer-Songwriter Andy White In Kingston This Friday Night!

Andy White, one of the great Irish singer-songwriters, tours the world with his 12 string guitar in one hand and a book of poetry in the other. He has worked with the likes of Peter Gabriel, Sinead O’Connor, Van Morrison and Neil and Tim Finn, been musical director at WOMAD UK and won Ireland’s top songwriting awards.

Since his breakthrough single ‘Religious Persuasion’, Andy has produced ten internationally acclaimed albums, the latest of which, Songwriter (Wildflower Records) is widely acknowledged as one of his finest.

Songwriter has many Canadian connections. After working with Po’ Girl in the UK, Andy wrote a series of songs with lead singer Allison Russell including the first single off the album, the duet ‘If You Want It’.

Andy then called up old chum Stephen Fearing to co-write live favourite ‘Turn Up The Temperature’, an emotional highlight of the album Faithful Heart.

Stephen and Andy met at the Winnipeg Folk Festival in 1998 and have co-written a series of songs for Blackie and the Rodeo Kings including ‘If I Catch You Crying’.

Songwriter was recorded in Vancouver and features Allison Russell on vocals, Paul Rigby (Neko Case/Jakob Dylan) playing electric guitar and pedal steel, and John Raham (Be Good Tanyas/Frazey Ford) on drums. It’s a new rootsier direction for the Belfast songsmith.

As well as releasing albums, Andy is a published poet and writer. His latest book is 21st Century Troubadour (Lagan Press), an On The Road style narrative.

People are fascinated by the world of rock music, and 21st Century Troubadour was written in its hidden corners — backstage, hotel rooms and departure lounges. The reader is introduced to depressive promoters, crazed club owners and diva superstars. There are lists, poems, and advice on topics such as how to how to avoid excess baggage fees, which hand signals to employ when driving in Italy, and what to do when you’re mistaken as one of U2.

You’ll not only find out why Johnny Depp bought Andy a beer at Peter Gabriel’s place, but enter a whole different world of glamour in Andy’s life as a modern-day folk singer.

In concert he’ll be featuring songs from his back catalogue, including Irish classics ‘James Joyce’s Grave’ and ‘Street Scenes From My Heart’ as well as songs co-written with Stephen Fearing for Blackie and the Rodeo Kings, and selections from Songwriter.”

“I love this man and his music. Rave on!” (Janice Long, BBC Radio 2).

www.andywhite.com

Andy White opens for the legendary Judy Collins at Sydenham Street United Church on Friday, April 22, 2011.

Venue: Sydenham Street United Church, 82 Sydenham Street, Kingston, ON K7L 3H4
Tickets: $35 plus HST
Available at the Grand Theatre Box Office
613-530-2050
www.kingstongrand.ca

and at:

Brian’s Record Option
381 Princess Street, Kingston, ON
613-542-2452

Find Andy White on his:

Official website
Blog
MySpace
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube

Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts: The Best Book I’ve Ever Read

Book Review
Title: Shantaram
Author: Gregory David Roberts
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin
Released: 2003
Pages: 944
ISBN-10: 0312330529
ISBN-13: 978-0312330521
Stars: 6.0

The sensational epic novel Shantaram by Australian author Gregory David Roberts is one that I don’t think I will ever forget for as long as I live. It is the best book I have ever read and giving it 5 stars just isn’t enough to express how much I loved it and what a profound effect its author has had on the way I look at the world.

This is a book I savored like a last bottle of water in the desert, while reading several others in between over a period of five months, because I never wanted it to end. Its gripping, visceral descriptions of prison life will make you squirm in your seat and its heartrending passages about the loss of loved ones will have you weeping uncontrollably, but it will also make you daydream, smile, and laugh out loud.

The theme of Shantaram is the exile experience, alienation, and man’s quest for meaning. It’s also about shame and self-loathing, sadness and hope, fear and forgiveness, poverty and true wealth, understanding and catharsis. And above all, it is about love.

Shantaram (which is actually the second book in a trilogy that has not yet been published) for the most part takes place in Bombay (Mumbai) and the author’s knowledge and love for the Indian people is so intoxicating and infectious that it will make you want to visit India with the hope that you will come to know its people in the same way. He describes the sights, sounds, smells, tastes and feel of India (as well as his romantic retreat in Goa and the war torn and ravaged Afghanistan) with as much perfect detail, love and care as a famous artist put into his masterpiece with each strategic brush stroke.

Shantaram is the story of the indomitable spirit of a man who has lost everything – whose will to survive is astonishing – and the lengths to which he will fight to climb out of the abyss, absolutely astounding. The main character who has a number of names: Linbaba, Lin, Shantaram…is a man who feels damned and beyond redemption because of the crimes he’s committed (robbery, smuggling, gunrunning, counterfeiting, and working as a street soldier for the Bombay mafia) but who manages to find light, peace and salvation through the relationships he shares with the people he loves.

“It’s forgiveness that makes us what we are. Without forgiveness, our species would’ve annihilated itself in endless retributions. Without forgiveness, there would be no history. Without that hope, there would be no art, for every work of art is in some way an act of forgiveness. Without that dream, there would be no love, for every act of love is in some way a promise to forget. We live on because we can love, and we love because we can forgive.”

Based on many of the true life experiences of Gregory David Roberts – who after the failure of his marriage in Australia became a heroin addict, robber, inmate, escapee, and finally a refugee hiding out in India – Shantaram is stellar fiction that will leave you with many questions about how much of the story actually happened and how much was devised by Roberts’ literary genius. You may also find yourself falling in love with its author because of his intellect, charisma, and the sheer magnitude of his gigantic heart.

This book should be required reading for every college and university student on the planet. It’s a story that should be read, if possible, before embarking on the major part of your life’s journey. It is filled with so many exquisitely written passages and profound and remarkable quotes that you will be able to find something in it to express almost every situation you could possibly encounter.

“Everything you ever sense, in touch or taste or sight or even thought, has an effect on you that’s greater than zero. Some things, like the background sound of a bird chirping as it passes your house in the evening, or a flower glimpsed out of the corner of an eye, have such an infinitesimally small effect that you can’t detect them. Some things, like triumph and heartbreak, and some images, like the image of yourself reflected in the eyes of a man you’ve just stabbed, attach themselves to the secret gallery and they change your life forever.”

The characters, particularly his closest friends outside of the mafia council, such as Prabaker, Johnny Cigar, Qasim Ali Hussein and the slum dwellers, and the European crowd from Leopold’s Bar: Karla, Lisa, Didier, Ulla and Modena, Maurizio, Lettie and Vikram, Scorpio George and Gemini George, as well as Abdullah, Khader Khan and the other members of the Bombay mafia, are richly developed and fully realized and as a reader you become invested in them as you experience their joys and tragedies. I believe that some of these characters were amalgamations of several different people who Roberts knew in India in the 80s, but the world he creates through their eyes is as complex and colourful as the one we live in at this moment. Rarely, have I read a book that so completely transported me into the author’s world and seldom have I thought of one so much after I’d put the book down.

As I read the last few pages of this giant tome, tears trickled down my face, because of what Roberts had written in ending this part of his tale, and because I had come to the end and now I have to wait for the sequel to be published; hopefully in September 2011. Having a writer’s work that is this good, to look forward to, is something exceptional indeed. Gregory David Roberts’ life has been beyond extraordinary.

I won’t say anything more but READ THIS BOOK. You can also read an essay, The Architecture of the Novel on Roberts’ website at www.shantaram.com under the Author Notes tab.

Here is Gregory David Roberts talking about Shantaram and his experiences in India for CNN’s Talk Asia:

PART 1

PART 2

PART 3

PART 4

NOTE:

Johnny Depp bought the rights to this book for the making of the movie but the project has been stalled in development for quite a long time and there is no telling when production will begin.

When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors


DVD Review
Title: When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors
Director: Tom DiCillo
Studio: Eagle Rock Entertainment
Starring: Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek & John Densmore; narrated by Johnny Depp
Run Time: 90 min.
Release Date: June 29, 2010
Stars: 4.0

As the imperturbable narrator Johnny Depp has already said, “As a rock n’ roll documentary, or any kind of documentary for that matter, it simply doesn’t get any better than this.”

The mesmerizing When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors, written and directed by Tom DiCillo, opened in North America on April 9th of this year and I attended the premiere that evening in Kingston. The theatre screening was two-thirds full with an audience of mixed demographics and everyone sat still with rapt attention and watched for the most part in sober silence for 90 minutes. There were a few laughs along the way, usually at Jim’s expense. The DVD viewing experience allows you to truly indulge in your emotional response to it, out loud. For Doors fans, it is the ultimate film treasure.

The opening sequence of When You’re Strange is riveting, with Jim Morrison climbing out of a crashed car on a desert highway in never-before-seen footage from his and Paul Ferrara’s 50-minute 1969 film HWY, that is so clear and vibrant that it could have been shot yesterday. As Jim drives along a California highway in a slick, blue Shelby GT500 we hear reports of his death on the car radio and so begins a factual and retrospective look back at one of the most unique and influential rock bands ever to grace this planet. With Johnny Depp at the helm, we’re taken for a sail back through time to an era when counterculture was born and a gorgeous, young, Elvis-obsessed, and very well read James Douglas Morrison was quoting William Blake. “If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite”.

Jim also knowingly said, “The music can’t help but reflect things that are happening around it.” That is still true of music today although no other band has so clearly defined an era in history as perfectly as The Doors depicted the end of the 1960s and the end of the Kennedys’ Camelot vision for America. Tom DiCillo has captured this fact perfectly in his commanding film about Robby Krieger, John Densmore, Ray Manzarek and Jim Morrison and he made sure to emphasize the importance of each band member’s contribution. Presented primarily in chronological order from archival footage supplied by Wolf Films and producer Peter Jankowski, When You’re Strange is not only a bittersweet love letter to the band, but a Dear John letter to the era that spawned them.

“The fact is the music is strange. It is music for the different, for the uninvited. It carries the listener into the shadowy realm of dream.”

The film’s editing is superb and perfectly paced with Depp’s narration while the sequence with “Riders On The Storm” playing during graphic footage of the Vietnam War is particularly powerful. When You’re Strange covers all the well known seminal moments in the career of The Doors as well as some private ones among the band members which offer a more well-rounded depiction of their relationship. It reveals the fact that even before the infamous Miami concert the cops were really hard on Morrison and denied him his constitutional right to freedom of speech. It was DiCillo’s position to simply allow their story to unfold as it happened within the contexts of the footage he had to work with and the major news events of the time period (1965-1971) and he let the material speak for itself.

You will thoroughly enjoy the footage that you haven’t seen before while being reminded of the band’s relevance in the history of rock’n’roll. When You’re Strange can’t help but stir up emotions for anyone who lived through the time period it represents but it also gives new fans the big picture as to why The Doors music is timeless and why it continues to live on long past the lives of the men who dared to challenge the boundaries of rock music with intelligent, poetic lyrics and jazz, flamenco, classical and blues infused rock’n’roll. No one had done it before and no one has made music like it since.

The one DVD bonus feature is an interview with Jim’s father Admiral George S. Morrison (who admitted that he was a very poor interpreter of Jim’s talent and didn’t know him very well after he left home) and his sister Anne Robin Morrison-Chewning who share their fond memories of Jim.

When You’re Strange was nominated for a Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival in 2009, aired on PBS’ American Masters program on May 26, 2010 and has gone on to earn an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Achievement in a Non-Fiction Series. It continues to do well in Europe and will undoubtedly make Top 10 Best Rock Documentary lists all over the world.

When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors

Movie Review
Title: When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors
Director: Tom DiCillo
Studio: Rhino Entertainment
Starring: Jim Morrison, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek & John Densmore; narrated by Johnny Depp
Run Time: 90 min.
Release Date: April 9, 2010
Stars: 4.0

As the imperturbable narrator Johnny Depp has already said, “As a rock n’ roll documentary, or any kind of documentary for that matter, it simply doesn’t get any better than this.” I concur.

I went to see the new, mesmerizing rock documentary When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors, written and directed by Tom DiCillo tonight with friends, my niece and her boyfriend (20 & 19 respectively) and I was disappointed that there wasn’t more of a buzz going on at the premiere screening in Kingston, hosted by K-ROCK 105.7 radio. The theatre was two-thirds full with an audience of mixed demographics and everyone sat still with rapt attention and watched for the most part in sober silence for the next 90 minutes. There were a few laughs along the way, usually at Jim’s expense, and I caught myself smiling through much of the film. There’s something about being middle-aged and having to be responsible that goes against my inner will to be weird. Watching When You’re Strange made me want to party with my friends and listen to Doors music all night long but reality had something less debaucherous in mind.

When You’re Strange opens with never-before-seen footage of Jim as a drifter in the desert in his friend Paul Ferrara’s 50-minute 1969 film HWY that is so clear and vibrant that it could have been shot yesterday. As he drives along a California highway in a slick, blue Shelby GT500 we hear reports of his death on the car radio and so begins a factual and retrospective look back at one of the most unique and influential rock bands ever to grace this planet. With Johnny Depp at the helm, we’re taken for a sail back through time to an era when counterculture was born and a gorgeous, young, very well read James Douglas Morrison was obsessed with Elvis Presley and could quote William Blake at the same time.

“If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite”.

Jim also knowingly said, “The music can’t help but reflect things that are happening around it.” That is still true of music today although no other band has so clearly defined an era in history as perfectly as The Doors depicted the end of the 1960s and the end of the Kennedys’ Camelot vision for America. Tom DiCillo has captured this fact perfectly in his commanding film about Robby Krieger, John Densmore, Ray Manzarek and Jim Morrison and he made sure to emphasize the importance of each band member’s contribution. Presented primarily in chronological order from archival footage supplied by Wolf Films and producer Peter Jankowski, When You’re Strange is not only a bittersweet love letter to the band, but a Dear John letter to the era that spawned them.

Although I knew much of what was presented about the band already, I still thoroughly enjoyed the footage that I hadn’t seen before and I loved being reminded of the band’s relevance in the history of rock’n’roll. My only complaint is that I wish it was longer because when the music was over, I didn’t want to leave, I didn’t want to turn on the lights, and I didn’t want to stop listening to the band. This is probably why people will want to go to see it over and over again.

“For the music is your special friend
Dance on fire as it intends
Music is your only friend
Until the end
Until the end
Until the end

What have they done to the earth?
What have they done to our fair sister?
Ravaged and plundered and ripped her and bit her
Stuck her with knives in the side of the dawn
And tied her with fences and dragged her down

I hear a very gentle sound
With your ear down to the ground
We want the world and we want it…
We want the world and we want it…
Now!”

~When The Music’s Over~

When You’re Strange can’t help but stir up emotions for anyone who lived through the time period it represents but it also gives new, younger fans the big picture as to why The Doors’ music is timeless and why it will continue to live on long past the lives of the men who dared to challenge the boundaries of rock music with intelligent, poetic lyrics and jazz, flamenco, classical and blues infused rock’n’roll. No one had done it before and no one has made music like it since.

Ray, Robby and Tom talk about When You’re Strange at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival

When You’re Strange: A Film About The Doors by Tom DiCillo

When You're StrangeI don’t normally blog about movies but this particular film is an exception because it’s a documentary about one of my all-time favourite bands, The Doors, narrated by my favourite actor, Johnny Depp. As my good friend Tracie said, (and I concur) “It’s a win win for me!”

We’re going to see the special event screening of Tom DiCillo’s film on Thursday, April 15th, 2010 at 7:00 pm at the Cineplex-Odeon in Kingston. I’m very excited about this because I’ve been a big fan of Jim Morrison and The Doors for as long as I can remember, have read numerous books written about them and by them, and even had the privilege of meeting Ray Manzarek at a book signing in Toronto in 1999 when he was promoting Light My Fire: My Life With Jim Morrison and The Doors.

I am hereby joining The Doors Street Team (you can too!) and am going to pass along their information about When You’re Strange here. From the official website:

Following a prestigious festival run, WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE: A FILM ABOUT THE DOORS will receive a theatrical release in select markets on Friday, April 9. The crowd-pleasing documentary has been featured at the Sundance, Berlin, Deauville and San Sebastian Film Festivals and most recently played to sold-out shows at the Santa Barbara Film Festival.

Produced by Wolf Films/Strange Pictures, in association with Rhino Entertainment, and released by Abramorama, the 90-minute film is the first feature documentary about The Doors.

“They say if you remember the ‘60s you weren’t there,” said producer Dick Wolf. “I can state definitively that one of the things I do remember is buying THE DOORS first album the day it came out and then listening to it about ten or twelve times in a row. Both sides. Every song. I’ve been a fan ever since. This movie is the story of the band but it is also an insight into a moment in time that will never be repeated.”

WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE uncovers historic and previously unseen footage of the illustrious rock quartet and provides new insight into the revolutionary impact of its music and legacy. Directed by award-winning writer/director Tom DiCillo and narrated by Johnny Depp, the film is a riveting account of the band’s history.

Said Depp, “Watching the hypnotic, hitherto unreleased footage of Jim, John, Ray and Robby, I felt like I experienced it all through their eyes. As a rock n’ roll documentary, or any kind of documentary for that matter, it simply doesn’t get any better than this. What an honor to have been involved. I am as proud of this as anything I have ever done.”

The film reveals an intimate perspective on the creative chemistry between drummer John Densmore, guitarist Robby Krieger, keyboardist Ray Manzarek and singer Jim Morrison — four brilliant artists who made The Doors one of America’s most iconic and influential rock bands. Using footage shot between the band’s 1965 formation and Morrison’s 1971 death, WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE follows the band from the corridors of UCLA’s film school, where Manzarek and Morrison met, to the stages of sold-out arenas.

Shortly before the film’s theatrical release, its soundtrack will be available March 30 and features 13-songs chronicling The Doors’ six landmark albums with studio versions of classic tracks mixed with legendary live cuts including performances from The Ed Sullivan Show and The Isle Of Wight Festival.

The film is produced by Wolf Films/Strange Pictures, in association with Rhino Entertainment, and released by Abramorama. Additional credits for WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE include producers Dick Wolf, John Beug, Jeff Jampol, and Peter Jankowski. The film is written and directed by Tom DiCillo (“Johnny Suede,” “Living in Oblivion”). Narrated by Johnny Depp.

The Demon Barber of Fleet Street Comes To Kingston!

Johnny Depp & Helena-Bonham Carter in Tim Burton's Sweeney Todd

PRESS RELEASE

Bottle Tree Productions
Presents

The first performance in Kingston!

SWEENEY TODD

The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

The School edition

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Book by Hugh Wheeler

Directed by Anne Marie Mortensen
Choreography by Chelsea Swain
Stage Manager Judy Roberts

The recent Tim Burton movie starred Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter as the partners in gore. Adam Eliot and Hannah Smith lend their gifted voices to the merchants of mayhem. Anton Kaduck is a revelation as the hanging judge. Megan Ready-Walters and her sweet soprano voice makes her the perfect ingénue. The Gothic church that is The Wellington Street Theatre is the perfect environment for Fleet Street and its sordid neighbourhood. Adam Eliot’s Sweeney Todd arrives back in England after being unjustly sentenced for crimes he did not commit. All he ever loved has been taken from him and he is looking for revenge. He falls in with Hannah Smith’s Mrs. Lovett, and between them they go on a murderous spree, which ultimately consumes them in the fires of hate.

Sweeney Todd has been regarded for years more as urban legend than actual real-life flesh and bones. Cheap sordid novels in the early eighteen hundreds chilled and thrilled English readers. Sweeney Todd was the Freddy Kruger, the zombie horde, the vampire of his time. Some evidence exists to suggest that Mister Todd did himself exist. Sondheim and Wheeler have given Sweeney more noble cause for what he is driven to do, more noble than the avarice and greed accorded him by earlier writers, but in the end the result is the same.

Sondheim’s brilliant, complicated music and Hugh Wheeler’s clever script are complicit in providing a great night’s entertainment.

Show dates:

February 25, 26, 27 – Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are $15 General admission

At The Wellington Street Theatre, 126 Wellington Street, Kingston, Ontario

www.bottletreeinc.com

Phone: 613-542-0070

Grand Theatre Box Office, 218 Princess Street

Phone: 613-530-2050

Box Office open Mondays-Saturdays from 12 noon to 6 p.m.

www.kingstongrand.ca