Fort McMurray’s Rock Band FREEDOM’S NOTE Launches “THE FIGHT” With An Official Video Release Nationwide

In Grateful Appreciation to Firefighters and First Responders
All Proceeds from “THE FIGHT” benefit The Red Cross Alberta Fires Appeal

Freedom's Note

Fort McMurray residents have begun the difficult journey home weeks after that terrifying day in May when an unprecedented inferno, fueled by unusually hot and dry spring weather, caused them to flee and led to the largest evacuation in Alberta’s history. Amongst those returning June 2nd, were rock band Freedom’s Note, but not until they finished recording their most important body of work to date.

THE FIGHT’, written by Donny Synard and Danny Fewer and performed by Donny Synard (lead vocals, rhythm guitar), Danny Fewer (lead guitar, backup vox), Mark Stewart (bass, backup vox) and Trevor Lethbridge (drums),  is an anthem of appreciation to firefighters and first responders that acted with speed and military precision during this devastation. With additional performances by Shane Gaalaas (B’z) and Johnny Gasparic, ‘THE FIGHT’ was recorded, produced, engineered, mixed and mastered by Grammy-nominated Johnny Gasparic at multi-award winning studio, MCC Recording Studio, Calgary.

“We are proud of Donny and Danny writing a fantastic, ‘true experience’ lyric that shall transcend to everybody directly affected by this tragedy and those that watched and felt the emotions for the people’s lives that were so affected,” said Dave Temple of MCC Recording Studio. “Freedom’s Note endured this tragedy, were made to evacuate and like 85,000+ others were homeless. This band lived it, documented it and sang the f* out of it. Johnny and I are honoured to have our studio name on this.”

With video compilation and production by Matthew Jensen of JensenWorks Technology in Kelowna, utmost appreciation and respect for the media and individuals who filmed is acknowledged. The combined visuals are headshaking, heart-wrenching and resonate an underlying sense of hope.

All proceeds from the purchase of ‘THE FIGHT’ will be donated to the Red Cross for the Alberta Fires Appeal. Click here freedomsnote.com/the-fight to purchase.

Fort McMurray Fire Facts:

Population: 125,000; evacuees, more than 88,000. Burned area, 581,695 hectares (1,437,400 acres) as at June 2. Buildings destroyed, 2,400, 665 work camp units. Injuries, 0. Fatalities, 0 (direct) 2 (indirect). Firefighters deployed from Alberta, Ontario and Quebec with international assistance offered from Australia, Israel, Mexico, the Palestinian Authority, Russia, Taiwan and the United States. South Africa sent 301 firefighters at the request of the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre at the end of May. As of June 2nd, $165 million has been raised for Fort McMurray through The Red Cross.

About Freedom’s Note:  

Originally from Newfoundland, and currently based in Fort McMurray, Freedom’s Note have opened for Kim Mitchell, Finger Eleven, Trooper, Simple Plan, Mötley Crüe’s Vince Neil, and Scott Weiland of Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver fame. Responding to the devastation from wildfires that have swept through Fort McMurray, the community of Brooks, AB hosted a fundraising event on May 14th at their Centennial Regional Arena. With overwhelming support from the community, Fort McMurray’s rock band Freedom’s Note, along with other local bands, helped raise over $100,000 in funds and necessity supplies which required three flatbed trucks to transport the donated items to the Canadian Red Cross and distributed to evacuees. Homeless and unsure of what they would return to, Freedom’s Note continue to “work it” in any capacity possible – performing, keeping spirits up, and handing out food items in areas where many evacuated to and creating and recording, ‘THE FIGHT.’

Freedom’s Note will be among some incredible talent performing at The Rivoli on Friday, June 24th with  94.9 The Rock Presents: HOLD THE FORT –

Giving Back to Fort Mac Toronto StyleA Benefit to support The Red Cross Alberta’s Fire Appeal. Find out more here freedomsnote.com/hold-the-fort

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For Information / Media Enquiries:

i see.
Irene Carroll Et Associates
Public and Media Relations

Irene Carroll,
Strategist
t] 416.366.5473
e] irene@iseeassociates.ca

Freedom’s Note Rocks Their Debut Single “All We Know” With An Official Video Release Nationwide January 4, 2016

Freedom's Note Video Press Release Image

Canada’s newest band, FREEDOM’S NOTE, are rocking the scene in 2016 with the release of their first single, “All We Know” (CANCON) from their debut full-length album TRIAL BY FIRE (May 2016). The rock and roll quartet originally from Newfoundland and now based in Fort McMurray (AB), consists of Donny Synard (Rhythm Guitar/Lead Vocals), Trevor Lethbridge (Drums), Danny Fewer (Lead Guitar/Backing Vocals), and Mark Stewart (Bass/Backing Vocals).

FREEDOM’S NOTE takes the listener on a sonic journey of varying energy to many places, through several feelings reminiscent of the rich Rock ‘n’ Roll history of legend before them, with subtle nods in homage to several other genres along the way. Drawing on music influences from Guns ‘N Roses, Queen, Foo Fighters, Nickelback, Shania Twain and Pink, to name only a few, the foursome are steadily growing audiences and continue to awe those they perform for.

Recorded at multi award-winning MCC Recording Studios (Calgary) under the direction of Grammy nominated producer, Johnny Gasparic, Trial By Fire is filled with songs of love, passion, fun and excitement. “All We Know” is supported at radio with tracking and promotions by Linda Dawe of Music Solutions (Sutton, ON). The edgy rock vibe and compelling lyrics are also cleverly captured in a captivating, high energy video. Filmed in cooperation with Ben Brignall at Brignall Equipment Solutions (Fort McMurray), and under the direction of multi award-winning videographer and photographer Barrett Klesko (FadeBack Studios United, St. Albert, AB), the inclusion of Rock 97.9 FM CKYX radio announcer Cubb Carson’s immediate voiceover adds an extra dimension and imagination to “All We Know.”

All We Know” is about carving your own path in life, taking the road less travelled and putting everything on the line no matter what consequences or barriers are put in front of you,” states Donny Synard. “Too many people look for the easiest or safest road in life.  “All We Know” is about seizing each moment and believing that anything is possible. BE INSPIRED.”

FREEDOM’S NOTE (formerly Destranged) have opened for various renowned acts including Simple Plan, Finger Eleven, Trooper, Kim Mitchell, Mother Mother, Mötley Crüe’s Vince Neil, and Scott Weiland of Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver fame. While steadily growing their fan base, Freedom’s Note will expand their performances and showmanship to audiences during their first national tour in the summer of 2016.

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Learn More:

www.freedomsnote.com

Radio Tracking | Promotions:

Linda Dawe
linda@lindadawe.com
905-722-4543
Music Solutions Inc.

Media Interviews | Industry Enquiries:

i see.
Irene Carroll Et Associates
Public and Media Relations

Irene Carroll, Strategist

t] 416.366.5473
e] irene@iseeassociates.ca

 

 

Introducing Freedom’s Note and “ALL WE KNOW”

Intro-Graphic-Iteration-1-At-Radio-December-28

If Rock ‘n’ Roll was fine wine, with Freedom’s Note, what you experience is akin to the finest among them.

Introducing Donny Synard (rhythm guitar, lead vocals), Danny Fewer, (lead guitar, backing vocals), Mark Stewart (bass, backing vocals) and Trevor Lethbridge (drums) — a complex bouquet of sound, consisting of a hint of Alberta hard work blended with authentic Atlantic undertones and a splash of bright Spanish colours. Their explosion of timbral flavour once casked in an obviously well-travelled, battle-tested barrel that has traversed the ages with pure heart and soul at its very core.

Freedom’s Note takes you on a sonic journey of varying energy to many places, through several feelings reminiscent of the rich Rock ‘n’ Roll history of legend before them, with subtle nods in homage to several other genres along the way.

Drawing on music influences from Guns ‘N Roses, Queen, Foo Fighters, Nickelback, Shania Twain and Pink, to name only a few, the foursome steadily grew audiences under the name Destranged and continued to awe those they performed for, with cover songs and top charting hits. In 2012, the integration of original written material was incorporated into their live shows garnering even more massive appeal and success, with the boys from Newfoundland performing in wider Alberta venues and opening for various renowned acts including Simple Plan, Finger Eleven, Trooper, Kim Mitchell, Mother Mother, Mötley Crüe’s Vince Neil, and Scott Weiland of Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver fame.

Their edgy pop/rock vibe and compelling lyrics contributed to the release of a full album of original material launching Destranged from live band status to recording artists in their own right. Realizing a new band name was in order, they unanimously selected the most requested song from that album, and, Freedom’s Note took flight.

Drawing on personal experiences and creating melodies followed closely behind by lyrics, Freedom’s Note debut full-length album Trial By Fire is filled with songs of love, passion, fun and excitement. Recorded at multi award-winning studio, MCC Recording Studios (Calgary) under the direction of Grammy nominated producer, Johnny Gasparic, Freedom’s Note will launch “All We Know, the first single release to radio nationwide (December 28th, 2015) with full video support (January 4th, 2016).

“All We Know” is about carving your own path in life, taking the road less travelled and putting everything on the line no matter what consequences or barriers are put in front of you,” states Donny Synard. “Too many people look for the easiest or safest road in life.  “All We Know” is about seizing each moment and believing that anything is possible. BE INSPIRED!”

Freedom’s Note will expand their performances and showmanship to audiences during their first national tour in the summer of 2016.

Connect with Freedom’s Note:

Website – www.freedomsnote.com
Facebook – www.facebook.com/freedomsnote
Twitter – twitter.com/freedomsnote
Instagram – www.instagram.com/freedomsnote
Soundcloud – www.soundcloud.com/freedomsnote


Booking:
info@freedomsnote.com

PUBLIC & MEDIA RELATIONS | INDUSTRY CONSULTING

Irene Carroll
i.see/Irene Carroll & Associates
irene@iseeassociates.ca | 416.366.5473

RADIO TRACKING | PROMOTIONS

Linda Dawe
Music Solutions Inc.
linda@lindadawe.com | 905.722.4543

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGEMENT | STRATEGIES

Christine Bode
Scully Love Promo
scullylovepromo@gmail.com | 613.531.9549

WEBSITE & GRAPHIC DESIGN

Matthew Jensen
JensenWorks Technology
jensenworks.com | 403.869.7791

 

Blast From The Past: My Afternoon With Ray Manzarek

Welcome to the first edition of BLAST FROM THE PAST or otherwise known on Twitter as #ThrowbackThursday. On March 27, 1999, I got to meet one of my all-time favourite band’s founder, keyboard player and songwriter, the legendary Ray Manzarek of The Doors. Sadly, we lost Ray on May 20, 2013 when he finally broke on through to the Other Side. He joined a legion of music heroes in Rock’n’Roll Heaven but his legacy will never die. (*Note: The following post is Rated R as it contains drug use, explicit sexuality and harsh language.)

BLAST FROM THE PAST

The Coolest Thing: My Afternoon with Ray Manzarek

Ray Manzarek of The Doors

by Christine Bode
April 5, 1999

I have been a big fan of Jim Morrison and The Doors since my early twenties. I’m 35 now. I work as a legal secretary, and lead a pretty straight life. However, if I were to be true to my authentic self, I’d have to say that I am also a poet and a stoner at heart. When Oliver Stone released his film “The Doors” starring Val Kilmer as Jim in 1991 (a controversial fan that many Doors fans didn’t like), it reaffirmed my initial interest and set me on a path to ingesting everything I could get my hands on about Jim Morrison and The Doors. I’ve read “No One Here Gets Out Alive” by Jerry Hopkins and Danny Sugerman, “Wonderland Avenue: Tales of Glamour and Excess” by Danny Sugerman, “Riders On The Storm” by John Densmore, “Strange Days: My Life With and Without Jim Morrison” by Patricia Kenneally-Morrison, and two books of Jim’s poetry, “Wilderness” and “American Night, Volume 1”. I was completely mesmerized by Morrison’s myth and his creative, poetic soul. I still am!

On Saturday, March 27th, 1999, I did the coolest thing! I attended a four hour seminar (minus a one hour lunch break) hosted by Ray Manzarek, founder and former keyboard player for The Doors. My friend Donna had pointed the event out to me in the free magazine from The Learning Annex and I will likely attend many more interesting and exciting seminars, lectures and workshops that are offered by The Learning Annex (as I bought a membership). Right now however, I want to recount the highlights from “Light My Fire: My Life With Jim Morrison and The Doors”.

The seminar was held in the Grande Ballroom East of the Colony Toronto Hotel. I arrived at 10:30 a.m. and had a croissant and an orange juice in the hotel lobby before taking my seat in the auditorium. It was a fairly large room with two crystal chandeliers and an old, faded floral carpet. There were seven rows of chairs and I would guess that at least 50 people attended the seminar. The room housed a large stage and on it sat a long table covered in a white cloth. It was positioned against the wall and held a pitcher of water and a glass. One single, green, upholstered high chair with a brown wood frame sat stage front and centre. There was a stereo off to stage left that played Doors music while everyone was waiting for Manzarek to arrive. There was also a long table positioned at the left hand side of the entrance and on it were copies of Ray’s book “Light My Fire: My Life With The Doors” for sale, as well as many different books on such New Age themes as Shamanism, The Tao of Music, and Zen Enlightenment, among other topics and of course, Doors CDs. I immediately purchased a copy of Ray’s book for $40 and asked the salesperson if he thought Ray would sign it. He said he would if I asked him to! All right! I was SO excited!

Ray Manzarek arrived on time at 11:00 a.m. and I was struck by the fact that he looked much younger than his 60 years and was more handsome that I had expected! He had spiky grey hair and piercing blue eyes, covered by wireless, clear eyeglasses. He stood about 6’ tall and was still quite lanky. He wore baggy black pants with a pale turquoise T-shirt under a dark blue and green plaid shirt that hung loose over his pants. He was very casual, comfortable and pleasant. He spoke in a deep, clear, emphatic voice and I liked him immediately.

He welcomed everyone for coming and started out by talking about what a great city Toronto is and how it is a lot like his hometown, Chicago. He noted that cultural diversity is one of the best things about Toronto and that in particular, it’s great to be able to try all the different kinds of local foods. He said that Toronto has just about everything except for authentic Mexican food. There’s no place like California for that!

Ray referred to himself as “Manzarek” and to Jim Morrison as simply, “Morrison”. He still sounds like a man of the Sixties as he constantly said “Man!” after everything! I couldn’t stop smiling! He told us that The Doors played in Toronto in May or June of 1967. They also appeared on a CBC production of Noel Harrison’s show and played “The End”, but the producers cut out the lyrics “Father, I want to kill you….Mother, I want to fuck you!” Ray said that most obscene words such as fuck and cunt are probably of Celtic origin! I laughed out loud at that one!

Manzarek covered many topics during the first hour and 45 minutes of the seminar and the following are some of the things he told us about as well as some direct quotes:

“Only meth (e.g. methane) heads and speed freaks from the desert of California love Oliver Stone’s movie!” Ray made it clear in no uncertain terms that he absolutely abhors Oliver Stone and his completely inaccurate 1991 movie, “The Doors”.

Ray and Doors producer, Bruce Botnick are going to release a Doors documentary within the next 6 to 8 months with Toronto footage from the show he mentioned earlier. On April 13th, there will be a DVD release of The Doors laser disc that will include Ray, his wife Dorothy and Jim as college students as well as Ray’s student film from UCLA that Jim is in. He exclaimed, “Get yourself a DVD player!” He’s really excited about it!

Ray loves Latin music and congas.

He reminisced about growing up in Chicago in the 1950s and told us that cool guys wore powder blue and rust coloured clothes because they were the hippest colours. “But you still couldn’t get laid because it was the 50’s!” He recalled memories of being at the drive-in with his date and actually touching pubic hair. Everyone in the room was laughing. “Everyone in the 50’s had amazing breasts! Maybe it was the bras!” I sat there thinking, “Oh yeah, sex, drugs and rock’n’roll! I’m with ya, man!” They’d listen to songs like “Rock Around The Clock” and “Rumble On The Dock” and watch five Sal Mineo pictures at the drive-in and just neck and neck and neck. “The 50’s were very HORNY! As soon as it became 1960, it was okay to fuck!” (And now it’s the end of the 90’s and it’s NOT, again!)

Ray left Chicago behind to go to UCLA in California. He met Jim in film school at UCLA and they were both stoners. “Induction”, his student film was about signing up for the army. Ray enlisted to get away and heal his broken heart. He went to New York City and then to Thailand with the army and said “I got stoned for the first time courtesy of the US Army!” He recounted the first time he smoked Thai stick in Thailand. He said that he couldn’t have sex over there because there was a 90% chance of getting VD, so everyone got stoned instead. He got the dope for free from a Thai kid in exchange for cigarettes. The kid gave him a pail full of this wicked weed and he said that was the first time he realized what being stoned really meant! He smoked some Thai stick under the hot sun and got completely body stoned. He couldn’t even move or talk for a whole afternoon! He said his tongue would fall out of his mouth without him even knowing it. I was laughing so hard because I know what he was talking about! He said that “was one of the best experiences I EVER had!” He also said that, “Jim, Ray and Dorothy were stoners.”

He shipped his footlocker, full of pot, home from the Army to his parents’ house in Redondo Beach. He said that when he got home from the Army, Dorothy met him at the airport and they went straight to a hotel and fucked their brains out for three days! All they did was eat and fuck – they didn’t even leave the hotel.” Soon after, they got a place in Venice and he got Dorothy stoned for the first time on the beach.

Ray told us about Josef “Kinky” von Sternberg who taught him directing at UCLA. Josef von Sternberg also made five films with Marlene Dietrich. He was German. He had a dark German soul and did deep, dark, psychological films noir. His films, such as “The Blue Angel” and “Shanghai Express” reflected German romantic decadence. Jim loved Marlene Dietrich! Ray and Jim were also into Kurt Weill and Bertoldt Brecht. Manzarek believes: “The Communists and Fascists first crack down on the artists, musicians and poets!”

Manzarek met John Densmore and Robby Krieger when they got out of the Maharishi’s meditation camp. They were into Transcendental Meditation and so was Ray. He said that Robby Krieger is a great guitar player/songwriter that could pick up chords like nothing. He also wrote the song “Light My Fire”. Ray conspicuously left out any real mention of John Densmore, so I’ll have to read his book to find out why.

Ray said that Jim was a funny guy and good to be with (a fact that Oliver Stone neglected to emphasize). They’d discuss the merits of John Coltrane vs. Sonny Rawlins and things like that. Dorothy had a great job and she supported them. Ray wanted to ask Dorothy to marry him but he didn’t have a nickel.

He talked about his first band, “Rick and The Ravens” and his moniker then was “Screaming Ray Daniels”. Ray was totally into the blues. (I could have married this man, but I was only 3 years old in 1967!) When he and his brother played in that band, they made $15 a night. They played in a wine bar. “Jim loved “Louie Louie”! He could have sworn the word “fuck” was in the song. All the southern guys loved that song. Jim sang that song the first time he got on stage at the wine cooler bar.” “Rick and The Ravens” played at a prom where Sonny and Cher were also on the bill. Jim played “fake guitar” at the gig and got paid $20. That experience got him hooked on performing.

Jim could roll a joint perfectly but he couldn’t splice his 16mm film properly, so his student film at UCLA couldn’t make it through the projector. He had to re-splice it before it could be shown to his class. Jim smoked a big bomber in his student film and then it cuts to an atomic bomb explosion. There was also a part in it with his friend’s girlfriend, a big German girl named Elke who wore a bra, panties and fishnet stockings and stood on top of a TV in a Marlene Dietrich outfit. Ray said that “Oliver Stone turned Jim’s film into some sick anti-Semitic diatribe…into some sort of Nazi diatribe/Aryan supremacy propaganda film!” But, “Morrison was a Native American Shaman – a cross between a cowboy and an Indian.” Jim’s film was “pure poetry”. In Stone’s movie, Jim supposedly quit when his student film was harshly criticized but that wasn’t true at all. Jim graduated in 1965 from film school. Ray has a Masters Degree in film.

Jim planned to go to New York after graduating to make poetic cinema and Ray thought he’d never see him again. However, “40 days and 40 nights later Jim shows up on the beach” when Ray was there smoking a joint and pondering his future. When he saw Jim, he’d gone from 165 lbs. (“soft and doughy”) to 135 lbs. and had long hair. Jim had been dropping acid and writing poetry that summer. That was when Jim recited the words to “Moonlight Drive” to Ray for the first time. Jim didn’t think he could sing, but Ray said “Bob Dylan can’t sing, man! YOU can sing!” That’s when they decided to put a band together as a showcase for Jim’s poetry. The rest as they say, is history.

“We’re all infinite; cosmically one. We’re all the Buddha, all God, all one!” (Reflection on Ray’s LSD trips.) Ray told this great story of his view of the story of Adam & Eve. “Adam blames his old lady for eating the apple! Fucking GUY ate the apple! We’re not Teletubbies, we’re human beings – we are God! Our job is to conquer the fear and greed and to become conscious of the difference between good and evil. We shouldn’t fear death – it’s divine light (i.e. the feeling of being warm and baking in the sun and our soul leaving our body, just heading to the light).” They learned this by taking LSD. Ray doesn’t recommend taking LSD, but thinks that pot and mushrooms – all things organic – are just fine!

One of my favourite quotes from that day was “You’ll never move beyond the message of love.” I really related to Ray because he thinks religion is seriously weird shit and we have to start a new religion. He said that’s what The Doors were about. Jim said their music was primeval. It’s about: “Let’s save Mother Earth!” “YOU ARE THAT!”

Just before we broke for an hour long lunch break, Ray started to talk about how Jim’s alcoholism made him metamorphose into a character he called “Jimbo”. That was the person Oliver Stone chose to present to the world in his movie.

I was just peaking when we broke for lunch. I had brought a joint with me that Stacey had given me the night before and I just had to go and find a discreet place to smoke some of it. I knew I wouldn’t smoke it all because it was killer shit! I was all dressed up in a skirt and jacket with heels and was wearing my glasses and I’m sure that I looked like the last person who would have been sneaking out of that room to go smoke a joint. I walked around the side of the hotel and found a bench under a tree along the walkway that led away from the hotel. I smoked half of the joint and then went to the bar in the hotel lobby and drank two tequila and 7-Ups for my lunch. There was a girl sitting alone at the bar who asked me if she’d seen me upstairs and I said, “Where?” She said “with Ray…” I admitted that I’d been there and she commented on how excellent he was. I agreed but I found it so difficult to carry on a conversation with her because I was very stoned at that point and completely paranoid that I’d say something stupid. So unfortunately, we didn’t say anything else to each other.

I bought a Snickers bar and started eating it on my way back into the auditorium. When I sat down in the chair I’d been sitting in previously, I wrote the following:

I’m so stoned now that I don’t know how I’m going to be able to take more notes when Ray comes back on. We’ve been on a lunch break from 12:50 -1:30 p.m. I bought a large Snickers bar for lunch and just finished eating it. I’m still feeling the peanuts in my teeth as I sit here waiting for Ray to return. This is so fucking cool! I wish Jen were here SO BAD! Oh shit, now I have dry mouth, but I don’t want to get up and walk across the room to get a glass of ice water ‘cause I’m too high.

“Love Her Madly” is playing and I can’t remember when “LA Woman” ended.

Oh no, the yawns are starting and he hasn’t come back yet. God I wish I had a glass of water. Jim Morrison would have approved of my condition at this moment. How bizarre is this? “Hello, I love you, won’t you tell me your name?!”

Wow, this guy is such a performer and storyteller! Ray’s telling us about the highs and lows of LSD trips. Gurus, mantras, meditation, etc…Maharishi’s meditation. He highly recommends it!

Now he’s saying that Oliver Stone is a fascist and a killer! (I felt bad to hear that because I actually really enjoyed his movie, because I thought Val Kilmer gave such an awesome performance as Jim! It was a lot of fun to watch!)

I’m having a hard time getting all this down. It’s a really weird thing that a 60-year-old man can make a living talking about his life…what a character! He’s now talking about how “Light My Fire” came to be. My butt is getting numb and the left side of my neck is pinched. He’s blathering about how the song “Light My Fire” was created and how they knew it was a good, fucking song and it was going to be a hit.

“Jim was living his life like a reprobate until he began to dissipate…” (Ray actually said that!) into an alcoholic when “Jimbo” took over Jim’s body.

At this point, I couldn’t write any more. I just wanted to listen. Ray only talked for about 45 minutes after we came back fromRay Manzarek lunch and then he held a Q & A session, which was great! I asked him, “What do you think of Patricia Kenneally’s book and how much of it is accurate?” He said that he hadn’t read the book but asked me if I had and if so, what did I think of it. I told him that I thought it offered a different perspective on Jim’s character from anything else that I’d read. Ray said that Patricia was in fact in love with Jim and that they’d had an affair, and then went on to mention how the scene that depicted the Wiccan marriage ceremony in Oliver Stone’s movie had made Jim out to be some sort of Satanist. Another guy in the audience piped up that Patricia had a web site that is just bizarre and that she says that Pam was responsible for Jim’s death and that she murdered him with a heroin overdose! Ray seemed genuinely shocked and said, “Man, you know, I just don’t want to know!” He is really only familiar with The Official Doors Web Site at www.thedoors.com and hasn’t seen any of the other ones.

A Greek girl in the audience went on to say that there was an inscription in Greek on Jim’s original headstone in Pere Lachaise cemetery that when translated basically read “Go down to your demons!” She thought it was horrible that someone close to Jim would put such a thing on his headstone, effectively damning him to hell for all eternity. Ray revealed that he believed that it was Jim’s father who did that. Jim hated his father and in fact always said that he had no family and that his parents were dead. Jim’s father was in the Navy and never forgave Jim for what he had become. That was very sad to hear.

There were several more questions answered before Ray told us he was going to sign copies of his book for us. So everyone lined up and waited for their turn to meet Ray. I was trying to think of something really intelligent to ask him, but I was too overwhelmed. I had brought my camera and took a few shots of Ray on stage, but I really wanted to get someone to take a picture of us together, because the guy in front of me did, but he had an idiot-proof, auto focus, auto flash unit and mine was just too damn complicated to explain to anyone in my stoned state. So I didn’t ask. I regret that.

When I got to Ray, he asked to whom should he sign the book. I spelled out my name for him and said, “You are a great speaker and I really enjoyed that. Thank you!” He replied, “Why thank YOU darlin’!” And that was it. We smiled at each other and I walked away…completely lost on Cloud Nine. And what a darlin’ he is! Now I can’t wait to run right out and watch every Marlene Dietrich film I can find and read all the beat poets including Kerouac, Ginsberg and Ferlinghetti. I am currently reading Ray’s book and man, I am SO inspired!

That my friends, was one of the coolest things I’ve ever done!

***************************************************************

Over the years I’ve written about much of my life because I always thought that some day I would write a book. I have kept journals, written poetry, short stories, reviews and more. I thought it’s about time I start to share some of that with you, not only so that you can get to know me better, but also to understand why music and pop culture has always been such a huge part of my life and, because I may never write that book. My best friend Jen and I are always talking about how much we wish there really was a Hot Tub Time Machine we could use to go back to so many of the memorable moments we’ve had in our lives. In lieu of the lack of such an invention to date, we can always choose to revisit a choice Blast From The Past.

Headstones with Special Guests The Glorious Sons at Rogers K-Rock Centre, Sat. Dec. 28th

Headstones Love + Fury TourFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 21, 2013 

HEADSTONES
with Special Guests: The Glorious Sons
Saturday, December 28 th 2013 – 8:00pm
Rogers K-Rock Centre, 1 The Tragically Hip Way, Kingston, ON. 

“This is the second coming of Headstones, where band and fans are a part of a mutual admiration society of which Dillon is proud to be a part of.” – Huffington Post

K-Rock 105.7 proudly presents Headstones, with Special Guests: The Glorious Sons at Rogers K-Rock on Saturday, December 28th for their first hometown concert in a decade!

Hot off their #1 hit single ‘longwaytoneverland’, Headstones are back again. Hugh, Trent, Tim and Dale are following up the worldwide release of their new album ‘Love + Fury’, with a Kingston performance for all of their hometown fans and friends.

Formed in Kingston, Ontario in 1987, Headstones began their early music career performing to anyone who would listen. At the time, artists such as Neil Young and Leonard Cohen were gracing the charts on Canadian radio while American musician Stevie Ray Vaughn was reviving the blues south of the border. Headstones decided to take a much different approach. Carrying a similar attitude to Iggy Pop and Henry Rollins, Hugh Dillon led members Trent Carr, Tim White and Dale Harrison into becoming a band synonymous with the real Canadian road-worn punk, touring their anti-social behaviour across the country to rough and restless fans.

Kingstonians will remember the legendary hometown performances by Headstones, which include appearances at Richardson Stadium, Fort Henry, and ‘A Joe Show”. You definitely don’t want to miss this rare opportunity to see Headstones, live in their hometown, Kingston, Ontario at Rogers K-Rock Centre.

Tickets: $29.50 PL2 Limited reserved seating
$49.50 General Admission & PL1 reserved seating
$99.00 limited VIP Pre party Package with advance entry, Collectable Poster and commemorative laminate.
All tickets plus taxes and s/cs

General public on sale begins, October 25, 2013 9:00 at Ticketmaster.ca and Rogers K-Rock Centre.

For further information, please contact:

Mae Finlay/OTX Events
P: 613 532-5997
Email: mfinlay@otx.ca

Styx Rocks Kingston, Thursday, November 14 at Rogers K-Rock Centre

Styx Rocks KingstonAN EVENING WITH
STYX ROCKS KINGSTON

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14 – 2013 @ ROGERS K-ROCK CENTRE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS – LEGENDARY CANADIAN PROG-ROCK BAND SAGA

STYX – Tommy Shaw, James “JY” Young, Lawrence Gowan, Todd Sucherman, Ricky Phillips and Chuck Panozzo. Spawned from a Chicago basement in the early ‘70s, STYX would eventually transform into the virtual arena rock prototype by the late ’70s and early ’80s, due to a fondness for big rockers and soaring power ballads. Over the course of their 38-year career they’ve released 15 studio albums, 6 best-of compilations and 4 live albums, garnering 8 Top Ten singles. STYX has sold over 30 million albums worldwide. Throughout their illustrious career, they’ve performed more live shows since 1999 than all of the previous years of its career combined. Two Super-Bowl appearances, Pollstar box offi­ce chart-topping tours, two more studio albums and no end in sight, STYX continues to conquer the planet, one venue at a time.

Styx’s music reflected such then-current prog rockers as Emerson, Lake & Palmer and the Moody Blues, as evidenced by such releases as 1972’s self-titled debut, 1973’s Styx II, 1974’s The Serpent Is Rising, and 1975’s Man of Miracles. While the albums (as well as non-stop touring) helped the group build a substantial following locally, Styx failed to break through to the mainstream, until a track originally from their second album, “Lady” started to get substantial airplay in late ’74 on the Chicago radio station WLS-FM. The song was soon issued as a single nationwide, and quickly shot to number six on the singles chart, as Styx II was certified gold. By this time, however, the group had grown disenchanted with their record label, and opted to sign on with A&M for their fifth release overall, 1975’s Equinox (their former label would issue countless compilations over the years, culled from tracks off their early releases). On the eve of the tour in support of the album, original guitarist John Curulewski abruptly left the band, and was replaced by Tommy Shaw. Shaw proved to be the missing piece of the puzzle for Styx, as most of their subsequent releases throughout the late ’70s earned at least platinum certification (1976’s Crystal Ball, 1977’s The Grand Illusion, 1978’s Pieces of Eight, and 1979’s Cornerstone), and spawned such hit singles and classic rock radio standards as “Come Sail Away,” “Renegade,” “Blue Collar Man” and “Fooling Yourself.” The band decided that their first release of the ’80s would be a concept album, 1981’s Paradise Theater, which was loosely based on the rise and fall of a once-beautiful theater (which was supposedly used as a metaphor for the state of the U.S. at the time — the Iranian hostage situation, the Cold War, Reagan, etc.). Paradise Theater became Styx’s biggest hit of their career (selling over three million copies in a three-year period), as they became one of the U.S. top rock acts due to such big hit singles as “Too Much Time on My Hands.” It also marked the first time in history that a band released four consecutive triple-platinum albums. A career-encompassing live album, Caught in the Act, was issued in 1984, before Styx went on hiatus, and the majority of its members pursued solo projects throughout the remainder of the decade. A re-recording of their early hit, “Lady” (titled “Lady” ’95”), for a Greatest Hits compilation, finally united Shaw with his former Styx bandmates, which led to a full-on reunion tour in 1996. But drummer John Panozzo fell seriously ill at the time (due to a long struggle with alcoholism), which prevented him from joining the proceedings — as he passed away in July of the same year. Although grief-stricken, Styx persevered with new drummer Todd Sucherman taking the place of Panozzo, as the Styx reunion tour became a surprise sold-out success, resulting in the release of a live album/video, 1997’s Return to Paradise, while a whole new generation of rock fans were introduced to the grandiose sounds of Styx via a humorous car ad which used the track “Mr. Roboto,” as well as songs used in such TV shows as South Park and Freaks & Geeks.

SAGA is a rock quintet, formed in Oakville, Ontario. Jim Crichton and Welsh-born vocalist Michael Sadler have been the principal songwriters for Saga. Ian Crichton is the band’s guitarist; apart from his work with Saga, he has recorded several solo albums as well as sessions with Asia. The band’s keyboardist, Jim “Daryl” Gilmour, joined Saga in December 1979. With over 20 albums they are truly one of Canada’s rock treasures. Saga has been awarded gold and platinum albums worldwide and has sold more than 8 million albums.

TICKET AVAILABLE STARTING AT $29.50, $49.50 and $75.00

Tickets can be purchased online at www.k-rockcentre.com or in-person at Rogers K-Rock Centre Box O­ffice.

LIMITED QUANTITIES! SAGA VIP ‘TEAR DOWN’ MEET & GREET PARTY PACKAGES 

Includes awesome seats for the concert, after-party reception with SAGA, Concert poster, MC, Prizes and BIG CAKE.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Mae Finlay
OTX Events.com
mfinlay@otx.ca
613.532.5997

www.styxworld.com
www.sagaontour.ca
www.k-rockcentre.com
www.otxevents.com
www.ambassadorhotel.com

Bob Geldof: Still Making Music & Better Than Ever At Age 61!

This review is a little late in coming as I saw Bob Geldof in concert last Tuesday night at The Empire Theatre in Belleville with four of my closest girlfriends, but the sheer enthusiasm and joy I felt after witnessing my 5th Geldof concert has not waned one iota!  So I must tell you about it!

I’ve been a fan of Sir Bob’s for over 30 years and have had the pleasure of making some pretty wonderful online friendships (most notably with Julie Koretz, administrator of the Bob Geldof Fans Facebook page who I have been friends with for 10 years) because of a mutual appreciation for the man and his music.  The former leader of Irish punk rockers The Boomtown Rats (1977-1986) is better known for his humanitarian and business endeavours than he is for his music, but make no mistake, this man puts on one of the THE BEST rock shows you are ever likely to see!  I’ve seen some pretty impressive bands including U2, Bruce Springsteen & The E-Street Band, The Clash, David Bowie,  Elton John, Roxy Music, Iggy Pop, The White Stripes, Lenny Kravitz and Matchbox Twenty to name a few, but no one, except for U2 & Springsteen can hold a candle to a live Geldof performance.

In the days leading up to Geldof’s performance in Belleville, Ontario he and

Bob with Jim Barber

the band played shows in Hamilton, St. Catharines, Oshawa and Ottawa.  Bob was interviewed by everyone from the CBC to The Napanee Guide’s Jim Barber (a personal friend of mine) and I got more and more excited about seeing him again.

On the night of his Belleville show, I was reminded that Geldof’s band is absolutely superb!  Guitarist Johnny Turnbull, bassist Pete Briquette (The Boomtown Rats), keyboard player & accordionist Alan Dunn, drummer Jim Russell, percussionist Niall Power and violinist Vince Lovepump (aka Bob Loveday) are as tight and professional a group of rockers as any of the artists I listed above. Not only are they each talented players, but they are so comfortable with each other and with letting Bob have all the limelight that they should be commended for standing by him for so many years.  Niall Power

Turnbull & Briquette

was quoted in an Irish newspaper article last year as saying, “Just let’s say that he doesn’t suffer fools gladly,’ Niall laughs. ‘We’re still friends after all these years so I must be doing something right.”

Then there’s Bob himself.  His unmistakable voice is still as strong and fierce as ever and can be equally soft and tender when the song calls for it.  He never stops moving on stage, sometimes padding back and forth like a caged tiger, arms waving in the air to express emotion in a song or while simply dancing back and forth on the spot like a whiskey-soaked gypsy.  As most people would assume, the verbose Geldof is a master storyteller and his rapport with the audience is second to none.  Whether he’s retelling the story of the inspiration for the song “Scream in Vain” and about how sweet potatoes/yams could feed a whole village in Africa or complaining about his hotel in Belleville being at some crossroads on the edge of town where there’s nothing but a Dollarama, he holds an engrossed audience in the palm of his hands.  He’s not above telling you to fuck off either (he told me to fuck off when I complimented Briquette in his presence after the show…but he said it with affection!) but when he smiles or laughs and those dimples are flashed, women are still melting in his 61-year-old presence.

And I can’t forget to mention the singularly charming anomaly that is Vince Lovepump.  He’s a premier violin and mandolin player but you tend to forget about the notes he’s plucking from the strings because you’re fixated on the crazy, mesh wife-beater shirts that he’s so fond of wearing.  His appearance in Geldof’s joyful trampoline jumping video for “Silly Pretty Thing” makes my BFF Jen & I laugh every time.  In it, Vince and Bob run through a wheat field propelling their arms like airplane wings before Bob jumps on the trampoline to show off his acrobatic prowess while Vince plays the violin beside him, wearing a white mesh wife-beater

Vince Lovepump

with a big stain on it.  It’s hilarious!  (Vince is a benign Ray Winstone.)  And on Tuesday night, Vince’s shirt had a hole in it.  Jen & I are seriously thinking about taking up a collection for him to buy him some new shirts!

Bob’s released 7+ albums with The Boomtown Rats and 5 solo albums since 1977, the latest being 2011’s How To Compose Popular Songs That Will Sellthe ironic title of which is not lost on him.  On Tuesday night he performed selections from the Rats discography (“Banana Republic”, “Joey’s On The Street Again”, “Mary of the Fourth Form” and the classic “I Don’t Like Mondays”) and his solo repertoire – mainly from his last two albums – (“One For Me”, “Scream in Vain”, “Mudslide”, “Systematic Six Pack”, “Silly Pretty Thing”, “Dazzled By You”, “Mary Says” among others) opening and closing the show with “The Great Song of Indifference”, one of my all-time favourites.

I kept turning to look at my friends to see if they were enjoying themselves

L-R: Tracie, Nicole, Jen & Kelly

as much as I was and they were!  Only Jen had seen Bob before and knew what to expect, but Tracie, Nicole & Kelly were blown away by how fantastic the concert was.  They were all grinning from ear to ear.  I wanted to dance throughout the whole show.  As it turned out, I joined the crowd at the edge of the stage for the encore and danced at that point, beaming with rapture, and laughing at a middle-aged man who was in Geldof’s words “going apeshit” while pounding the stage to get his attention.  He wanted Bob to sing a song for his brother who was celebrating his birthday and Bob obliged with the beautiful “Mary Says”.

After the encore (several standing ovations were given to the band during the evening), the die-hard fans waited around for Bob to come back out to the front of the stage to sign autographs and pose for photos, which he does so graciously, and I’m quite sure he has a lot of fun doing it.  It’s hard to not want to have more than 30 seconds or so to talk to the man, but he always makes his time with you memorable.  Tracie asked him to sign her ticket so that it would say Happy Birthday to her as she’d just celebrated her 47th birthday.  Bob was gobsmacked at the fact that she was that old (with a 20-year-old daughter) because she doesn’t look a day over 30 and told her that he didn’t believe she was 47.  Needless to say, she’ll never forget that!

I was waiting in line to get Bob to sign a copy of his Live Target CD that I’d purchased from his tour manager Willo earlier in the evening, and saw Pete on the stage.  As he’s a Facebook friend, I called out to him and introduced myself, saying that I was Christine from Facebook, and Bob turned around and said “You’re Christine!” as I believe he realized that I’m one of the administrators of his Facebook fan page, along with Julie (Jules) and Irene Clayton.  I said, “Yes, I am,” and asked Pete to sign my CD.  So he laid down on the stage and Kelly suggested that his pose would make for a great photo and I replied, “You’re right!  Pete does look good!”  And that’s when

Pete signs my CD!

Bob told me to fuck off.

Bob & Jen had a conversation about Facebook and he said that if she was his friend on Facebook that he’d delete her and that in fact, he’d have a great time deleting people on Facebook!  He is gleeful when “taking the piss out of” someone.

When it was my turn to talk to Bob, he asked me when the last time was that I’d seen them play and I told him that it was in 2003 in Dublin at Vicar Street (he declared his love for the venue) and that I’d seen him in Quebec City the same year and that Jen & I had met him at the Palais Royale in Toronto in 2002.  So Bob replied with, “So you’re like stalkers then!”  I’m telling you, you haven’t lived until Bob Geldof tells you to fuck off and calls you a stalker!  Seriously Bob, I only get to see you every 10 years so that’s hardly grounds for being one!

We all had such a great time that it was hard to leave but it’s only fair to let all the fans who were waiting have their time with Bob and Pete told me that they might just come back to Canada next year to play some more shows.  We can only hope!

If you ever get the chance to see Bob Geldof live in concert, DON’T MISS IT!!! He will undoubtedly exceed your expectations in every way.

Life by Keith Richards

Book Review
Title: Life
Author:  Keith Richards (with James Fox)
Publisher: Little, Brown & Company
Released: 2010
Pages: 576
ISBN-10: 031603438X
ISBN-13: 978-0316034388
Stars:  4.0

On the inside jacket cover of Keith Richard’s autobiography, Life, it reads in Keith’s handwriting: “This is the Life.  Believe it or not I haven’t forgotten any of it.  Thanks and praises, Keith Richards”.

Well, it seems pretty amazing to me that Keith could remember everything that has happened to him in his extraordinary life, considering I’m 21 years younger and can’t remember everything about my own less than extraordinary life and haven’t consumed a fraction of the drugs that he has!  However, I will say that with his co-writer James Fox’s help, Richards has written a very compelling road trip of a tale of what life has been like for him from the time he was a boy in Dartford, England (he was especially close to his mum, Doris & Aunt Patty and we are privy to some of his letters to her), to his grandfather Gus teaching him his first guitar lick, to the day he met his destiny – and perhaps arch nemesis – in the form of the young Mick Jagger, to the day they formed The Rolling Stones; and later, to the lows of heroin addiction as well as Keith’s joy in being a part of the X-pensive Winos and the Wingless Angels.

The hefty, award-winning (Norman Mailer Prize) tome opens with a recount of Keith’s bust in Arkansas during the 1975 Stones tour with much humour and fond recollection for both foolish choices and dangerous behaviour.  He reviews other busts as well, including one at his English home in Redlands, at Nellcộte in France, and the infamous 1977 Toronto arrest, and doesn’t shy away from talking about his drug consumption, what happened at Altamont in 1969, Stones mythology, or his own, at times, less than flattering behaviour.  If it wasn’t for their powerhouse criminal lawyer, Bill Carter, Richards would have spent a lot more of his rocker days behind bars.  Keith recalls, “The choice always was a tricky one for the authorities who arrested us.  Do you want to lock them up, or have your photograph taken with them and give them a motorcade to see them on their way?”  All laws do not apply to celebrities or really wealthy people and never have.

A lot of what has been written about Keith Richards has been fabricated or twisted by his own careless exclamations and the truth is that he has never had a blood transfusion; he just has a phenomenal constitution.

I can’t untie the threads of how much I played up to the part that was written for me.  I mean the skull ring and the broken tooth and the kohl.  Is it half and half?  I think in a way your persona, your image, as it used to be known, is like a ball and chain.  People think I’m still a goddamn junkie.  It’s thirty years since I gave up the dope!  Image is like a long shadow.  Even when the sun goes down, you can see it.  I think some of it is that there is so much pressure to be that person that you become it, maybe, to a certain point that you can bear.  It’s impossible not to end up being a parody of what you thought you were.

What shines through in Keith’s Life is his absolute, undying passion for music, the legendary musicians who have influenced him throughout his career (Louis Armstrong, Elvis, Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters), his on-again, off-again love affair with The Stones, and his unquestionable love for his family: wife Patti Hansen, son Marlon, daughter Angela (whose mother is Anita Pallenberg) and daughters Alexandra & Theodora with Patti.  He talks a lot about the technical aspects of being a musician and as a non-musician, that wasn’t quite as interesting for me, but I loved reading about his friendships and escapades with other celebs and infamous music figures.

There are some wonderful glossy black & white and colour photos from Richards’ archives in two sections of the book as well as black & white memories at the beginning of each chapter with a synopsis of the main events covered in the chapter which makes the book easy to skim through to find what you’re looking for.

I found Keith’s relationships with Gram Parsons and John Lennon (“He was so open.  In anybody else, this could be embarrassing.  But John had this honesty to his eyes that made you go for him.  Had an intensity too.  He was a one-off.  Like me.”) very interesting and poignant, and reliving his relationship with Anita Pallenberg was somewhat akin to a raucous amusement park ride.  Brian Jones seemed to be a walking disaster from the start, but we don’t get to know much about Mick Taylor (except that he was quite moody), Ron Wood or Bill Wyman as Keith is closest to Charlie Watts.  We get a peripheral view of what was going on in the other band member’s lives from time to time, but this is, after all, Keith’s story and if you’re looking for the truth about the Glimmer Twins, you’ll get his side of the story here.  I also noticed that he is a total gentleman when it comes to describing the women in his life and there have been a few (first love Haleema Mohamed, Ronnie Spector, Linda Keith & Uschi Obermaier), and is very loyal to his mates too.

I concluded from reading Keith’s book that Mick Jagger is the cold, pretentious, entitled prick I always thought he was (“Mick doesn’t like to trust anybody.  I’ll trust you until you prove you’re not trustworthy.  And maybe that’s the major difference between us.”) which is why I never really liked him or have considered myself a huge Stones fan even though I always thought that Keith was one, cool, f***ing freak of nature.  It’s quite a miracle really that the band didn’t break up 30 years ago.  Charlie Watts has probably just as much to do with their longevity than anyone else in the band, but Keith is indubitably its heart and soul.  Perhaps because of the fact that for “many years I slept, on average, twice a week,” Keith Richards has done more in his 69 years than most people do if they live to be 120.

I love much of the Stones’ music because they created brilliant songs that are indelibly etched into the soundtrack of my youth (“You Can’t Always Get What You Want”, “Sympathy For The Devil”, “Paint It Black”, “Gimme Shelter”, “Satisfaction”, “Angie”). I regret, sadly, that I’ve never seen them in concert and likely never will.  However, reading Keith Richards’ Life does help to dull the pain and it’s a helluva fun trip too!