Boris Glikman – Underground Australian Celebrity With A Mind Like A Planet

Boris Glikman image(NOTE: This article was updated on May 24, 2016)

I’ve posted several quirky short stories by Australian writer Boris Glikman this year on my blog including The mePhone, The Day Death Died, America In The Sky (In Memoriam)and The Substitute SunNow I want to share with you an article about Boris that was published by Fantastic Books Publishing who recently welcomed Boris to their family.

Boris Glikman is an incredible guy. He’s smart, talented and is a prolific producer of poetry and short stories. He’d need about ten blogs to cram in all his achievements so here’s the edited version, we’ve done our best…

Boris is a writer, poet and philosopher from Melbourne, Australia.  The biggest influences on his writing are dreams, Kafka, Borges and Dali. His stories, poems and non-fiction articles have been published in various e-zines and print publications. Boris has appeared a number of times on the radio, including Australian national radio, performing his poems and stories and discussing the meaning of his work. In 2008 his short story – The Clearness and the Impenetrability – was nominated for the prestigious Pushcart Prize.

Among his many talents, Boris is a mathematician and physicist of great prowess and has several mathematical proofs to his name. His network is one of pure creative talent and it’s a real pleasure to welcome him and his friends to the Fantastic Books Publishing family.

Boris has, for many years now, shared his work with the world. His beautifully envisaged story ‘the mePhone’ is a great idea but unfortunately was a little too adult for our short story competition. When we told Boris this, ever the Jedi, he promptly sent us a children’s version!

Here’s a link to the adult version of the mePhone. You’ll have to wait for the anthology before you see the children’s version.

Here’s a link to the Caterpillion, a wonderful Eric Carle-esque look at a different kind of hunger, also by Boris.

Boris continues to create today and his work has been performed live, set to music, painted about, spoken about, broadcast on radio and has even been displayed for 2 months on a giant screen in Melbourne’s equivalent of Times Square called Federation Square, as well as on other screens in Melbourne’s city centre.

He has two degrees: Bachelor of Arts (majoring in Philosophy and Linguistics) and Bachelor of Science (majoring in Mathematics and Physics). Since completing his degrees, he has pursued a writing career.

Dreams are also an important source of creative inspiration to him and many of his stories originate from the scenarios and ideas in his dreams.

Boris says: “Writing for me is a spiritual activity of the highest degree. Writing gives me the conduit to a world that is unreachable by any other means, a world that is populated by Eternal Truths, Ineffable Questions and Infinite Beauty. It is my hope that these stories of mine will allow the reader to also catch a glimpse of this universe.”

Boris used to be the philosopher of a spiritual community and many of his articles were given their premiere by being read out in public programs in front of 200 or so people.

Boris says that he has two life-long ambitions: to become a child prodigy when he grows up and to change the very fabric of space-time itself.

Boris uses the image above as his profile picture. Much like some of his deeper, philosophical work, it made our collective heads hurt so we thought we’d share it with you too.

Boris has also had one of his parables translated into the unique whistling language Silbo Gomero, traditionally spoken by inhabitants in the Canary Islands to communicate across the deep ravines and narrow valleys. Here’s a link to the video, where you can listen to the recording of the parable being whistled as well read the parable both in English and in Spanish.
In his bid to become, amongst many other things, the next Weird Al Yankovic, Boris also writes song parodies which are regularly performed live by professional musicians. You can find videos of their performances  herehere and here.
 
Boris is also working on adapting his stories to the cinematic medium with the Australian film director Peter T. Nathan. Boris contributed to the script of the film “Six Steps to Eternal Death“, written and directed by Peter T. Nathan, which won the Best Film award at the Deakin University Best Film & Television Honours 2015 awards ceremony.

Welcome to the family Boris!

Just imagine,

Daniel and Gabi

More from Boris Glikman:

“Science has always been my first love and I have been creative in the mathematics/physics fields since my teenage years. Until relatively recently, mathematics/physics/science fields were my first interest and it is to them that I devoted most of my time and creative energy, and writing was a distant second interest. Consequently, because I have always been interested in all those fields, I did two degrees Arts/Science at university, to pursue further my interests and learn more about those fields.

However, even before going to the University, I was already creating my own proofs and theories in the mathematics/physics fields, because I did a lot of self-study right from my teenage years. By the age of 15, I was already sending out my ideas in physics to university professors who were quite impressed by their depth and breadth. School teachers and university lecturers saw me as a very promising mathematician/physicist, right up there in the top 1%.

But, for a number of reasons, I became thoroughly disenchanted with science (which I always saw as THE path to the truth) and so instead started to devote all of my attention and energy to writing (which until then I pretty much neglected as a creative outlet), and for me now writing is the path to the truth.”

If you missed reading Boris Glikman’s short stories on this blog and are curious about them, you can go back to the first paragraph of this post and click on the story titles to be taken to them. I think you’ll be glad you did!

The mePhone by Boris Glikman

The mePhone illustration by Michael Cheval

Illustration by Michael Cheval

One of the best things about being on Facebook is the opportunity to get to know some really talented people. One of those gifted ones, is writer & poet Boris Glikman (from Melbourne, AU) who has graciously allowed me to share some of his quirky, fun, short stories here with you.  Here’s the first.  We’d love to hear your thoughts on this piece so please comment!

The mePhone

One day a new type of phone that you could use to call yourself appeared on the market. All one had to do was dial a certain number and one would be connected straight away with oneself. The quality of the reception was so good that the voice on the other end of the line sounded as if it was coming from the very same room.

Inevitably, there was some initial apprehension about using this phone, for no one quite knew what kind of a response they would receive when they rang themselves out of the blue for the very first time. What if their unexpected call was considered to be an impertinent invasion of privacy?

Eventually, these fears subsided as most found that they were greeted with warmth and enthusiasm and their calls were seen as a pleasant surprise. Talking with yourself was just like talking with a dear friend you haven’t seen for a long time and conversation flowed easily.

People rushed to purchase this new invention, which was marketed under the brand name of “mePhone”. Suppliers could not keep up with the demand and there were ugly scenes as customers fought amongst themselves for the last available mePhone.

For mePhone to work properly certain rules had to be followed, and these were set out in the Owner’s Manual. First, the reception only worked in particular areas, access to which required an extra fee. Second, there was a strict time limit on how long you could spend speaking to yourself. And third, when using the mePhone, one had to wear special, rather cumbersome apparel that was sold separately from the phone. Also, owing to the technical complexities involved in establishing a connection, the cost of a call was outrageously expensive, although some enterprising phone companies, hoping to capitalise on the popularity of the mePhone, for a while only charged it at a local call rate.

However, these inconveniences were more than outweighed by the benefits you gained from having a good chat with yourself, for no one had ever had the time to stop and take a good, honest look at their lives. Everyone was always rushing about, preoccupied with the mundane details of existence, trying to silence the nagging question of whether they were happy with their lives and if they were being true to their inner selves.

And so it was an enlightening experience to be able to have a deep and meaningful talk with oneself. The users of the mePhone could now catch up with all the things in their lives they had never had the chance to think about before, to find out the vital news that fell by the wayside as they were speeding along the road of life.

People found that talking with yourself was a lot like talking to an old confidant, with whom the most intimate matters could be discussed. Not infrequently tears were shed as truths one had been hiding from oneself for many years were conveyed in blunt and forthright terms. Conversations gained a confessional aspect as darkest secrets known only to oneself were divulged openly over the phone lines. Quite often, surprises were lying in store as people discovered what they were actually feeling inside. At other times, the voice on the other end of the line would remind you of your long-neglected dreams, of desires and needs you had suppressed for far too long.

Many found out they weren’t really happy in their places of employment. Some realised they had fallen out of love a long time ago. Others saw for the first time that they had deluded themselves as well as others into believing they had reached fulfilment, regardless of how they actually felt inside. Quite a few recognised that they had become so comfortable with being miserable and disenchanted that they shrank back in fear when contentment appeared to be within easy reach.

The world became a better, happier place because of the mePhone as people at last began to be true to their own selves, for they knew they could no longer get away with lying to themselves. The way life had been before the mePhone was just a distant, faded memory and no person could imagine ever being without one.