Moving Forward: An Intimate Evening on Paths, Success, and Love

Moving Forward: An Intimate Evening on Paths, Success, and Love

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CMCS Speaker and Performance Series I

Moving Forward: An Intimate Evening on Paths, Success, and Love

Toronto, ON (March 3, 2014)The Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS) proudly introduces its second location The IndustReal Arts Room (688 Richmond Street, Toronto, ON) with premiere event Moving Forward on Saturday, March 29, 2014. A Canadian and Australian joint production, Moving Forward applies media, social justice, and science to empower individual and social change in a cross-disciplinary and intimate setting.

Dr. Louis Massey opens the series with his inspirational talk on empowering individual paths. Dr. Massey holds a PhD in SoftwareDr. Louis Massey Engineering and is professor of Computer Science at the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario.  Born in Montreal, he is the author of several articles and book chapters on artificial intelligence and mental information processing. On the fiction side, Dr. Massey writes poetry and short stories. He published “The River: Car ton bras sait porter l’épée” in Canadian Voices Volume 2. As a visual artist, he specializes in photography and oil and acrylic painting. He has exhibited at Gallery 22 in Kingston and was a finalist for the Salon Prize 2012.

Dr. Samita Nandy (www.samitanandy.com) and Emmanuel Lopez Dr. Samita Nandy(www.motivatorman.com) join for a talk about success in celebrity culture and inner heroism. Lopez, also called ‘Motivatorman’ has been central to understanding the positive effects of movie heroes as cinematic role models for personal empowerment. Featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and City TV’s Fashion Television, Lopez works with live audiences to maximize their passion for filmsEmmanuel Lopez Motivatorman as examples of individual change. Samita Nandy reveals the secret behind the success of celebrities and empowers social change through her individual journey on writing about fame. Featured on CBC, CP 24 and Rogers Television among many more, Dr. Nandy holds a PhD in media and celebrity studies. Her sensual dance Sacred Eco-Feminist Move will debut along with her innovative words.

Myles Wright (www.myleswright.com) is a music Myles Wrightcomposer, arranger and teacher based in Perth, Western Australia. He studied at the West Australian Academy of Performing Arts, and completed a Masters at the University of Miami. In addition to jazz, Myles is inspired by many styles of music, including ethnic beats such as those heard in the Sacred Eco-Feminist Move.

Ashima Suri  (http://www.ashimasuri.com/) performs the first part of her three-staged performance: ASHES.  Ashima Suri is the Artistic Director forAshima Suri Limitless Productions (www.limitlessproductions.ca), a Social Activist performer, a Writer, a Public Speaker, and a certified Life Coach. Featured on Global Television, OMNI TV and FUSIA magazine, she empowers individuals, facilitates meaningful employment and brings social change through worldwide performances, interactive programs, workshops and one-on-one coaching. In collaboration with Choreographic Consultant from inDANCE, Hiroshi Miyamato, Mentor, Takako Segawa, and Visual Artist, Vishal Misra, Ashima tells a story of a woman who, through the reflection of herself in the painting, begins to shed the many layers and expectations of herself to the point where all that is left are ashes. Each stage represents an emotional release of anger, letting go and fearless resolution / re-birth.

Schedule

7:00 – 8:00 pm – Opening Reception

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm – Panel with Louis Massey, Samita Nandy, Emmanuel Lopez, and Ashima Suri

9:00 – 9:15 pm – Q / A

9:15 – 10:30 pm – After Party

Dress Code: Semi-Casual

Venue: The IndustREAL Arts Room (688 Richmond St., Toronto, ON) next to Queen West

Cover Charge: $10

For title sponsorship and media interviews, contact info@cmc-centre.com or call 416.985.8887.

For high resolution images, please send an email to info@cmc-centre.com with your name, title, media you represent and your telephone number.

Writer Advice’s 2nd Scintillating Starts Contest

Writer Advice Wants You!Writers advice from The Elements of Style

Entice us. Submit the opening (up to 1500 words) of your book (any genre) to Writer Advice’s 2nd Scintillating Starts Contest. I’ll respond like an agent/editor. You get perspective.

DEADLINE: October 18, 2013. 

JUDGES: Writer and editor B. Lynn Goodwin will judge and may consult with other writers as part of the process. All finalists are winners (small cash award) & can say that to prospective publishers.

PRIZES: Small cash award split evenly among all winners.

ENTRY FEE: $20. FOR BEST RESULTS:

1. Include your name, contact information, and title in the cover letter, but only include your title in the submission so it remains anonymous.

2.   Tell us if the submission is fiction or memoir in the cover letter.

3.   Since we judge these anonymously, please don’t tell us your background or where you’ve been published. If you are a finalist, we’ll ask for a bio.

4.   Please double-space your submission.

SUBMISSIONS: All entries should be submitted through Submittable. Submit to Writer Advice. You may enter UP TO THREE stories, but each is a separate submission with a separate fee of $20.

Winning pieces will be posted in the fall issue of Writer Advice. E-mail questions, but not submissions to editor B. Lynn Goodwin at Lgood67334@comcast.net

Q&A With Authors Gina Buonaguro & Janice Kirk

Gina Buonaguro and Janice KirkToday, I’m talking to Canadian writers Gina Buonaguro and Janice Kirk, co-authors of The Wolves of St. Peter’s, The Sidewalk Artist and Ciao Bella. I loved The Sidewalk Artist when I read it in 2011 and when HarperCollins Canada asked me if I wanted to review their latest book, The Wolves of St. Peter’s, a historical thriller set in Renaissance Rome, I couldn’t say no. I loved that book too so I jumped at the opportunity to interview Gina and Janice for my blog.

Hello ladies!  I understand that you originally met in a French class and that not long after you decided to form your own author’s group. This year you’re celebrating 10 years of writing together, congratulations!

Thank you! We can’t believe ourselves that we’ve been writing together for more than a decade. 

  1. What is the hardest thing for you to deal with when it comes to co-authoring a book?

At this point in our writing career, it would be finding enough time to do all the research and writing we want to do! The minutiae of life can really get in the way.

  1. Where are some of the places you’ve traveled to for research?

We’ve both been to many of the locations of our books independently (Paris, Rome, Florence, Euganean Hills – although neither of us has ever been to Urbino, a key setting in The Sidewalk Artist). For the first time ever, we took a research trip together to Venice in January 2013. Gina spent a week there, while Janice stayed for a month. We did a lot of thinking about our next novel, a sequel to The Wolves of St. Peter’s. It was an excellent chance to soak up atmosphere while working on the plotting and characters.

  1. Is Italy your favourite country and if so, why? 

Yes, it certainly seems to be our favourite country to write about! Gina has an Italian background, which perhaps partly explains her attraction. Janice visited Venice for the first time about 15 years ago and fell in love with the place – she has gone back every other year since then, renting an apartment for a month at a time. Plus, the scenery in Italy is spectacular, the food delicious, and who wouldn’t love a place where you can start drinking wine before lunch?

  1. Was there anything in specific that attracted you to writing about Renaissance Italy for The Wolves of St. Peter’s? 

We wrote about Renaissance Italy in our first novel, The Sidewalk Artist, though it was basically by accident since the artist Raphael ended up being a major character. After moving to the World War II-era for our second novel, Ciao Bella, we realized we much preferred writing about a time and place further back in time. We strive to be as historically accurate as humanly possible, but it is nice to write about a period where no one is still alive to correct you. Plus, we already had a working knowledge about Renaissance Italy and wanted to dig into it deeper. There’s so much wonderful fodder for a great mystery.

  1. What was the most disturbing and the most interesting fact that you uncovered while doing research for The Wolves of St. Peter’s?

There certainly were a lot of disturbing facts we unearthed during the The Wolves of St. Peter's by Gina Buonaguro & Janice Kirkresearch for The Wolves of St. Peter’s. The Renaissance is often quite romanticized, but essentially you would not want to live any other time and place than the developed world in the 21st century. One especially interesting fact came out of Steven Pinker’s book, The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined. The outhouses of the Renaissance rang with the sounds of dying newborns. That was because women had no access to abortion and had to resort to infanticide for unwanted babies. According to Pinker, the modern-day rates of abortion parallel the infanticide rates of the past. Whatever your views on abortion, that’s certainly something to think about.

  1. Who is your most endearing character in the book aside from Francesco?

That’s like asking which of your children you love the most! Anyway, we really enjoy The Turk, despite how despicable he is. Based on Silvio Berlusconi, he’s the guy we love to hate. We do love Dante the bat man as well as have a very soft spot for Susanna, who is just trying to make her way in this world so unfriendly to women.

  1. Can you tell us more about the next book you’re writing?

Our next novel is a sequel to The Wolves of St. Peter’s, the second of an envisioned trilogy, and it will take place in Venice, at a time when dowry inflation was skyrocketing. Patrician families were only able to marry off one of their daughters, and the only other respectable position for a woman was a convent. So the nunneries of the city were filled with women who didn’t want to be there, which certainly makes for fascinating social dynamics.

  1. Venice is one of the cities on my bucket list and I have a Pinterest board dedicated to it. What specific detail about Venice inspired you the most?

Boy this is a hard one – it’s a completely inspirational city. We touched on Venice in our first two novels but obviously not The Wolves of St. Peter’s, which is set exclusively in Rome. The sequel will take place during a Venetian winter, which is a very mysterious time in the life of the city. When we went there last January, fog often hung just above the canals, and several times we heard the aqua alta sirens, which warn about potential flooding. The streets were damp, and the churches were often as cold as a tomb. And yet in the shops and restaurants and cafes, there was much warmth and light. It was a wonderful contrast.

  1. What will you be speaking about at Kingston WritersFest on September 27th?

We’re really looking forward to this event. We’ll be talking about our coauthoring process as well as our research into Renaissance Rome about art, the Vatican, Michelangelo, Raphael, and the role of women.

10. Are the canines in your Facebook banner photo real wolves?

The dogs in our author photo are Tamaskans, a type of husky from Scandinavia. Our photographer friend owns them, and we thought they would be a perfect addition, given the title of the book. It was quite the photo session at Fort Henry getting them to cooperate!

Thank you very much Gina and Janice for this wonderfully interesting and informative interview. I look forward to meeting you in person at your book signing event at Chapters Kingston on Saturday, September 28, 2013 (between 12:00 – 3:00 pm)!